Please select your home edition
Edition
Naiad/Oracle Supplier

London Olympics 2012 - Australians doing swimmingly

by Rob Kothe and the Sail-World team on 2 Aug 2012
Nathan Outerridge and Iain Jensen (AUS) competing today, 01.08.12, in the Men’s Skiff (49er) event in The London 2012 Olympic Sailing Competition. onEdition © http://www.onEdition.com
The 49er World Champions and red hot Olympic 49er Gold Medal favourites Nathan Outteridge and Iain (Goobs) Jensen have opened up a nice lead after six races into the Olympic series. After racing today they provided a window into their regatta.

At the bottom of this story you will discover the story of the lead photo.

Iain Jensen was first to comment. ‘Today was really good. We came away with a two and a one. We had good starts in both of them and got the first shift in both of them and didn't round the top mark in first in either of them but I think in the first we were around in seventh and the second one we rounded in third and we just ground away from there and waited for the other boats to make a mistake. That was our plan; to sail with a little bit less risk.’

Nathan Outteridge: - ‘‘Today conditions were good for us, not too much wind. It has to be over 22knots for it to be quite hairy in these boats these days and in the harbour probably the hardest thing is the gybes. Just because it is quite choppy at the bottom and if you jump a wave and it bounces on the nose it can throw the boat one way or another and gets some big helm loads and then if we are outside with the big waves just trying to go down them in a straight line in 22knots is quite difficult. Today was pretty similar to yesterday and it was relatively easy sailing - perfect conditions for a 49er.

‘Peter Burling and Blair Tuke (NZL) and ourselves have done a lot of training together over the last three or four years and we have done, I don't know how many times, we have gone up and down this harbour, neck and neck the whole way and sometimes they are a tad quicker and sometimes we are a tad quicker. The 49er is quite dependent on having the rigs set up properly, like the turnbuckles.

‘We have a chat after each day and work out who was in what and help each other out with that so they were a little quick on the first race, we were a little quick in the second race yesterday and today we were again neck and neck. I wouldn't say there was a whole lot in it but these boats are very tweaky that's for sure.

‘The Kiwis are sailing very well. We have been a little bit ahead of them in both races and we made a good pass move in the second bit of the first race but they are sailing excellently. It is exactly what we expected of them. We have got to keep on our game because the moment we make a little slip up they are going to be there to capitalise on it so we have just to keep doing our thing.

‘We are not really keeping an eye on any of the boats we are racing. We are just looking at the shifts and the general fleet and where they are and just trying to get around the first mark in the top five. ‘If we can do that in every race it probably won’t matter what everyone else does. As the days goes on they are definitely the guys to watch for sure.
‘It’s good to see Steve Morrison and Ben Rhodes on a charge today. They have got plenty of potential and we were a little shocked that they weren’t doing so well initially but today is what I expect of those guys and as we keep saying we are only six races into it. It is a long way to go and we wouldn't be surprised if they are going to be right behind us in a couple of days.


Peter Burling chimed in ‘We have the same boat speeds as Nath and Goobs. (Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen) They’ve just been better at positioning themselves in a slightly better place on the course and we kind of screwed up there on the first beat of the last race.

‘We just missed a few shifts up the first beat and went round behind a big pack in about 12 or something. Lots of guys just riding on our tail and right in front of us but had a really good run and got ourselves in a good position again.
‘It is a really long regatta and we sailed well for the first couple of days but there is still plenty more work to do but we are really happy. We haven’t had a discard yet and just knocking out some pretty low scores which has been good.’

And the reason why Outteridge was photographed with a snorkel??

The answer from the horse’s mouth: ‘ My mate Jody (Shiels from Wangi Wangi Sailing Club) has come over here to watch us race. He is probably one of our biggest supporters. Last night at dinner he said here you are, this is for you for capsizing yesterday so today you have got to wear it out there in case you swim you have got your snorkel and your goggles, so I wore it out to the start line today just trying to keep it a bit light hearted.

But we were pretty safe today. We had one little wave on one of the runs where we launched completely out of the water. We both went back and Goobs fell against me and then I went round the back of the boat but then he grabbed at me, got me high in the crutch and pulled me back on. He grinned and said ‘you are not going anywhere today.’

