sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Cruising Photo Gallery Video Gallery
Sail-World.com : Gladwell's Line: Riding shotgun on Emirates Team NZ's AC72 at 43.6kts
Gladwell's Line: Riding shotgun on Emirates Team NZ's AC72 at 43.6kts

'Sail-World’s Richard Gladwell (red wet weather gear) , checks out the wingsail twist as Emirates Team New Zealand’s AC72 rips across the Hauraki Gulf at speeds of over 40kts'    Chris Cameron/ETNZ©    Click Here to view large photo

Sail-World.com's NZ and America's Cup Editor, Richard Gladwell, spent three hours perched on the after beam of Emirates Team NZ's AC72 for a training session on the Hauraki Gulf. Sailing in winds of up to 25kts, the AC72 hit an amazing 43.6kts and didn't even feel like she was breaking into a sweat. He reports on Wednesday's race and test session.

Imagine you are standing on top of an Emirates jet on that final mad charge down the runway before takeoff.

The engines are screaming and every imperfection in the runway is magnified into the jolting that reverberates through the plane just before it leaves the ground.

Next, take that mental snapshot and overlay it on to a boat the dimensions of a tennis court (well three metres wider), flying down the harbour, a couple of metres above the sea, travelling at a speed of more than 40kts.

This is the surreal world of the AC72 catamaran and the 34th America’s Cup.

Today Emirates Team New Zealand’s skipper Dean Barker is putting his crew through a seven-hour programme of race practice and testing on Auckland's Hauraki Gulf, venue for the 2000 and 2003 America's Cups.

The AC72 is a boat like you’ve never seen or experienced before.

New Zealand has just emerged from her hangar, where she has been modified to incorporate changes from her first 16 days of trialling. The America’s Cup rules allow just 30 days of test sailing before January 31, 2013

Emirates Team New Zealand’s AC72 flies upwind at 20kts finishing a racing session on the Hauraki Gulf -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

We came across the black hulled, red bowed catamaran flying upwind in a stiff 15kt offshore breeze, as she finished her race practice session. She’s setting a very short hoist jib, the smallest in her inventory. The 40metre tall wingsail, longer than an Emirates A380 wing, is doing all the work.

Richard Gladwell with Dean Barker. Emirates Team New Zealand ACA72 testing on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©  
The first impression is of a very stiff platform (multihull-speak for the combination of hulls, beams, deck and supporting truss underneath the 40metre tall wingsail). There was no twisting. The whole boat is a single locked unit, as she charges into the moderate sea.

Next take is the body language of the crew, almost motionless in the boat, only occasionally moving the pump (winch) handles to adjust the sheet on the wingsail, or pressure up the hydraulics. Dean Barker guides rather than steers with minimal wheel movement. The AC72 sails smooth and fast – like the flying machine she is.

The crew have been on the water since just after 8am.

This is the tail end of the day’s racing phase where Emirates Team NZ simulates an America’s Cup course, complete with marks, and run through a race scenario complete with pre-start, fast reach and then the beats to windward and downwind legs, all within the constraints of the America’s Cup course boundaries. 'It’s a test of crew-work,' explains team boss Grant Dalton, as we clamber aboard. 'It went very well this morning.'

Aboard, our roller coaster phobia kicks in. We don’t like roller coasters – too much of the hang on, trust it knows where it is going, and won’t fly off the rails. The AC72 initially that feels like that. Does man control the machine, or will the machine control man?

We’ll soon find out.

Skipper Dean Barker has a very light touch on the wheel of the AC72 during the race session aboard Emirates Team New Zealand AC72 on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

Sitting still in the water in the AC72 means you are sailing at about eight knots. Full blast, as we were to soon find out, is about 43.6kts. But at that speed who is counting?.

The acceleration is enough to knock you flat, so you sit down and hang on to something solid or it’s over the back you go.

Today’s breeze is 20-25kts, a mix of rain squalls and sunshine. A typical Auckland southwesterly, offshore breeze.

A flick of the wheel and we are off. First on a short reach and then the gennaker is broken out and we begin the first screaming, shuddering charge downwind, climbing on to the leeward foil with consummate ease.

