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New Manson Boss proves to be a shackle bender on test

by Richard Gladwell on 17 Mar 2013
The consequences of anchors which failed to hold in the 2010 Phuket King’s Cup Tracey Johnstone

Manson Marine completed seabed testing on their new Boss model with a 15.7kg (35lb) anchor bending two sets of shackles, and causing the test to be stopped at almost ten tonnes of load being exerted on the anchor by the powerful tug being used for live seabed testing.

'Testing began on Auckland Harbour, with 40ft (12metres) of 5/16(8mm) chain and 3/8 (9.5mm) shackles and a scope of 5:1 using a 90 tonne tug boat, says Manson's Ned Wood. 'This rig exerted up to 2000kg (4500lb) of load on the Manson Boss - but bent all the shackles in the test rig!

'Manson testing staff returned to the dock, went to a local ships chandler and bought 5/8 (15.8mm) shackles and 60ft (18metres) of smaller half inch (12.7mm) chain.

'We went back out testing on the tug again, and pulling on the 35lb (15.8kg) Manson Boss. This time testing had to stop at 4200kg (9250lb) because the 5/8 (15.8mm) shackles were all bending.

'From our tests, it would seem that the only problem you’re going to have with your new Manson Boss is that you could bend your shackles. How is that for peace of mind?' he asks.

Wood says the design brief for the new Manson Boss was focused on faster setting, with greater holding power.

A strong, reliable anchor is the most important piece of safety equipment aboard any boat, being able to stop a bad situation getting worse, and allowing a boat to hold a position until assistance arrives, or repairs can be effected.

'As well, when cruising, you sleep soundly at night,' says Wood. 'We all know there is nothing worse than your anchor dragging and having to get up at 3am and untangle your boat from the boat next door - with frayed tempers all around.'



The new Manson Boss also features a new Shackle Preventor, this quickly changes the anchor from a fixed shank anchor into a sliding shank so cruisers can anchor in rocks and coral. To dislodge a fouled anchor the skipper simply drives forward over the top of the Manson Boss and releases it.

'The Boss anchor is designed and built to work in all seabeds, it’s truly multipurpose. The high tensile steel shank has also been specifically designed to fit into the tricky through rollers on launches,' Wood explains.

Anchoring is fairly simple physics - the bigger the fluke, the more holding power the anchor has. This quality is the fundamental to the Manson Boss design which is huge for its weight. In other words the surface area of the fluke is generating more holding power than just the physical weight of the anchor.

In addition to the new Manson Boss, Manson also build the Supreme Anchor which has been winning anchoring competitions for the last seven years and is an ideal cruising anchor. Manson also have a range of Lloyd’s Register approved conventional Plough Type and Bruce Type anchors.

Manson also manufacture stainless steel anchors for cruisers who prefers the smart look of a shiny anchor on the bow of their boat.

A feature of all anchors in the Manson range is Lloyd’s Register certification which is the the most comprehensive certification an anchor can get. This includes certification that the anchor is built from Lloyds Register approved steel and by Lloyds Register approved welders.

'The new Manson Boss Anchor, offers you so much more protection, it’s certainly a cruisers best insurance policy, ' is Wood's parting quip.

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