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Heavyweight boat choice.

Printed From: Yachts and Yachting Online
Category: General
Forum Name: Choosing a boat
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URL: http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=13212
Printed Date: 22 Aug 19 at 12:36pm
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Topic: Heavyweight boat choice.
Posted By: Dangerousday
Subject: Heavyweight boat choice.
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 9:42am
Starting to get the itch for another dinghy. Not had one for around 5 years, though now had last 2 full seasons of windsurfing and will probably carry on over winter to some extent this year.

Me: 50+ years 100+kg. Sailing 40 years, on and off. Inland sailing. Maybe a bit of Club racing, but not something I've done much of so not a high priority.
Thoughts:
Last boat was an ancient Phantom - obvious choice. Could politely be called 'composite', in that someone had taken an old wood boat and put a layer of chopped strand GRP around it to hold it together. Still leaked. But it only cost me £200 (with trolley+trailer) and I got 2 seasons out of it before the mast overcame the two pit-prop bits of dunnage under the foredeck holding it up. Walked away from it, leaving the guy wanting the mast to dispose of the hull Smile. Not even convinced the mast was a Phantom one and the track was split over 2' as well. Sail controls - didn't bother too much as it looked more fitted bedsheet than sail.
Another one isn't really grabbing me. I'm sure a plastic one will be much, much better, but all those adjustments? I like the windsurf rig simplicity - crank on downhaul. More wind - crank on more downhaul. Even more wind - use smaller sail. Then crank on more downhaul Smile

RS300/Blaze are both boats I've fancied, however a long time ago, however when they first appeared I'd already put down a deposit on an MX-Ray. Had it for a long time, even though it was evident I was too big for it and it was a complete dog upwind - was an effort not to get passed by Toppers. Downwind though Tongue. Could not quite give it up as the 1 minute downwind was addictive enough to help me forget about the previous 10 minutes upwind to get there.

I also used to solo an old wood N12, ok in lighter air, bit much once it started to pick up.
Don't want asymmetric. Just heres a couple of double handers where I sail, but can't really see it with sailing singlehanded - been there with the MX-Ray. Too much faff and in decent wind I'll probably be on a shortboard anyway.
Blaze Halo seems a good option, but perhaps won't get best out of it on a small pond?
So I'm leaning towards an RS300  I'm probably too heavy for it to be competitive, but can't travelling to events anyway. looks to be a simple enough rig, and I suspect it will be quick and fun where I sail. Hull looks same general shape as MX-Ray. There seem to be a lot of internet photos of the hull, mostly with the sailor on the board righting it. Summer has mostly been light winds - often resorted to getting the SUP out instead. I even gave one of the juniors in a Topper a tow back in one afternoon. RS300 decent in light stuff? Once it gets to 15-16knot it'll be shortboard time anyway.

RS300/Phantom both seem available for around 3k.

Any other suggestion?




Replies:
Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 10:03am
Are you limited with the budget? If not consider the H2, relatively new device but getting some traction, personally I'm not heavy neither am I tall enough to climb up the sides of an Rs300 going through the tack but once there the only thing I could think of was the shortest route back to the dock a truly horrible boat reminded me of sailing Div 2 without the stability.

I'm a great fan of the modern Phantoms too big for me, but my windsurfing mate rides one and hardly ever stacks it and we get out in quite big seas from time to time. You don't want a Blaze, heavy, you have to sit on a bar and the rig is crap, there's another ex windsurfer here who uses one but I'm sure he's just gone mental, been doing Spice apparently.

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Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 10:08am
One of our members sails an Enterprise solo he is about your weight, never seen him go in, sails in all winds.


Posted By: turnturtle
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 10:30am
My advice is to try and find an older Finn.... they are truly wonderful boats if youíre carrying a bit of weight.   Youíve got your windsurf kit for planing winds, so might as well find a boat which excels in displacement mode.... and Finns do that beautifully.  

The H2 looks like an option, but Iíd demo first.... Iíve heard theyíre a bit marmite.


