Please select your home edition
Edition
Southern Spars - North Technology

Rolex Sydney Hobart- Youth America's Cup winners just metres apart

by Richard Gladwell on 29 Dec 2013
Peter Burling gets a wet welcome to offshore racing aboard the Cookson 50, Pretty Fly III cresting the big seas passing Tasman Island - 2013 Rolex Sydney Hobart © Rolex/Daniel Forster http://www.regattanews.com

Red Bull Youth America's Cup winners and New Zealand Sailors of the Year, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke, were almost inseparable at the finish of the 2013 Rolex Sydney Hobart, despite being on different boats – one almost twice the size of the other.

They finished just over three days after the race started in Sydney and were only a few metres apart in what proved to be a blanket finish for the two New Zealander who are the current World and European Champions in the Olympic 49er class, as well as having won the inaugural Red Bull Youth America’s Cup in San Francisco in August.

Those wins sit very comfortably alongside their Silver medal won in the 2012 Sailing Olympics. Small wonder their names are the tips of most pundits’ tongues when the options are considered for maintaining New Zealand’s long and proud legacy in the Volvo Ocean Race and America’s Cup.

At the age of just 21years old, Burling sailed his second Olympics in Weymouth.


Sail-World caught up with the duo ahead of the 2013 Rolex Sydney Hobart – Burling is ailing aboard the Cookson 50, Pretty Fly III, formerly the Auckland owned, Pussy Galore – where she enjoyed an impressive racing record in the hands of Anatole Masfen. Now owned by Colin and Gladys Woods finished second in IRC Division 0 in the 2010 event.

Burling was clear on his reasons for making a move into offshore racing, after a very successful and intense year.

'This year we have been doing a lot of yachting,' he explained. 'We’re always trying to learn new skills from different areas of the sport.

'Ocean racing is always something I have been pretty interested in. It is the ultimate endurance test.

'The Sydney Hobart is a short race compared to a Volvo – with its 20 day plus legs.

'The Volvo is one of the things I would like to do in the future, once I have a bit of experience and a foot in the door', he added.


In ocean racing terms, forward hand Blair Tuke is more experienced than Burling, with a previous Sydney Hobart on his regatta card, and several other ocean races.

He competed in the 2012 Rolex Sydney Hobart aboard the RP45, Rikki, owned skippered by fellow NZ Sailor of the Year, Ray Haslar. But this year he will step up to the 100ft Farr 100 superyacht Zefiro owned by Maltese based German businessman Gerhard Ruether.

'This is my second Sydney Hobart. We have a good group of guys on board, mostly off V5 (Auckland based TP52 winner of the last Noumea and Fiji races) who I sailed with on the Fiji race.

'Mike Quilter is going with us, and it is a real honour to sail with him. He’s one of the legends of ocean racing in New Zealand.

'When that is done we’ll come back to Auckland and get into the A-class catamarans for the Worlds in Takapuna,' he added.

Many see the World Champions’ foray into ocean racing as a precursor to the Volvo Ocean Race.

'I love offshore racing,' Tuke explains. 'This is Pete’s first time offshore, it will be good to see if he enjoys it. I’ve done one Sydney Hobart and been to Fiji three or four times. I really enjoy it. It is fun pushing the boat hard for 24 hours, for day after day. At some stage I would love to do the Volvo Ocean Race.

'Just when that is – we’ll have to wait and see', he adds.


'Pete and I have sailed together for five and a half years now and the more we sail together the stronger our relationship has become. We enjoy hanging out with each other - not just when we are racing, but doing other stuff as well.

'We both have a similar drive to try and be the best All those things add up when things aren’t going so well. It makes it a little easier.'

At the finish of the 630nm blue water Classic, the two were just metres apart despite the huge discrepancy in size between the two yachts. Pretty Fly III finished second in Division 0 on IRC and was expecting to be fifth overall – depending on the finish times of other boats still at sea.