It’s a wild ride, but a good one.

The screaming sound is coming from the tail fin on the windward rudder. The faster you go the higher pitched the scream from the rudder. Then as it breaks free of the surface there is a blissful nanosecond of silence, giving a silent awesome flight, as though you are riding on the back of a giant mythical seabird swooping over the ocean.

Aside from the rudder scream, there’s no other noise on board. No creaking or groaning. No shouts between the crew. That takes a bit of getting used to as well.

The AC72 is wet and dry. Our position in the centre of the boat is dry. To windward the crew is in the firing line for water flying into the air as the tip of the windward foil kisses the water, throwing back a massive shower of spray, Southern Ocean style. Full wet weather gear is required.

Ray Davies sprints across the tramp during a gybe. The trick is stopping when you reach the other side -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

The mad runners

Suddenly one crew-member leaves his station and races over to the leeward hull, running a springing, moon-walking, step across the trampoline netting.

Another follows and then another, and you realise something is up.

The mad runners’ only problem is stopping when they reach the leeward side and are running downhill. The tall grinders, with their high centre of gravity are the worst, almost falling over the side. There’s no fence, just a mad grab for a pump handle to check themselves. This is definitely a boat for shorties.

A gybe is coming.

The lack of crew talk seems very weird until you realise they all talk through a networked on-board radio system in their helmets - which have little cigarette packet sized radios laminated into the helmet back. Outwardly the crew appears to communicate by mental telepathy. Reality is that communication is very clear – until someone has an audio failure in their helmet.

Emirates Team New Zealand AC72 testing on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo
Mid-gybe we actually drop off the foils as the speed plummets to 20kts, then turn complete, we’re off on another wild ride hitting speeds in the high 30’s early 40kts.

Our roller coaster phobia has eased - replaced by technical curiosity.

Are we going to nosedive? Not even close. Lying down on the deck peering through the netting at the leeward bow, it’s well clear of the water, and stays that way.

About 10nm offshore the fast, hard ride ends, the gennaker is furled and dropped. It is time to head upwind. There is a bit of a discussion in the back of the boat about an approaching squall. A few calls ashore reveal the wind will increase by only five knots or so.

Time to sheet on and go again.

Upwind there is no foiling, the AC72 just sails like a catamaran at speeds of about 20kts plus. That gives an apparent windspeed of about 46kts according to the number crunchers at the back – we’d guessed at 50kts - based on the wind in our face. The speed and motion of the boat, combined with the storm strength apparent wind requires you to keep a low profile, or risk being blown over.

The foils do have some effect, lifting the leeward hull – visually lowering the waterline, but she still sails with part of the hull immersed.

The degree of twist in the wingsail leech is just jaw-dropping.

There are over a thousand customised components in the wingsail which consists of two elements. The degree of control is such that the wingsail can be twisted in both the front and back elements, and individual sections, so the sail is almost like a soft mainsail – allowing the rig to be powered and depowered quickly, or just set for a particular windstrength.

Everything seems to be working incredibly well, and we start wondering what these guys are going to do for the next eight months.

That line of thinking is about to come to a sudden end.

The acceleration and 50kts of apparent wind require you to hang on tightly or be flicked over the aft beam - Emirates Team New Zealand AC72 testing on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

Foiling upwind?
We’re lying down admiring at this 40 metre structure working, almost breathing, in the breeze, when out of the corner of our eye we see the AC72 has climbed on to the leeward foil. Upwind foiling? Wow!

Quickly Dean Barker reigns in his frisky mare, dropping her on to the stern and stopping the boat. From the startled look on his face you can see that this feature wasn’t in the Owner’s Manual.

Another quick discussion, and it seems that the new fairing on the main beam has worked a little too well, making the AC72 literally take off, as it generates lift in the Force 10 apparent wind.

We set off again, powering up the rest of the leg at a more pedestrian 18kts. Again the AC72 takes flight in a rain squall, before once again being dropped back on her haunches.

At the top of the course, the decision is made to remove the fairing behind the main beam, which has been designed in an aerofoil shape, like a plane wing. But it has worked too well, taking the AC72 from sailing, into foiling and then into the realm of full flight.

