Please select your home edition
Edition
Auckland On the Water Boat Show

Quantum Sails – Keep your $100 notes in your pocket (Pt II)

by John Curnow on 15 Nov 2013
Quantum Racing on day five of 32 Copa de Rey Mapfre de Vela at Real Club Nautico de Palma on August 02 2013 in Palma, Spain. Xaume Olleros / 52 Super Series
We’re back with Quantum Australasia’s Carl Crafoord, who is keen to show all sailors how to avoid spending too much time in the cold shower, tearing up $100 notes. In this second instalment of Quantum Sails – Keep your $100 notes in your pocket, we get to hear about some of his pet loves and hates.

Four years after Crafoord took over the reins in Australasia, you wonder how things have unfolded for his operation. ‘2010 was awesome, but after that we have all seen the market contract, so it is hard out there, however we are doing well. We are a team of 20 people in Australia, which is good achievement when you are coming off a base of zero. We have retained nearly all of our customers and this is a very good thing. So in short, we have had significant growth, which is great considering the bad market. It is better to look after those we have on board already.’


Talking about working with his existing customers, for his 28th run to Hobart, Carl will not be on Lahana, as she is for sale. Instead, he will be the Navigator on the ES44, Swish. ‘Stephen Proud is a great customer and we believe we can win with this boat. There is a good crew on board, top-flight equipment, and we have achieved the best value for his expenditure’, said Crafoord. At just under six metric tonnes and having three of that on the bulb, the Kernan/Courable penned vessel will be one to watch out for.


‘Sailing does have an older demographic now. There are a lot of us who work hard on Junior sailing, as we have a whole generation that’s sort of gone missing, and the average age at yacht clubs is up. At my club, Middle Harbour, it is 53 years. It is hard to get people out to go training. When it was all about One Tonners, there’d be 20 different models out on Sydney Harbour practicing a couple of times a week. Now no one has the time. So if you do not have any professional sailors on board, then you’ll need good amateurs. For Swish, we have a fitness regime, we do sail training, technical training and of course, we’ll use our Quantum playbook so that everyone knows their stuff - the mechanical training that is just so crucial.’

‘Sailing is not just recreational to most people now. You have to be the best. I have done 27 Rolex Sydney Hobart races and luck is not really a part of the elements inside your control. I do enjoy the race, and I think it should be on every month. With all the aids you have at your disposal today, I find that all the conditions change every eight hours or so and then your routing will alter constantly, too. If you’re out there for three days you may see nine separate or sub-weather systems and then there is tide and location on track relative to your competitors to factor in, as well’, commented Carl, drawing on his vast experience with these matters.


‘Why do I do it? Well, for me it’s because I grew up with it. I’ll be at the Mornington Optimist Nationals after the Hobart, just like every other Father, and hopefully my son will go on to be a part of the Sydney to Hobart fabric, just like my Dad and I.’


‘One of the other adages that I used to hear around in yachting circles was that there has never been a problem that throwing money at it has didn’t solve. Today there is just not that kind of disposable coin lying around. You have to be more prudent. Quantum is committed to building on its strengths, sharing its knowledge across their network and with their customers. To build a knowledge base you first have to build the system and then make the best of that investment by diligently applying yourself to it.’

‘Sail making has historically been a little random, perhaps even cottage industry-like. Quantum is about having quantitative data to make sure each set of sails is the best value for money and repeatable. There are different types of products depending on where you choose to land on the sailing spectrum, but we have transparent design and our database is shared globally. In this way we offer world-class sails at the best price, of the best quality and in shortest time possible. Quality divided by price equals value and that’s what Quantum is all about.’

‘Longevity is a key issue for anyone purchasing sails these days. Our MR5000 club level sails have proven to provide the best levels of value, efficiency, performance and durability. No one will love a sail that delaminates in a year. We have had no membrane failures and I think this is a real testament to the business’, said Crafoord.


Now if you find yourself talking with a sail maker, then you’d just have to ask for their thoughts on sail care. The proverbial Lay Down Misére, you might say. ‘I really do think it is an important subject to talk about. I find it a bit incredible that, for example, a Beneteau 40 owner spends $10,000 on a mainsail and $7,000 on a jib and then the crew leaves them flaked, and subsequently stands, walks or sleeps on them. Just the other day I saw a mainsail with the boom cover off while they were still in the pen and I asked the crew if they would please put it back on, as UV light is the killer.’

‘If we sailed exclusively at night and rolled them up afterwards, sails would last forever. They really don’t like being bent and hinged or left in the sun, especially the expensive ones. The fibres will survive whether they’re carbon, Dacron, polyester, but the film is especially sensitive to UV.’


‘Other favourite follies are spinnakers never being washed or correctly folded, just stuffed back in their bag. The classic is the Code Zero furled back up tight and then coiled on the deck sole like a cobra to only then be hastily dumped back into a sack. Please take them back on deck after your race, hoist, unfurl and lower them back, flaking them nicely ready for their bag.’

‘After a year, poorly treated new sails can look like they have seen ten seasons transpire. You can actually get many seasons from your wardrobe if you look after them. We see two-year old sails that look new, as well as the relatively new ones that are virtually gone and we do know why it is so! Not only will they last longer if you treat them well, they will hold their shape far better. We valet a lot of our client’s sails. We go to the boat to collect them, clean them, and roll them up and then put under the loft floor, where it has the added benefit of also being the correct temperature for storage,’ said Carl somewhat emphatically.


In a very interesting aside, Carl commented, ‘Contrary to popularly held thought, white kites are not made from lighter fibres than coloured ones. We’re a little tired of all the new ones being white too. Perhaps we have been forgetting to ask our clients what colour they would like, so I promise we’ll make a concerted effort from now on to ask you and please make sure you remember to make your new ‘chute more personalised!’