Ancasta Ker 33 660x82NaiadSouthern Spars - 100

Related Articles

A Q&A with US Sailing’s Malcolm Page about the Sailing World Cup Miami
I spoke with Malcolm Page, US Sailing’s Olympic chief, about the team’s performance at the 2017 Sailing World Cup Miami I talked with Malcolm Page (AUS), a two-time Olympic gold medalist in the Men’s 470 class and the chief of Olympic sailing at US Sailing, to get his pulse on the team’s performance at the 2017 Sailing World Cup Miami and discuss some recent coaching changes within the Olympic-sailing program.
Posted on 20 Feb
America's Cup - Emirates Team NZ give first look at the pedaling AC50
Emirates Team New Zealand formally christened their new AC50 America's Cup Challenger on a rainy Auckland afternoon. Emirates Team New Zealand formally christened their new AC50 America's Cup Challenger on a rainy Auckland afternoon. The team has been sailing for the previous two days making news headlines after it was revealed in Sail-World.com that the AC50 would become only the second yacht in America's Cup history to use pedal power.
Posted on 16 Feb
America's Cup - Kiwis sign Olympic Cyclist for the Tour de Bermuda
Ttop cyclist Simon van Velthooven, a 2012 Olympic Bronze cycling medallist had been signed by the America's Cup team Emirates Team New Zealand put in a second foiling display on Auckland's Waitemata harbour ahead of the official launching of their AC50 tomorrow. With brighter skies the cycling team took their places on the pedalstals and used leg power to provide the hydraulic pressure necessary to run the AC50's control systems for the foils and wingsail.
Posted on 15 Feb
A Q&A with Shawn Macking about the StPYC’s Sailing Center and OD fleet
I talked with Shawn Macking, the StPYC’s waterfront director, to learn how the club is getting more people out sailing. I caught up with Shawn Macking, waterfront director of the St. Petersburg Yacht Club, via email to learn more about the club’s Sailing Center, its hefty investment in a new fleet of ten J/70s, and how the StPYC is using this infrastructure to expose more people to the sport we all love.
Posted on 13 Feb
A Q&A with Karen Angle about the 2017 Conch Republic Cup race to Cuba
I caught up with Karen Angle, executive director of the Conch Republic Cup, to learn more about this exciting event. If you’re like me and have arrived at saturation with winter’s cold rain and snow, imagine racing to Cuba as part of a 13-day cross-cultural event that’s designed to lower barriers of entry at a time when some Americans see a need for taller walls. I caught up with Karen Angle, executive director of the Conch Republic Cup, to learn more about this exciting event and the adventures it affords.
Posted on 23 Jan
A Q&A with Anna Tunnicliffe about her return to competitive sailing
I talked with Anna Tunnicliffe before the Sailing World Cup Miami to learn about her return to Olympic-class sailing. Anna Tunnicliffe won gold at the Beijing 2008 Olympics in the Laser Radial before shifting her sights to the Women’s Match Racing event for the London 2012 Olympics. Here, she came up shy of expectation and left sailing for the CrossFit Games, but now she is returning to her roots. I talked with Tunnicliffe before the Sailing World Cup Miami to learn about her return to Olympic-class sailing.
Posted on 23 Jan
A Q&A with Dick Neville, Quantum Key West Race Week’s RC chairman
I caught up with Dick Neville, Race Committee chair for the Quantum Key West Race Week, to learn more about the event. For the past 30 years, international sailors have gathered in Key West, Florida, each January for Key West Race Week, a regatta that has achieved legendary status due to its calendar dates, its location, and the impressive level of competition and racecourse management that this storied event offers. I caught up with Dick Neville, Race Committee chair for this year’s Quantum KWRW, to learn more.
Posted on 16 Jan
A Q&A with Daniel Smith, the Clipper Race’s new deputy race director
I talked with Daniel Smith, the Clipper Round The World Race’s new deputy race director, to learn more about his role. I was fortunate to sail with Daniel Smith [36, SCO], skipper of “Derry~Londonderry~Doire” for the 2015/2016 edition of the Clipper Round The World Race, when the fleet reached Seattle last spring. Now, Smith has been hired as the event’s deputy race director-a job that will test many of the skills that he polished as a skipper. I caught up with Smith via email to learn more about his new job.
Posted on 9 Jan
Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race - Suck it up, sunshine!
The 72nd start of the iconic blue water classic had 300,000 spectators lining the foreshores of Sydney Harbour The 72nd start of the iconic blue water classic had 300,000 spectators lining the foreshores of Sydney Harbour, another two million watching on TV, and the constant buzz and whir of media helicopters overhead. 88 boats, from Australia, USA, UK, Germany, Sweden, Russia, Japan, Korea, China, oh and New Zealand, had lined up on three start lines.
Posted on 31 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart Race - More merriment on the airwaves
Here are more examples of merriment on the airwaves between the boats and Hobart Race Control So on December 29, 2016, after the River Derwent had let just three boats home (Perpetual Loyal, Giacomo and Scallywag, all inside the old race record, she went to sleep for a lot of the day. This made it frustrating for the sailors, some of whom saw the lighter side. So after seeing some of those in Dark & Stormy, here are more examples of merriment on the airwaves between the boats and HRC
Posted on 29 Dec 2016