Please select your home edition
Edition
Coast Guard Foundation LEADERBOARD 2

Finn Class: Staying alive for the 2024 Olympic Regatta

by Robert Deaves 23 Oct 2019 02:23 PDT 23 October 2019
Tapio NIrkko, day 3 - Ready Steady Tokyo Olympic test event © Robert Deaves
The latest news from the International Finn Class: www.finnclass.org
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Email
Email
YouTube
YouTube
Instagram
Instagram
Flickr
Flickr
Will Tokyo 2020 be the Finn's last appearance at the Olympics?

#SaveTheFinn An opportunity to rebalance the slate and create more legends

  
Huge numbers of words have been written about the arguments for putting the Finn back into the Olympic Games. Next week, the Finn class will be making its case once again at the 2019 World Sailing Conference in Bermuda to try and rebalance the proposed slate for 2024.

There are a lot of people who firmly believe that the Finn still deserves its place within the Olympics. Some will step forward and say so, while some will hedge their bets, unsure whether to stand out from the crowd. However, the question everyone is asking is how to achieve that while conforming to the stated requirements of the IOC, namely gender equity, equipment balance and innovation.

Though the proposed slate has gender equity, it does not have physical equity, which is a stated objective of the IOC as well a key policy agreed by World Sailing Council in 2017.

Since 2018, when Council and AGM voted for a slate that did not include the Finn, the class has suffered from a drain of athletes disillusioned with Olympic sailing, seeing no way to realise their Olympic dream.

These sailors are not just lost to the Finn, but more importantly to Olympic sailing, and in some cases to the entire sport of sailing. Without the Finn, or a boat like the Finn, they saw no future in Olympic sailing, no possible way to achieve their lifelong goal. Some of these sailors will be in Bermuda. Ask them how they feel about it.
#SaveTheFinn
Over the past 70 years the Finn class has produced some of the most prominent legends in the sport. Many sailors who have passed through the Finn Class ended up changing the world. How many of these sailors would have made it through to the top echelons of the sport in the way that they did, without the iconic Finn to learn from? It has produced world-class sailors and world-class leaders and businessmen because of the discipline and dedication required from an Olympic campaign. Just ask people like John Bertrand, Russell Coutts, Iain Percy and Ben Ainslie. 

Many of these legendary sailors - supremely fit, supremely strong and supremely talented and of average build - would not be able to compete in the Olympic Games in 2024 with the proposed slate of events. Even the new Mixed Offshore Keelboat looks like it will favour sailors much lighter than any of these sailing heroes were when they were at the peak of their physical powers.

It is often said that the Finn was removed from the proposed slate for 2024 because there was no matching female equipment. However, it could be argued that to match a boat generally considered best suited to large males against an equivalent class for females is a largely pointless exercise, because it is an artificial representation of the sport and the equipment available. The equipment chosen for males and females should be the best possible equipment available to represent the sport in all its many facets, and all the different physiques of the human race.

This is one of the many messages the Finn class will bring to Bermuda. All have been stated many times before, but they remain as true and as relevant today as ever.
  Probably the most physical and athletic sailing class in the world
  Part of the established pathway from youth boats to Americas Cup
  A supreme physical and mental challenge in the sport of sailing
  One of the most widely sailed classes on the planet
  Creates legendary sailors that inspire future generations
  Equipment is quality controlled, FRAND compliant and accessible
  Delivers consistent, exciting media coverage on schedule in all weather conditions
  The only realistic dinghy for sailors over 85 kg at the Olympic Games
Where do they go now? What should they do?
Do you know a sailor directly impacted by this decision? Have they told you it is the end of their Olympic dream? Or the end of their sailing career? For some it certainly is already, with decisions being taken right now to stop sailing the Finn and in some cases, to stop sailing altogether, by young men who could have been the future of our sport. They have been seriously let down by this process. How does that make you feel?

Have you read the submissions from the Finn class? Do you understand what is proposed within the submissions and the possible range of outcomes? The fundamental premise is that foiling boards should have two events and not three as that better represents the sport around the world. It would also free up an event for the Finn, giving both gender and physical equity.

It would allow the reintroduction of the Finn and Olympic sailings strongest, most athletic sailors. The Finn is World Sailings iconic Blue Riband event, its 100m, the event that made heroes of Elvstrøm, Coutts, Ainslie and many more and has inspired generations of new sailors. As a sport, do we really want to lose all that?