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 10:39am
Originally posted by turnturtle



My advice is to try and find an older Finn.... they are truly wonderful boats if youíre carrying a bit of weight. † Youíve got your windsurf kit for planing winds, so might as well find a boat which excels in displacement mode.... and Finns do that beautifully. †
The H2 looks like an option, but Iíd demo first.... Iíve heard theyíre a bit marmite.



Whatever you do, don't listen to this person regarding Finns, we're trying to plan an intervention, we're not sure what happened, a knock to the head possibly, the only good thing about a Finn is the rising price of scrap metal for that centreboard.

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https://www.corekite.co.uk/snow-accessories-11-c.asp" rel="nofollow - Snow Equipment Deals      https://www.corekite.co.uk" rel="nofollow - New Core Kite website


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 11:51am
Originally posted by iGRF

Originally posted by turnturtle



My advice is to try and find an older Finn.... they are truly wonderful boats if youíre carrying a bit of weight.   Youíve got your windsurf kit for planing winds, so might as well find a boat which excels in displacement mode.... and Finns do that beautifully.  
The H2 looks like an option, but Iíd demo first.... Iíve heard theyíre a bit marmite.



Whatever you do, don't listen to this person regarding Finns, we're trying to plan an intervention, we're not sure what happened, a knock to the head possibly, the only good thing about a Finn is the rising price of scrap metal for that centreboard.
Thought Finn sailors built up some sort of immunity to knocks to the head getting under the boom?
3k is about all I can manage, probably more than I can manage if the Domestic Goddess finds out, especially if she finds out how much I've spent on a new rig and board this year. The H2 does look nice though.
I'm actually being sensible for a change and wanting something that will work for me and where I sail. MX-Ray was because it looked quick in the ads and on a trolley. Suppose its an age thing, like the car is now. Need:carry w/s gear, reasonable to run and buy. Solution: Toyota Avensis estate  - best fit for needs locally. What I actually wanted was a 2 seat convertible.


Posted By: Gordon 1430
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 12:25pm
You wont believe the difference in a decent Phantom compared with what you had.
Ones at 3k will have older carbon rigs so less need to fiddle with the lowers, so rake and kicker are king, Cunningham really just to take a few creases out unless blowing stupid then crank it on and forget.
A 300 would be fine but I would suggest on a really small pond you wont get the best out of a Blaze they seem to take a bit longer to get moving. 300 a challenge to sail but those that have got to grips with it love them.


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Gordon
Phantom 1430


Posted By: turnturtle
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 2:01pm
I wonder if Nessa is still selling her Hadron (H2 forerunner, grandfathered for class events).... Iíll message her on Facebook as she doesnít follow this forum anymore due to the overt antagonism she received.


Posted By: turnturtle
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 2:07pm
Yes she is... Iíve messaged her, expect an incoming guest appearance....


Posted By: Fatboi
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 2:40pm
What about an older OK? Bit like the finn but more manageable. 


Posted By: winging it
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 6:25pm
I do indeed have H1 still for sale.  Itís a perf ct boat for someone of a fuller figure but who is finding they are perhaps less nimble than they used to be.  It is a quick boat, especially in a blow where at 90kg Iím definitely Italy not heavy enough.  But I think the main advantage is that you never need to kneel.  The buoyancy down the centre line makes a perfect sitting place when itís light, unlike the phantom or the RS300.  Itís also very easy to right following capsize, another plus for those of us in our middle years.

Somehow I find myself also owning a Finn, a woodie deep cockpit phantom, an OK and a D one.  The full st of big person boats!  My favourite is the D one.  I am the right weight for it, it is a joy to sail and there is enough racing to match my free time.  My nextfavourite is the Finn but I am really too light for it, so it will most likely be for sale too.  I got use of the class demo OK for their Nationals this year and loved it so much I bought one with two rigs so I can use it for both cvrda racing and class racing.  This all means that poor H1 is a bit surplus to requirements.  That being said, Iím really only selling because I want to buy a better car.

