Please select your home edition
Edition
Wildwind 2016 728x90

New York to Barcelona Race - Leader losing speed in high pressure zone

by Leslie Greenhalgh on 11 Jun 2014
Safran - IMOCA Ocean Masters New York to Barcelona Race ThMartinez/Sea&Co © http://www.thmartinez.com
While long term leader of the IMOCA Ocean Masters New York to Barcelona Race, Safran, was still holding a comfortable lead at 10:30 UTC, her speed was slowly beginning to drop as she entered the periphery of the ridge. This zone of high pressure, a band of light winds located off the Portugese coast, is the last meteorological hurdle that the French IMOCA 60 and her three rivals will face before they reach Gibraltar in around two days’ time.

Over the four hours leading up to 10:30 UTC, Safran’s 17.5 knot boat speed had been 1.5 knots slower than her rivals, while her average speed over the previous 15 minutes had dropped to 15 knots, compared to Hugo Boss and Team Neutrogena’s 19.0 and 20.2 knots respectively.

Co-skipper Morgan Lagravière confirmed this morning that the wind had dropped. 'We have less wind than the others right now, but we have to accept that. We are 70 miles ahead of second, so we can't be in the same wind.'

Lagravière said that he didn’t believe Safran would escape the ridge of high pressure until early tomorrow afternoon, when northerly winds would fill in to the east of the ridge. 'We just hope it happens like that, because in light winds, anything can happen. We could be stuck and see the fleet coming back into us...' Other than predicting that their boat speed would drop and that the boats behind would catch them up to some degree, Lagravière said it was hard to make predictions.

The competition still remains hot for second with Pepe Ribes and Ryan Breymaier on Hugo Boss continuing to fend off their 5°WEST team mates, Guillermo Altadill and Jose Munoz, on Neutrogena. At 10:30 UTC Hugo Boss remained eight miles ahead, but Hugo Boss had also suffered some damage having broken some track on their mast and their spinnaker snuffer.

'It has been a lot of work as usual,' commented Breymaier. 'Guillermo is very very determined, breathing down our neck, so we have to keep the boat at 100% all of the time!' While they haven’t tried to make any repairs while they have been charging along, Breymaier says they will attempt to fix their boat once they get into the lighter winds of the ridge.

As Hugo Boss is too far ahead for him to see, ‘determined’ Guillermo Altadill says he has been glued to the race tracker, to monitor Hugo Boss’ progress. In the stronger conditions, Neutrogena has also had its share of problems. While her mainsail tear is now fixed, Altadill said that yesterday they had broken the lower running backstay on one side, which required a trip up the mast to fix.

As to their prospects today, Altadill said they had a few more hours of 20 knot sailing ahead of them before they reached the ridge. Then they would be aiming for the band of favourable northerlies directly off the Portugese coast.

'The crew that deals with that the best will have a lot of advantages,' he advised.

Bringing up the rear, Gerard Marin on GAES reported this morning that they were still enjoying 20-25 knots southwesterlies, which were shifting slightly and a calm, relatively long sea.

Since yesterday evening GAES has been sailing a few degrees higher, edging south. 'With the sail configuration that we have, we need stay further south than the others. At present out only objective is to get to Gibraltar as quickly as possible.'

He estimated GAES arrival time in the Strait as being 1200 on the 12th June.

Hugo Boss skipper Alex Thomson stood down from competing due to the arrival of his second child. The big day occurred yesterday with wife Kate giving birth to a daughter, Georgia, weighing seven pounds and seven ounces.

Everyone at the IMOCA Ocean Masters New York to Barcelona Race wishes them well.

After retiring from the IMOCA Ocean Masters New York to Barcelona Race, following their arrival in New York just a day before the start, Nandor Fa and co-skipper Marcell Goszleth have moved their brand new IMOCA 60 Spirit of Hungary up to Newport, Rhode Island. They have announced that rather than effecting repairs to their boat in the USA, they will instead ship her back home.