There will be a strong Finn contingent in Bermuda for the conference, hoping to get this message across. However this is not a one-person effort, but rather it needs to be a collective effort by Finn sailors and supporters worldwide. Send this to your MNA, your Council Member and your NOC and tell them why the Finn deserves its place at the Olympic Games.

Next week there will be an opportunity to Rebalance the slate and reinstate the Finn as Olympic Equipment for 2024 and beyond. Who will grasp that opportunity?

Anyone who wants to help put the Finn back into the Olympics should contact the Finn class at finn@finnclass.org.
 
#savethefinn #longlivethefinn #wtf #finnclass #finn
Time to act
You can read more about these submissions and the reasoning behind them here.

All the submissions can be found here.

Individually there are here:
Submission 099-19  Submission 100-19
Submission 101-19  Submission 102-19
Submission 103-19  Submission 104-19
Submission 105-19  Submission 106-19
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Email
Email
YouTube
YouTube
Instagram
Instagram
Flickr
Flickr
Copyright © 2019 International Finn Association, All rights reserved.


     

Related Articles

2022 Finn Gold Cup to be held at Malcesine
World championship to be held on Lake Garda, Italy in May The International Finn Class and Fragila Vela Malcesine are delighted to announce that the 2022 Finn Gold Cup will be held at Malcesine on Lake Garda, Italy, from 15-21 May. Posted on 24 Oct
Finn World Masters at Mar Menor overall
Medals decided with no racing possible on Friday The 2021 Finn World Masters on Mar Menor, Murcia, Spain, concluded on Friday with no more races possible. With a difficult forecast the fleet was sent out in the hope of one final race, but after a brief hope was dashed, racing was abandoned for the day. Posted on 16 Oct
Finn World Masters at Mar Menor day 4
Valerian Lebrun wins with day to spare The fourth day of the 2021 Finn World Masters on Mar Menor in Murcia, Spain produced yet more great racing, with Valerian Lebrun, from France, securing the title with a day to spare. Posted on 15 Oct
Finn World Masters at Mar Menor day 3
Fleet leaders survive Mar Menor light winds Only one race was scheduled on the third day of the 2021 Finn World Masters on Mar Menor, Murcia, Spain. Anthony Nossiter, from Australia, led from start to finish in the light winds only to find he'd been black flagged for the second race running. Posted on 13 Oct
Warsash Finn Open and Traveller Series finale
Strong sun and gentle breezes in October! At the end of week when successive areas of low pressure passed over the UK leaving strong winds and heavy rain, twenty-two Finn sailors arrived at Warsash Sailing Club for the final BFA open meeting of 2021, to find strong sun and gentle breezes. Posted on 13 Oct
Finn World Masters at Mar Menor day 2
Lebrun extends on high scoring second day in Spain Bas de Waal, from the Netherlands, and Jesus Pintos, from Spain, may have won the races on the second day of the 2021 Finn World Masters on the Mar Menor, in Spain, but it was France's Valerian Lebrun who extended his lead Posted on 13 Oct
Finn World Masters at Mar Menor day 1
Valerian Lebrun leads after Finntastic opening day Finn racing doesn't get much better than the opening day of the 2021 Finn World Masters on Mar Menor, in Murcia, Spain. With 12-18 knots of wind and in 25 degrees, two races were sailed in near perfect conditions. Posted on 11 Oct
Finn World Masters on Mar Menor underway
Divine conditions for the start of the event in Spain Not everyone went out for Sunday's practice race at the 2021 Finn World Masters on the Mar Menor, in Spain, but those who did were treated to divine conditions ahead of what looks set to be a highly memorable championship. Posted on 11 Oct
50th Finn World Masters preview
Around 120 entries from 27 countries are expected to travel to Spain After nearly two and a half years of waiting, the 50th Finn World Masters will finally take place next week at Los Alcazares on the Mar Menor in Murcia, Spain. Posted on 5 Oct
Finn Travellers at Highcliffe
19 helms for the penultimate event of the series Over the final weekend of September nineteen Finns descended on Mudeford Quay for the penultimate event in the Travellers Trophy series, hosted by Highcliffe Sailing Club. Posted on 28 Sep
Hyde Sails 2021 - Basic FOOTERSelden 2020 - FOOTERLloyd Stevenson Catalyst 45 728x90px1 BOTTOM