If I can work out how to post a pic I will, but be.iece me, itís a pretty, pretty boat.  £3500 with a very decent combi trailer.


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the same, but different...



Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 14 Nov 18 at 7:31pm
Originally posted by winging it

I do indeed have H1 still for sale. †Itís a perf ct boat for someone of a fuller figure


OK.. speaking as the actual Fuller shape, which currently is 67 kgs of lean mean trapezing machine, anything else, is clinical obesity.. just saying.

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Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 15 Nov 18 at 5:43am
Thanks for all the replies - more to consider. H1 sounds interesting, though I'm working in Germany at moment and not back in UK till a few days before Xmas, so no immediate rush. 
More than a little annoying that I've got mates who are making most of some decent sailing weather on both board and boat and I can't.
I'll keep a watch on apolloduck and see if anything turns up there too. Theres always ebay too, but finding anything on in among hundreds of inflatable tenders...


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 15 Nov 18 at 8:51am
Ex (almost) windsurfer here.

The Blaze is probably not the best boat for you (though we all know iGRF still regrets selling his). It's not perfect, especially on a small lake and is optimised for stronger winds but I sail mine both inland and on the sea. With your budget, though, and sailing only inland, I would be leaning towards a Phantom (were I a little bigger, 5' 6" and 76kg doesn't hack it). Or Nessa's H1 looks beautiful if you want something a little different from the norm.


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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 15 Nov 18 at 12:52pm
Had a feeling that would be the case with the Blaze. The clubs board gps speed freaks (which isn't me..yet) don't take long to cover the length of it ( http://nlhsc.org.uk/home.html" rel="nofollow - linky ). Which is why I was discounting asymmetric boats.

Winds have been poor for the board this year when I've had the time. Did take the clubs old Mistral IMCO board out a couple of times when it was light for giggles - the glide compared to a not-quite planing shortboard is quite addictive. There was some board course racing, well, around 3 of them, last year, as I've not seen them think they've just gone back to blasting.

Finn, Phantom, RS300 look to go OK in light stuff. I had told myself  'no wood' but that H1...Tongue. Even looks like a bit of the N12 I had in that hull.


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 15 Nov 18 at 1:05pm
Blaze is a great boat, I love mine, but if I was only sailing light winds on a small lake I would almost certainly have something else. Our lake is around 1 mile long so the Blaze is not too confined but I race and it's still hard to sail it to it's PN on there.

H1 (and H2) definitely has some Merlin in it's DNA.


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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: jeffers
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 7:10am
Having sailed a Blaze on a small pond (50 acres or so of usable water) I can confirm they don't perform to their potential unless it is windy.

Nessas H1 is nice, I have sailed it on said small pond as well as a H2 (the only thing with those 2 boats is the central tank to step over, practice would sort that though).

My personal ride at the minute is a D-Zero though, I am over the 90kg mark these days and there are sailors in the fleet who are over 100kgs who are competitive in most conditions so perhaps another boat to consider?


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Paul
----------------------
D-Zero GBR 74
D-Zero GBR188 https://www.facebook.com/groups/dinghies/permalink/2384300638276034/?sale_post_id=2384300638276034" rel="nofollow - For Sale
Ex Laser/8.1
Ex


Posted By: rich96
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 8:59am
A 1980s/90s Finn with a carbon rig is the way to go.

Way more comfortable than a Phantom, better suited to your weight than an OK, D Zero, 300, Blaze etc(especially sailing inland).

Every Finn is slightly different and they are addictive. Totally refined after decades of development from the worlds best sailors.

It feels like a privilege to sail one.



Posted By: Fatboi
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 11:18am
Looks like a cracking option to me - https://www.okdinghy.co.uk/classifieds/2062/

With Burt weighing in at almost 120kgs and being competitive I would say you fit well within the competitive weight band but if your not racing then that almost doesn't matter.
Loads of space for you in the deep cockpit it could work well for you. 