While the fairing is cut away, it’s time for a look around and a bit of a chat.

First this AC72 is an incredibly simple boat. She has been designed that way because of the reduced crew numbers. There are just 11 crew instead of the 17 on the monohulls used in the previous editions of the America’s Cup.

The jib is on a self tacker – one less adjustment to make in a tack. The mainsheet is just a single sheet leading from the winch to the end of the wingsail.

Emirates Team New Zealand.The Y-Truss structure, with carbon cables almost as thick as your arm locks the platform on the AC72 -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo
The truss below the platform deck is what gives the AC72 her rigidity. There is carbon cable under there that is almost as thick as your arm.

There are no running backstays. The backstays are almost fixed, but are eased slightly downwind.

With the fairing removed, from the starboard side only, it’s time for another run and a beat.

We look through the decking at the leeward bow as we sail through the Zone of Death accelerating from 10kts to close to 40kts. (Typically as any high performance yacht or catamaran bears away from the wind and rapidly accelerates the bow dips, sometimes submerging, and very occasionally turning into a full nosedive as so often seen in the smaller AC45’s).

There’s none of this submarining with the AC72. The knuckle of the bow is clear. The foils do their job and we’re up, up and away again.

Ten miles out we turn again – having hit between 41 and almost 44kts depending on whether you believe the analyst’s computer or the crew readouts. Oddly enough New Zealand doesn’t feel that pressed - about three-quarter pace - and gives the impression that there was still more untapped speed potential.

The crew look remarkably relaxed, and there’s no edginess or talk of being even close to the limit – wherever that might be.

We turn upwind again. Has the removal of the fairing done the trick?

That’s what months and months of development testing and incremental gain are all about. The sum of those little things uncovered in testing will add up to a significant edge, come the Louis Vuitton and America’s Cup regattas. Time is the scarce commodity. More testing time should give more speed refinements.

Emirates Team NZ heads upwind into 25kt winds and rain squalls. The AC72 just hurtles up the course in these conditions - an amazing piece of sailing engineering. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

Upwind in 50kts apparent

The AC72 starts another run upwind. You can feel the crew applying the pressure now. She’s more loaded, but with no sign of the dreaded lift off. The design and engineering magnificence of this AC72 comes to the fore as she hurls herself up the course into an approaching rain squall, in 50kts of apparent wind.

Five minutes up the track there’s a crack from the lower wingsail.

Barker stops instinctively. The crew all turn to the source of the noise, and then to a man, all look skywards. Nothing is descending from the Heavens. The relief is palpable.

The bang is the sound of a wing rib fracturing. A consequence of some of the changes made while the AC72 was in the shed. Loads have shifted.

The crew are constantly wet with spray from the tip of the daggerboard when it clips the surface of the sea. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo
After another discussion, the decision is made to sail some more on the other tack, at reduced load and take the pressure off the broken rib.

'It’s not big deal,' reports Dalton back to Barker, after a close look and a chat. 'We should have picked up that it could happen. We need to look at a few other things too,' he adds.

'It’s a three hour repair,' Dalton says later of the broken rib. 'We could have fixed it overnight and gone sailing tomorrow, but won’t because there’s supposed to be another front coming through.'

Five minutes later, and we are a lot closer to Auckland. New Zealand picks up a tow line from the chase boat and heads for home at 25kts. Session over, but there’s now plenty on the work and learning list.

Shoe-horning the AC72 into her berth in Auckland’s Viaduct harbour is not easy. 'We’ve never done it before in this strength and direction of breeze,' confides Dalton on the way up the Waitemata harbour.

The tow is dropped off Prince’s Wharf and we experience the power and pace of the AC72 for one last time as Barker lines New Zealand up for an incredibly small gap in the sea wall.

The two 'tugs' – specially designed inflatables with central rotating Yamaha outboards are hitched up and do all the sideways work. The main chase boat is lashed alongside too. Her four 300hp Yamahas at the ready if the AC72 gets caught in a gust and takes charge.

The berthing operation goes smoothly, including two sideways shunts though the hole in the seawall and then under the Viaduct Bridge.