'In New York we made a full survey and checked everything and we found some unexpected technical problems that we couldn’t solve in New York nor Newport in terms of either time or money. So we are transporting the boat back to our workshop in our country where we can solve all our problems,' said Fa, adding that he still planned to be in Barcelona for the prizegiving on 20th Ocean Masters

PredictWind.comBarz Optics - San Juan Worlds Best EyewearWildwind 2016 660x82

Related Articles

Vendée Globe – ETAs becoming clearer for Attanasio and Colman
Conrad Colman is only 163 miles from the finish, and although under jury rig is making 6.8 knots towards the finish. Conrad Colman (Foresight Natural Energy) is only 163 miles from the finish, and although under jury rig is making 6.8 knots towards the finish. Eve though the NW’ly wind will continue to veer northerly during the night and become lighter at times later in the day tomorrow, the Crazy Kiwi hopes to arrive on Friday night.
Posted on 23 Feb
Vendée Globe – The best of Didac Costa
Didac Costa's welcome back was big. At the heart of it were the men and women of the Les Sables d'Olonne fire service. Didac Costa's welcome back to Les Sables d'Olonne was big. And at the heart of it were the men and women of the Les Sables d'Olonne fire service.
Posted on 23 Feb
RORC Caribbean 600 – Epic win for Bella Mente
Bella Mente counted 85 sail changes and at one point, both yachts were way-over canvassed, smoking along at 30 knots The lead in the Maxi72s changed hands on seven occasions during the race. Bella Mente counted 85 sail changes and at one point, both yachts were way-over canvassed, smoking along at 30 knots in a gigantic squall.
Posted on 23 Feb
Volvo Ocean Race - The 10 young sailors who impacted RTW race history
Age is just a number, right? Well, yes – according to some of the sailors who've tackled the world's toughest ocean test Age is just a number, right? Well, yes – according to some of the sailors who've tackled the world's toughest ocean test. They say 'if you're good enough, you're old enough', and this lot certainly proved that. Here, we look back at some of the most iconic young sailors in the Volvo Ocean Race and its predecessor, the Whitbread Round the World Race's four-and-a-half decade history.
Posted on 23 Feb
Vendée Globe – Vendee2020Vision – Six best solo sailors selected
Vendée2020Vision helped with the coaching and development of a 10-strong squad of Britain’s top aspirant solo skippers. While in Les Sables d’Olonne competitors continue to stream across the finish line after three and a half months at sea, in Southampton work continues to train up British sailing talent to give them the best chance of competing in the Vendée Globe in four year’s time.
Posted on 23 Feb
Extreme Sailing Series– ENGIE and Team Tilt to take wildcard challenge
Headed up by highly experienced offshore sailor, Sebastien Rogues, ENGIE come with valuable experience in the GC32 Following their participation in the inaugural GC32 Championship - also being staged in Muscat - the GC32 Racing Tour teams ENGIE and Team Tilt will compete in the Extreme Sailing Series season opener in Oman in less than two weeks' time.
Posted on 23 Feb
Invisible Hand In inshore mode – Images by Erik Simonson
Invisible Hand In inshore mode – Images by Erik Simonson Invisible Hand In inshore mode – Images by Erik Simonson
Posted on 23 Feb
Vendée Globe – Didac Costa takes 14th place
The tenacious, driven Costa succeeded with one of the smallest budgets of 29 skippers who started race on November 6th. The tenacious, driven Costa has succeeded with one of the smallest budgets of the 29 skippers who started the race on November 6th.
Posted on 23 Feb
Vendee Globe - Foresight Natural Energy Day 109 - Ancient Homer
The wind has died. The one proud mainsail drags lazily back and forth across the cabin top. The wind has died. The one proud mainsail drags lazily back and forth across the cabin top. Even the rippling laughter of the wake down the side of the hull has dulled as Foresight Natural Energy lethargically crawls across the dark disk of the horizon. The bright orange jib is the only flash of colour in a quiet world where a dull lead coloured sea lolls under a pewter sky.
Posted on 23 Feb
CCA welcomes America's fastest non-stop solo circumnavigator
The CCA is particularly proud of member Rich Wilson’s accomplishment in the just completed Vendée Globe race The Cruising Club of America is particularly proud of member Rich Wilson’s (Marblehead, Mass.) accomplishment in the just completed Vendée Globe race. Sailing solo for nearly 27,500 miles aboard Great American IV, Wilson finished the planet-rounding competition in just over 107 days, returning to the west coast of France on Tuesday February 21, 2017 after having started there on November 6, 2016.
Posted on 23 Feb