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 11:27am
I've not sailed an OK, in fact I don't believe I've ever come across one in the flesh so to speak, but look at that link I couldn't help noticing the centreboard is well up front in the forward deck area and you sit aft in a cockpit, how does that work?
Everyone knows the optimum sailing position is just ahead of the centre of lateral resistance which on an OK would put you up on the deck, they must be really awkward to sail sat back there. Or am I missing something?

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Posted By: Fatboi
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 12:15pm
I don't know the science, but considering in a Finn, OK, Solo, D-One, Optimist, Topper, Laser and Phantom you sit behind the front edge of the board I am not sure that is correct. 


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 12:43pm
iGRF,
Think it's because it's cat rigged, look how far forward mast is, think where centre of effort is.


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 12:55pm
Originally posted by Fatboi

I don't know the science, but considering in a Finn, OK, Solo, D-One, Optimist, Topper, Laser and Phantom you sit behind the front edge of the board I am not sure that is correct.†


I've sailed 4 of those and it's easily possible to get your weight just ahead of the CofR The Finn and Oppi I've no idea, but I know this you wouldn't get far on a board if you tried to get upwind standing that far back, so there is obviously a lot of rudder compensation going on for an un natural sailing position in the OK, I must get a go in one, the aero if I recall suffers a little bit from the bulkhead being too close to where you need to be not helping you dial into a feelgood groove, unlike the D-Zero where you can slide exactly into place with ease.

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Posted By: Fatboi
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 1:27pm
Must have something to do with how far forward the rig is and where the CofE loads, but as I say, I don't know the science. 
Could do with a lesson from Dan H or someone else that knows the science.




Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 2:43pm
Originally posted by Fatboi

Must have something to do with how far forward the rig is and where the CofE loads, but as I say, I don't know the science.†
Could do with a lesson from Dan H or someone else that knows the science.


Don''t need Dan H who was a child wondering what to do with dangly parts of his anatomy when we learned sailing 101 that the Cof E (Centre of Effort) needs to be slightly ahead of the C of R, (Centre of Lateral resistance) then we didn't have rudders so i guess we take it for granted, if it's not the craft won't go, but what we're all doing is racing them so we use our body weight to fine tune that balance which is why you'll note the top half of the body on better sailors is ahead of the bottom half if I'm not telling you how to suck eggs here, I always assume everyone knows better than I, how to make these things go. Took me a while to spot that good technique is the same as racing boards, but it still doesn't explain how you make OK's go fast upwind if you can't actually get the top half of your body ahead of the Cof R unless of course that Cof R is actually behind the Centreboard on an OK which I doubt.
There's no question they go, I just wonder how and why.

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Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 16 Nov 18 at 4:00pm
Looks nice but involves.wood.
It will have to live in the dinghy park year round. I don't have anywhere to store it, or do any wood type maintenance. I've moved since I last had a wood boat (N12) and had both time and resources for it.

I do like a nicely finished wood boat. But like an elephant, nice to look at, but don't want to own one. Not a good investment either as after a few seasons of my ownership it would only be fit for November 5th. 

Though there is an old (as in slightly younger than me) composite Finn on apolloduck...Been cared for enough for 50 years to still look good and be useable. I'd feel quite bad if it ended up on a bonfire because of me after all that time. Wouldn't extend that to a Laser though.



Posted By: Fatboi
Date Posted: 19 Nov 18 at 10:17am
[/QUOTE]
Don''t need Dan H who was a child wondering what to do with dangly parts of his anatomy when we learned sailing 101 that the Cof E (Centre of Effort) needs to be slightly ahead of the C of R, (Centre of Lateral resistance) then we didn't have rudders so i guess we take it for granted, if it's not the craft won't go, but what we're all doing is racing them so we use our body weight to fine tune that balance which is why you'll note the top half of the body on better sailors is ahead of the bottom half if I'm not telling you how to suck eggs here, I always assume everyone knows better than I, how to make these things go. Took me a while to spot that good technique is the same as racing boards, but it still doesn't explain how you make OK's go fast upwind if you can't actually get the top half of your body ahead of the Cof R unless of course that Cof R is actually behind the Centreboard on an OK which I doubt.
There's no question they go, I just wonder how and why.[/QUOTE]


Does the rudder not significantly alter this though? It will not just be resisting from the centerboard.