The sun comes out. The wind has dropped in the shelter of the harbour. A mass of chase boat, design and shore crew swarm aboard and the debriefings start. It’s a happy excited group.

This has been a very good day, an unbelievable experience. But there’s a long way to go before this team’s America’s Cup campaign is signed off.

Emirates Team New Zealand during an earlier testing the AC72 on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo


by Richard Gladwell

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=103801

4:22 AM Thu 15 Nov 2012GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.

Click for further information on
2013 America's Cup

Related News Stories:

15 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Artemis Racing sails for first time in San Francisco
13 Nov 2012  Fly Emirates Business Class to Europe and support NZ Optimist Coaching
13 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ out of shed after turbo-charging
11 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ AC72 gets ready for Round 2 of testing
10 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ goes for the high jump
10 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Luna Rossa trains on the Hauraki Gulf
09 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ - getting from side to side
08 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ's Nick Holroyd on the design process
05 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Images of the Artemis Racing launch and christening
04 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Luna Rossa - Questions from the NZ sailing media
MORE STORIES ...






News - USA and the World

On a high octane first day of the ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami on Monday (26 January) Giles Scott, Alison Young and the Paralympian Sonar trio of John Robertson, Hannah Stodel and Steve Thomas saw the best possible start to their 2015 sailing seasons with double race victories. ... [more]  

On Day 1 of the ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami, Presented by Sunbrella, America's premier Olympic and Paralympic classes regatta, featured the full range of what sailing in Miami has to offer. Over 850 sailors enjoyed strong breeze for the duration of the day, in addition to a brief but powerful rainstorm. ... [more]  

ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami - Giles Scott (GBR) said last week that he hoped his unbeaten run would continue, and based on Monday’s form at the Sailing World Cup Miami, the 2014 World and European Finn Champion is giving it a pretty good shot ... [more]  

ISAF Olympic classes regatta Miami 2015 images provided by photographer Ingrid Abery. ... [more]  

On the opening day of racing at ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami, presented by Sunbrella, it was sunny and bright. It was storming and raining sideways. It was sunny and bright. ... [more]  

RC44 World Championship Leg 1 gets underway on 24th March until 29th March 2015. The RC 44 Class is unlike any 40 foot sailing yacht ever designed, and the reason for that is simple. She is a high performance one design yacht created for top level racing in international regattas. If one was to compare this concept to racing cars, then we would be talking about the F1, NASCAR or similar. ... [more]  

Team Alvimedica won a Leg 3 podium place in China after some of the closest racing ever seen in the history of the Volvo Ocean Race. The Turkish-American team protected their position in the final stretch to Sanya, carefully navigating a course peppered with fishing boats along the Vietnamese coast and across the South China Sea to cap off a well-sailed leg to clinch third. ... [more]  

The finish of Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean Race in Sanya, China just before noon on January 27, 2015 marked an unbelievable end to a magnificent leg for Dongfeng Race Team. After leading the fleet virtually all the way from Abu Dhabi to Sanya in China, over more than 5,000 miles of intense ocean racing, Dongfeng finally crossed the finish line in first place ... [more]  

Winner of Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean Race, Dongfeng, have released footage taken from a drone launched from the Volvo Ocean Race yacht, as she sails in light airs on the last days of Leg 3 of the race. It is believed to be the first time a drone, launched from a competitor, has been used in a major ocean race. ... [more]  

World sailing history was created earlier today when Dongfeng Race Team became the first Chinese yacht to have a win in a premier trans-ocean racing event. Her win was also a first in the 41-year history of the Volvo Ocean Race. At 1131hrs UTC the Chinese flagged entry emphatically won Leg 3 in their home port of Sanya to take the overall leadin the 40,000nm event with six stages to go. ... [more]  

On the morning of the 26th of January, the Maersk Line ship MV Stockholm delivered the Team Vestas Wind's damaged VO65 to the port in Genoa, Italy. From here she will be taken to the Persico building facilty where the rebuild of the wrecked boat will be undertaken. The team's goal is to rejoin the race in Lisbon, Portugal in June, 2015. ... [more]  

Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Group is considering backing Sir Ben Ainslie’s America’s Cup bid, in a move that would propel the fortunes of the Olympic gold medallist yet further. Sir Ben is believed to have asked the Virgin billionaire to consider backing the venture when he and his new wife, Georgie Thompson, spent time on Sir Richard’s Necker Island in January. ... [more]  

To the 91st 2015 Bell's Beer Bayview Mackinac Race significant changes have been made in order to enhance the race experience, and by the looks of it, sailors are embracing them wholeheartedly. ... [more]  

Alpari World Match Racing Tour - Monsoon Cup preview by Alpari World Match Racing Tour
The final event of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour, Monsoon Cup Malaysia, is to take place in its new home of Johor, the southernmost state of Malaysia, over 10th-14th February. In addition to being the grand finale of the Tour, the event will also see the 2014 ISAF Match Racing World Champion crowned. ... [more]  

In the Barcelona World Race the two lead boats are preparing for a gruelling 3,500-mile game of chase across the Southern Ocean, until the next natural gateway of the course, Cape Leeuwin in south-west Australia. ... [more]  

Quantum Key West Race Week provided the opportunity for the GC32s to make a spectacular debut in the USA. During the five days of racing held in balmy temperatures off the southernmost tip of Florida, crews experienced a range of conditions. ... [more]  

40 year old Charles Caudrelier the skipper of race leader Dongfeng was a major figure of the winning French team Groupama in 2011-12 . With the Dongfeng team now approaching Sanya, almost unstoppable, its worthwhile hearing from Volvo Ocean Race CEO Knut Frostad who is hugely pleased with the current on water situation. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race. The northerly drag race continues, with the stable light wind forecast to drop slightly. The boats have all remained in position, if anything cementing their places with gaps between them increasing slightly through the night. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race Leg 3 - Sailing in a straight line was never supposed to be as tense as this. We’ve been pointing at Sanya for almost a day now and fortunately, Alvimedica, MAPFRE, and Brunel far enough back to not be in AIS range anymore. The problem is they’re not in AIS range anymore. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race Leg 3 - After what can only be described as a frustrating few days of wind and current conditions in the Malacca Strait, the shipping lanes we had to pass were a bit more entertaining as it was upwind which meant some tacking. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race: Leg 3 Finish - Video - Delayed feed by Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com/nz
Tune in here to see the finish of Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean race in Sanya. Will sailing history be made? Can Dongfeng become the first Chinese flagged yacht to win a Leg in a Round the World Race? ... [more]  

2015 ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami - Bigger than ever in 2015, with an atmosphere crackling with adrenaline, the ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami, Presented by Sunbrella, was ground zero on Sunday as competitors from 63 countries made their final preparations. ... [more]  

The Chinese entry Dong looks set to create sailing sailing history when she finishes first on Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean Race, Sanya in two days time. Includes video Currently Dongfeng is 250 nm to the finish line in Sanya and the chasing pack with ADOR ahead in second place 55+ nm behind the Chinese team. ... [more]  

The first of the iconic Great Capes has been passed in the Barcelona World Race with Cheminées Poujoulat rounding the Cape of Good Hope earlier this morning. Bernard Stamm and Jean Le Cam passed 20°E around 400 miles south of Cape Agulhas – the southernmost tip of Africa – at 0935am (UTC) today and have begun the Indian Ocean leg of their race around Antarctica. ... [more]  

The Classic 18fters were racing again on Saturday on Sydney harbour. Michael Chittenden caught the action from a shore vantage point. ... [more]  

When race leader Dongfeng rounded Singapore 60+ nautical miles ahead of the chasing pack, it looked like the final 1200 miles of Leg three would be a procession but over the last day, the Volvo Ocean race leg from Abu Dhabi to Sanya China appears to have tightened incredibly. ... [more]  

US Sailing and Rolex USA announced last week that the 2014 Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year is Stephanie Roble. Her accomplishments on the water last year were recognized by the selection panel for her versatility; her accomplishments as a skipper and as a crew; and her competitive successes on a variety of platforms, sailing against both men and women. ... [more]  