KZRaceFurlersGiacomo Yacht SalePredictWind.com

Related Articles

An interview with Patrick Kennedy about the Ida Lewis Distance Race
I interviewed Patrick Kennedy, chair of the 2017 ILDR, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution. With this year’s Ida Lewis Distance Race set to unfurl the weekend of August 18-20, I caught up with Patrick Kennedy, chair of the 2017 ILDR, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the event’s new partnership with the 2017 J/Fest New England.
Posted on 14 Aug
An interview with Marianne Davis about the CORK International Regatta
I interviewed Marianne Davis, co-chair of the CORK International Regatta, to learn about the regatta’s state of affairs. While the various CORK regattas' registration lists include international sailors, these events are some of the gemstones in Sail Canada’s yearly championship calendar, making them of extra importance to Canadian sailors. I recently caught up with Marianne Davis, co-chair of the 2017 event, via email, to learn more about the CORK International Regatta’s evolution and its current state of affairs.
Posted on 7 Aug
A Q&A with the RORC’s Nick Elliott about the 2017 Rolex Fastnet Race
I caught up with Nick Elliott, RORC Racing Manager, via email, to learn more about the world-famous Rolex Fastnet Race. When one stops to consider the world’s best ocean races, the Royal Offshore Racing Club’s Rolex Fastnet Race, which starts on Sunday, August 6, 2017, is never far from mind. I caught up with Nick Elliott, RORC Racing Manager, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the amount of work that goes into pulling off this world-famous regatta.
Posted on 1 Aug
Ian Walker - Musto Ambassador on the Volvo Ocean Race, America's Cup
Ian Walker on his Volvo Ocean Race win, why food and clothing are so important offshore, his views on the America's Cup We speak to Musto ambassador Ian Walker about his Volvo Ocean Race win, why food and clothing are so important offshore, his views on the America's Cup, his new desk job, sailing for fun, and 20 years of the John Merricks Sailing Trust.
Posted on 23 Jul
Black Jack Yachting. Bigger boat. Bigger team. Even bigger performance
Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus. Some were sail makers, like Skipper Mark Bradford and also Vaughan Prentice from North Sails’ Brisbane loft. Others were riggers, such as Bruce Clarke, and there are even boat builders, like Gary van Lunteren, as well as Ash Deeks.
Posted on 20 Jul
A Q&A with Tom Trujillo about the Transpacific Race’s 49th running
Sail-World interviewed Tom Trujillo, the Transpac Race’s PRO, via email to learn more about this classic bluewater race. The Transpac Race (est 1906) is in a rarefied group of four races that are considered sailing’s greatest bluewater Corinthian challenges, and it welcomes a wildly diverse fleet of bluewater-worthy boats. The 49th running of this classic race is currently underway, so Sail-World caught up with Tom Trujillo, the race’s principal race officer, via email to learn more.
Posted on 7 Jul
Gladwell's Line - America's Cup returns to its new home and thinking
Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness and will open a new era of America's Cup, New Zealand and World Sailing. A rookie crew won the most prestigious trophy in sailing, and one of the most difficult to win in any sport.
Posted on 29 Jun
SuperFoilers Are Go!
SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets in the great scheme of things, they come together in the one form as harmoniously as a Rolls Royce, and also deliver intense energy way past the sum of their parts, just like some amazing band.
Posted on 28 Jun
A Q&A with Kimball Livingston about San Francisco high school sailing
I emailed with my friend and colleague Kimball Livingtston to learn about San Francisco’s latest sailing revolution. I started hearing whispers of shifts in the San Francisco Bay high school sailing scene a couple of months ago. A few inquiries led me to my good friend and colleague Kimball Livingston, a world-class sailor, scribe, and StFYC staff commodore who isn’t one to keep his seaboots dry when the topic turns to opportunities for the next sailing generation. I caught up with KL via email to learn more.
Posted on 13 Jun
A Q&A with Andrew Howe about winning the 2015 Marion to Bermuda Race
I interviewed Andrew Howe, the 2015 Marion to Bermuda Race’s winning co-navigator, to learn more about their race. In 2015, skipper Greg Marston and the crew of Ti, a 1967 Alden Mistral, racing under celestial rules, were the overall winners of the Marion Bermuda Race Founders Division, beating boats that were enjoying GPS accuracy. On the eve of the 2017 edition of the race, I reached out to Andrew Howe, the team’s co-navigator, to gain perspective on this impressive win and hear about his 2017 plans.
Posted on 7 Jun