I must admit I have never seen 'the top half of the body on better sailors is ahead of the bottom half'
In my whole life I have never been told this...I am not sure that this is correct. Especially if you add any waves sailing upwind, then the body will be generally angled back and the upper half will be moving to keep the moving through the water. 

In flat water, sure, get your weight forward, but that is usually because you are getting the stern out of the water, especially if the aft is a big, flat area designed for planing downwind. 



Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 19 Nov 18 at 10:36am
On a board the trim affects the CoR much more than in a boat and on the boat the CoE is more or less fixed (upwind anyway) cos the mast doesn't move. Steering is more affected by heel than fore and aft trim (it's a combination of moving the CoE to the side and the effect of the asymmetric hull form).

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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 10:12am
Originally posted by turnturtle

My advice is to try and find an older Finn.... they are truly wonderful boats if youíre carrying a bit of weight.   Youíve got your windsurf kit for planing winds, so might as well find a boat which excels in displacement mode.... and Finns do that beautifully.  

The H2 looks like an option, but Iíd demo first.... Iíve heard theyíre a bit marmite.
Theres a Finn for sale on apolloduck / ebay (though quite s differential in price between the two). Budget has changed since a tax bill is imminent.

It would think, but I'm stuck abroad until Xmas, and apart from it being a 12 hour / 700 mile round trip theres no towbar on the car, or road trailer with the boat. Could maybe borrow a trailer though.
Anything worth looking at seems to be appearing at the furthest point away possible.

Sorry GRF, the Finn does sound tempting.


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 3:57pm
Just re-scanned this thread having partaken in the other one. You seem to have decided the 300 is not for you, good decision IMHO :-

A quote from your first post "So I'm leaning towards an RS300  I'm probably too heavy for it to be competitive, but can't travelling to events anyway. looks to be a simple enough rig, and I suspect it will be quick and fun where I sail. Hull looks same general shape as MX-Ray. " 

I would say the 300 is much (much) narrower on the WL than an MX Ray, that's why there are so many pics of sailors inspecting the centreboard Tongue


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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Neptune
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 4:04pm
Most sailors at club level are too static and lazy to sail a 300, which is why thereís pictures of them upside down.  They are pretty forgiving if your prepared to put some effort in,  it if you want to jump in and look like a sailing legend straight off then they are not the boat for you.

That said if prepared to put some effort in they are very quick and civilized


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RS300, ex Musto Skiff


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 4:08pm
The OP is 50 and 100+kg and returning to dinghies after a lay off......

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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Neptune
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 4:28pm
Thatís not where you were going with your comments, age isnít important if youíre fit and prepared, plenty of lazy 20 yr olds. Some fast sailors north of 100 kg too, but I was trying to point out itís a boat you have to work at to get up that curve

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RS300, ex Musto Skiff


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 4:52pm
I think it's fair to say the 300 is not an easy boat to sail though, which is where I was going with my comments.

TBF I haven't sailed one (would love to BTW) so I don't know how much more difficult than a Blaze/Finn/Phantom they are but, as an ex MPS sailor you had some experience of tricky boats before coming to the 300 so if you had a learning curve...........


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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Late starter
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 5:43pm
As an overweight 50 something myself I can't say I've tried to sail boats like an RS300 or 600, let alone an MPS. But I've seen plenty of my pals do that and spend a lot of time upside down before selling said boat and returning to their Solos or whatever. And some of these guys were not bad club racers in their 40s and 50s, so not sure what that means other than I think these could be boats for younger guys. But if someone of the older/unfit persuasion can have the persistence to crack something like an MPS, good for them but I think they will be in a minority. 