‘Divisions Two and Three are simply so marvellous because of the colours and patterns. Yes. They are cool, especially when green with a big white Q in the middle of them’, Carl finished by saying.

So before you throw your money at anything, determine the best mix for you by getting the jump-start and utilise Quantum’s experience from their development program. Call Quantum and see what dedication to cause and a massive global Intellectual Property pool can help you do with the four main things in sail making – timing, quality, dependability and value.

Ultimately, it comes down to making your $100 notes count. Start the process at www.quantumsails.com.au and find the loft nearest to you.

PredictWind.comMackay BoatsSelden 660x82

Related Articles

America's Cup - Dalton opens up on boat and options for next Cup
The Protocol for the 36th America's Cup will take place in Auckland on the morning of the 29th September Italian media are reporting that the announcement of the Protocol for the 36th America's Cup will take place in Auckland on the morning of the 29th September. Dalton confirmed the details of the yacht will be revealed two months later on November 30, but would not say if it will be a foiling monohull as speculated in the media.
Posted on 18 Sep
An interview with Rainer Muller about the International 6 Metre Worlds
I interviewed Rainer Muller, vice chair of the International 6 Metre Class Worlds, via email, to learn more. The 2017 International 6 Metre Class World Championships are set to unfurl off of Vancouver, Canada, from September 17-21 and will be hosted by the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club, so I caught up with event vice-chair Rainer Muller, via email, to learn more about this exciting biennial regatta that’s expected to draw 45-50 boats from eleven different nations.
Posted on 18 Sep
An interview with Shelia Graves about the IHYC's Classic Yacht Regatta
I interviewed Sheila Graves, co-chair of IHYC’s Classic Yacht Regatta, via email, to learn more about this upcoming even Indian Harbor Yacht Club’s eighth-annual Classic Yacht Regatta is set to unfurl the weekend of September 15 and 16, so I caught up with Sheila Graves, event co-chair (and a former winning sailor), via email, to learn more about this now-classic New England event.
Posted on 13 Sep
An interview with Katie Coleman Nicoll about the 2017 J/24 Worlds
I interviewed Katie Coleman Nicoll of the 2017 J/24 World’s organizing committee to learn more about this great event. This year’s J/24 Worlds will unfurl from September 15-23, 2017 on the waters of Canada’s Lake Ontario and will be hosted by the Port Credit Yacht Club on the lake’s northwestern shores. I interviewed Katie Coleman Nicoll, secretary/treasurer of the Canadian J/24 class and a member of the 2017 J/24 World Championship’s organizing committee, via email, to learn more about this exciting event.
Posted on 11 Sep
Pulling G’s with Beneteau – Pt II
Just a little while ago we pulled some Gs with Beneteau’s Mr Product, aka G3. Just a little while ago we pulled some Gs with Beneteau’s Mr Product, aka G3. You can go back and read Part One of the story of Gianguido Girotti, as and when you may like. However, for now we’ll push on with the incredible semi-foiler Figaro 3, and the new Oceanis 51.1, along with what they represent for the brand as a whole. It is a very interesting tale, especially as Beneteau...
Posted on 31 Aug
A conversation with Jay Keeshan about the SYC's 2017 Vineyard Race
I caught up with Jay Keeshan, vice chair for the 2017 Vineyard Race, via email, to learn more about this classic race. This year’s Vineyard Race is set to unfurl on Friday, September 1, and will likely take most boats between one and three days to complete, conditions and vessels depending, of course. I caught up with Jay Keeshan, vice chairman for the 2017 Vineyard Race, via email, to learn more about this classic New England distance contest.
Posted on 28 Aug
JATO ignited as SuperFoiler prepares for take off (Pt II)
When we left SuperFoiler last time, the JATO rockets had been lit, and we were rapidly approaching the time for rotation When we left SuperFoiler last time, the JATO rockets had been lit, and we were rapidly approaching the time for rotation (lift off). You can catch up with Part One of SuperFoiler and the JATO rockets, but for now we get to talk speed, the crew on board, and finally the commercialisation of it all. Buckle up!
Posted on 28 Aug
Pulling G’s with Beneteau – Pt I
In a car, just the one G will have you straining at your seatbelt. In a car, just the one G will have you straining at your seatbelt. Over nine (+ve) in an aircraft, and without a G-suit, you will be unconscious. So at three G’s, and pulling no punches with them either, we not only enjoyed our opportunity to sit with Gianguido Girotti (G3), we got to learn a lot as well!
Posted on 23 Aug
JATO ignited as SuperFoiler prepares for take off (Pt I)
When small military transports have to take off from impossibly short runways with a belly full of cargo When small military transports have to take off from impossibly short runways with a belly full of cargo akin to Mr. Creosote, they reach for the JATO bottles. Aircraft like C-7 Caribous and LC130 Hercules strap rockets, yes rockets, to the underside of their wings to gain valuable extra thrust, which surely helps keep the pilots' heart rates below the red line.
Posted on 22 Aug
Discussing the Storm Trysail Club’s Ted Hood Regatta with Clarke Smith
I chatted with Clarke Smith, chairman for the 2017 Ted Hood Regatta, via email, to learn more about this exciting event. Given the late, great Ted Hood’s sterling reputation as both a sailor and innovator, it makes a lot of sense that the Storm Trysail Club’s Marblehead Station would create their inaugural Ted Hood Regatta (August 25-27), which will be held on the waters off of Marblehead, Massachusetts, in his honor. I corresponded with Clarke Smith, chairman for the 2017 Ted Hood Regatta, via email, to learn more.
Posted on 21 Aug