Barcelona World Race - The first of the Great Capes is fast-approaching, with the leading boats in the Barcelona World Race expected to pass the longitude of the Cape of Good Hope at the tip of South Africa tomorrow. As they pass 20°E, the Atlantic Ocean will deliver its verdict – did Cheminées Poujoulat’s east-bound track or Neutrogena’s southerly gamble pay off? ... [more]  

Mardi Gras may not be for another month but US Sailing’s National Sailing Programs Symposium (NSPS) kicked it off early for Oakcliff Sailing this year. This evening, Oakcliff received The Captain Joe Prosser Award, given to an organization that has made an exemplary contribution toward improving the quality and safety in the training or instruction of sailors. ... [more]  

The 35th St. Maarten Heineken Regatta has already attracted entries from 20 different countries: Antigua, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Dominican Republic, Estonia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Puerto Rico, Russia, St.Maarten, Uruguay, USA and the US Virgin Islands. ... [more]  

The world is watching. Can Dongfeng Race Team hold onto their 57 nautical miles lead to China for what will essentially be the ultimate home victory? Or will another team get desperate and make a bold decision that could cost Dongfeng their win? ... [more]  

Most of the marque classes at Quantum Key West Race Week 2015 came down to the last day of the regatta, which delivered the toughest conditions of the week. Howling winds and rough seas challenging the competitors on Friday, forcing the top contenders to raise their game in order to claim overall victory. ... [more]  

Barcelona World Race - Sport met science today on the Barcelona World Race when the pairs of skippers took the first opportunity to deploy their data monitoring Argo beacon which was given to them in Bareclona prior to the start. ... [more]  

2015 Quantum Key West Race Week - Day 5
Mount Gay Round Barbados Race – Gala prizegiving marks end of event
2015 Quantum Key West Race Week - Day 5 images by Ingrid Abery
Volvo Ocean Race Leader - Dongfeng - the right place at the right time
ISAF Youth Match Racing World Championship - Notice Of Race online
Currently doing scheduled maintenance.
Volvo Ocean Race: Changes to Team Vestas Wind crew
McDougall+McConaghy Moth Worlds: Highlight video released
America's Cup: Oracle crew mate lodges complaint against Tienpont
2015 Quantum Key West Race Week - Day 4 images by Ingrid Abery
2015 ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami - US Sailing Team preview
Quantum Key West Race Week 2015 - A great day
Volvo Ocean Race: Jump seat and Pro-Am race spots up for auction
Lauderdale Olympic Classes Regatta overall
Volvo Ocean Race - Dongfeng? Race Team suffer? damage
America's Cup: Italy to host first America's Cup World Series regatta
Breeze and Sunshine at Quantum Key West Race Week
Images of the Millennium Cup and Bay of Islands Sailing Week - Day 1:
2015 Mount Gay Rum Round Barbados Race – Three records broken
St.Maarten Heineken Regatta - Simplified logistics and fun themes
2015 Quantum Key West Race Week - Day 3 images by Ingrid Abery   
Millennium Cup: Racing in the picturesque Bay of Islands   
Volvo Ocean Race - Up up and away   
Barcelona World Race - 'Haves' and 'Have Nots'   
Volvo Ocean Race Leg 3 update from Jack Bouttell onboard Dongfeng   
ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami - Game time!   
Extreme Sailing Series™ 2015 – Ninth year ready to rock!   
Foiling GC32s Key West Race Week images by Ingrid Abery   
Mount Gay Rum Round Barbados Race - Crews prepare for big race   
2015 Quantum Key West Race Week - Day 2   
2015 Quantum Key West Race Week - A challenging day   
America's Cup: Spithill leads Oracle reconnaissance team in Bermuda   
Extreme Sailing Series announces new teams and venues for 2015   
Barcelona World Race - Leaders enter the fastest section of the course   
Martinique Surf Pro - Must attend event in the world surfing circuit   
New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup preview   
RORC Caribbean 600 proving irresistible   
18ft Skiffs: Images from NSW Championships - Race 2   
Volvo Ocean Race – Malacca Nightmare – now it’s a boat race again!!   
2015 Annapolis to Newport Race - Battle for Surflant Prize   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL WAS US
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT