sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Video Gallery Photo Gallery
Sail-World.com : When in Doubt, Anchor Out!
When in Doubt, Anchor Out!


'Anchor out to repair rigging'    Captain John Jamieson    Click Here to view large photo

Imagine that you approach the harbor entrance to a major city on a calm, but black, starless night. You strain your eyes through binoculars to search for the line of buoys that mark the approach--and see nothing. No flashes. No lights. You sweep to the right and left to look for the city lights--and see nothing. No signs of life anywhere. What do you do now?

The answer lies in this true anecdote told by Captain John Jamieson, veteran coastguard officer and master training specialist in navigation and seamanship.

Our weary Coastguard crew tied up to the pier In St. Pete, Florida late one September afternoon. We had been underway for three blazing hot weeks working aids to navigation from Tampa Bay around the Straits of Florida to Miami. And we had one objective after we moored - get her cleaned up and head home for some much needed rest and relaxation.

After securing our 133' coastal buoy tender, we shuffled down the gangway and made our way home. And then the phones began to ring. I could tell by the sound of the ring-tone it was serious--little did I know just how bad it would be...

'Recall! Recall! Emergency Recall! Pack your stuff again -- you're underway in 2 hours! They need your help to the North.' South Carolina had called. They'd just received a visit from a nasty guy named Hugo.

This hell-raising hurricane had left death, destruction and devastation in his wake. And tenders were being called for help. Could we handle it? You betcha! Midnight - 'Underway as before' read the log entry.

It was a two day transit to Charleston. Since I had experience as a search and rescue coxswain in Charleston in my younger days, the skipper asked me to take her in. Our estimated time of arrival at the sea buoy was around 1am. It was going to be dicey going in...

Ghost Town of the Mid-Atlantic?

I posted double lookouts on bow and flying bridge and watched the radar like a hawk. Never had I seen such blackness. No lights, dead calm, the sky dark and overcast. The blackest night I can ever recall.
And the radar? I held the chart next to the radar scope and glanced from chart to scope and back. Nothing made sense! The land profile was all wrong. Something wasn't right. None of the buoys were showing up on the radar. No blips where they should be blipping. 'All Stop!'...

I held my position just outside the jetties and called the Captain. We both scanned the horizon with binoculars and checked the scope on all scales. Nothing...Nada...No horizon, no lights, absolute blackness. Only one decision made sense -- anchor and wait until morning. And that's just what we did. We moved out of the 'channel' - at least what used to be a channel -- and dropped our hook. And when the sun rose that morning, we saw a sight out of one of those catastrophe movies.

Utter devastation. Astronomically high tides covered most of the jetties. Buoys lay atop the remaining jetty stones like beached whales. We pulled up our anchor and cautiously picked our way through the chaos of debris. More buoys had been tossed onto the beach, scattered like seashells here and there.

And so it was with the city. Complete loss of power. Yachts in the middle of highways. Unbelievable. For the next few weeks, buoy-tenders from all over the mid-Atlantic worked sunup to sundown - repairing, replacing and re-positioning every aid to navigation in Charleston harbor, its tributaries, and the adjacent Intracoastal Waterway.

October 1989: 'Underway as before' -- read our log entry. Looking astern that beautiful fall evening was a sight to behold. From horizon to horizon, every light was brightly lit in both city and harbor. The courageous people of Charleston had rallied and won. And we were glad we could help!


Want to develop the mindset of a master mariner to handle a situation like this? First, make your main bow anchor plus a second anchor ALWAYS ready to deploy in an instant.

Seven Reasons to Anchor for Sailing Safety:

Anchor out for safety if visibility is a problem -  .. .  

Use those anchors without hesitation if you need to:

* Stop your boat in an emergency.
* Wait for fog or bad weather to blow over.
* Prevent your boat from grounding.
* Help unground your boat into deeper water.
* Repair an engine or sailing rigging.
* Wait for daylight if unsure of your position.
* Get rest or sleep when you're tired.

Anchor out for safety - sailing when exhausted encourages bad decisions -  .. .  

Prepare your boat ahead of time as much as practicable, to deal with those unforeseen events just over the horizon. Keep you and your sailing crew or partner safe and sound on the waters of the world--wherever you choose to sail or cruise!

John Jamieson (Captain John) with 25+ years of experience shows you the no-nonsense cruising skills you need for safer sailing worldwide. Visit his website at www.skippertips.com. Sign up for the Free, highly popular weekly 'Captain John's Sailing Tip-of-the-Week'. Discover how you can gain instant access to hundreds of sailing articles, videos, and e-Books!


by John Jamieson

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=107073

8:03 PM Thu 28 Feb 2013GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.


Related News Stories:

19 Feb 2013  Expose on EPIRBS - what price safety?
13 Feb 2013  One sailing incident and the lessons learned
13 Feb 2013  Lessons all boat owners can learn from Hurricane Sandy
05 Feb 2013  Calling UK Sailing Clubs: Attend RYA Club Clinics 2-3 March
01 Feb 2013  Look for These Hidden Monsters of the Seven Seas!
13 Jan 2013  Three thieves of boat engine's reliability - vital info for sailors
09 Jan 2013  Women Californian sailors meet for convention
07 Jan 2013  MOB - Learn the 'Elevator' Recovery Technique!
04 Jan 2013  Yacht restoration school - Open House in January
15 Dec 2012  Preparing for heavy sailing weather before it arrives!
MORE STORIES ...






News - USA and the World











America's Cup Book Review: Winging It - Oracle Team USA's comeback *Feature by Richard Gladwell Sail-World.com/nz,




Rolex China Sea Race 2014 - nip and tuck for IRC honours by RHKYC and Guy Nowell, Sail-World Asia, Hong Kong


























HUD Vision: An interview with Afterguard Marine’s Alex Moret *Feature by David Schmidt, Sail-World USA Editor, Seattle














America's Cup: Expected de Ridder penalty should be reduced *Feature by Richard Gladwell/Sail-World.com/nz, Auckland, NZ












Image gallery: James Cook High's Royal encounter on Steinlager 2 *Feature
Volvo Ocean Race - Maersk Line named shipping partner
Congressional Cup - Victory for Taylor Canfield and crew
SSV Oliver Hazard Perry joins America's Tall Ship fleet + Video
2014 Halifax – Saint-Pierre Ocean Race
Oyster Regatta Antigua - Glorious conditions prevail on final day
WWA Pro Card Qualifier - Pro Cards earned at Freedom Wake Park
Christmas Caribbean Rally - Top class sailors to compete
Earth Day boater tips
Anna Tunnicliffe - from CrossFit to Extreme 40's
Charleston Race Week - Photos by Chris Howell
Image Gallery: Stratis SL33 flies on the Waitemata
Audi Melges 20- Sperry Topsider Charleston Race Week - Light final day
Clipper Round the World Yacht Race - PSP Logistics prepares for USA
ISAF Sailing World Cup Hyères - Crème of the crop to compete
Congressional Cup: Luna Rossa makes podium in first event
Int 14 World Championships 2015 launch new event website
International Optimist Regatta Clinic and Team Race - Register now!
Congressional Cup: World top rankers finish that way in Long Beach
Sperry Top-Sider Charleston Race Week Day 3 finale
America's Cup: Gino Morrelli outlines the new AC62 design   
Doyle Sails New Zealand signs Andrew Brown as One Design Manager   
America's Cup: Dean Barker's Blog - A sail with the Duke and Duchess *Feature   
29er World Youth Sailing Week Easter regatta - Day 1 and 2 overall   
C Thomas Clagett Jr Memorial Clinic/Regatta - Entries start to roll in   
50th Congressional Cup: See the delayed coverage and media conferences   
Clipper Race 10 Day 27: Closing stages - Qingdao to San Francisco   
Canfield, Williams, Bruni, Swinton in Congressional Cup final four   
Sperry Top-Sider Charleston Race Week - Day 2   
Audi Melges 20 Charleston Race Week - Perfect conditions in Charleston   
Oyster Regatta Antigua - Full on ocean conditions for day 3   
PWA World Tour - A taste of things to come at La Torche + Video   
Women's International Match Racing Series kicks off in June   
Melges 32 Audi Tron Sailing Series - Action shots by Max Ranchi   
Clipper Round the World Yacht Race - Frustrating conditions   
Man rescued after falling overboard in Pacific taken to hospital   
Sperry Top-Sider Charleston Race Week 2014 - Youth leading Melges 20   
Congressional Cup - Canfield leads toward Congressional Cup sailoffs   
Sperry Top-Sider Charleston Race Week 2014 - Perfection for Day 1   
America's Cup: Coutts claims ISAF Jury on a crusade, backs Kiwi report *Feature   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
X6XL NEW US