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 5:54pm
A youngish (30s) very fit and adventurous (he does flying suit sky diving so he's completely bonkers) mate bought a MPS, had some professional training and, eventually, sold it having never got to grips with it. He replaced it with a L3k which he single hands off the wire, three sails up and is having a ball with it.

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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 6:49pm
A lay off in the sense that I switched to board sailing.
They don't have much of waterline beam either Wink


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 26 Nov 18 at 7:44pm
Originally posted by Dangerousday


Sorry GRF, the Finn does sound tempting.


They do look inviting, then you see the flat chunk of metal in the middle, and you try to pick one up without a crane..

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Posted By: rich96
Date Posted: 27 Nov 18 at 1:54pm
Then you sail one and realise what an amazing boat it is


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 27 Nov 18 at 3:18pm
Originally posted by rich96

Then you sail one and realise what an amazing boat it is


I'm intrigued. Define amazing for me ?

Amazingly heavy?
Amazingly slow?
Amazingly ponderous?
Amazingly expensive?

I mean seriously what is it about a 1949 model almost keelboat that would give me a hernia without a second look, that makes it amazing?

No, don't tell me.. there it is in the specs, length 4.5, sail 10.6, PY 1060.. it's a Bandit of course.. that's the attraction.

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Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 27 Nov 18 at 7:48pm
What are Finns like to sail ?


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 27 Nov 18 at 9:06pm
Originally posted by Dangerousday

A lay off in the sense that I switched to board sailing.
They don't have much of waterline beam either Wink

So did I, for nearly 30 years, didn't help one jot without a boom to hang onto. My return boat was the Spice, a twin trapeze nearly skiff, pretty stable (certainly compared to a 300) and not at all radical but I still fall over a lot. TBF I am a good few years older than you DD (not quite old enough to be your father but...) so maybe I have something of an excuse.

I think you need to go and sail some now, the Finn and 300 probably couldn't be more different so it shouldn't take more than around 90 seconds in each to decide which one is not for you.


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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 27 Nov 18 at 10:21pm
Spice, wasn't that another one of the late 90s boats, as per the thread I started in development section?

107kg for a Finn - just looked it up. Seems quite a lot, nearly 2 Lasers worth. How much lead is in the thing? Hope that includes the plate too?
Don't know if my 'composite'Phantom was much different.
Came across the K1 earlier whilst clicking through the forum. 125kg and that includes 62kg keel.
That metal plate probably weighs more than my board!


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 28 Nov 18 at 9:45am
Spice was launched in '96, a Buzz with an ISO rig and extra wire (more or less). I have loved mine but they were not successful.

Finn is a heavy old boat but with a carbon rig probably still comes in at under 130kg (hull inc CB min 116kg) and, yes the CB does weigh more than your board at 11-13kg. A half decent Phantom should weigh half that or less ready to sail.

That K1 weighs the same as a GP (and much less than a Wayfarer!).


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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Wiclif
Date Posted: 28 Nov 18 at 5:46pm
K1 is nice, carries weight well, and is very forgiving, yet the generous sail area makes it enjoyable to sail in lighter conditions.

Spoken by a biased K1 owner of 100 kg,


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 03 Dec 18 at 4:25pm
I've just agreed to buy another Phantom. Wood as the taxman says "NO" to a plastic one, but looks to be much, much nicer than the last one. Not intending to go travelling with, just Club use so wood/plastic is more a maintenance thing than anything.
Just remembered that a sailor at the club I had last one at thought it had a Fireball mast. 


Posted By: Dangerousday
Date Posted: 23 Dec 18 at 1:31am
I forgot about the aches. Perhaps its the senility thats set in over last 10 years. More probably the wear and tear since then on the body, however:
I have had a good few hours today in Phantom 609 - a Claridge build wood self drainer. It is much nicer than the last one. I need more time in it to get best out of it (on the fly rig rake is new to me). It needs a new mainsheet ratchet block, one that actually does something more than make 'click, click' noises.


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 23 Dec 18 at 9:42am
Good to hear you're pleased with the new boat. Thumbs Up If it's any consolation the aches are non boat specific.........

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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"



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