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Insurance for coaches

Printed From: Yachts and Yachting Online
Category: Dinghy classes
Forum Name: Dinghy development
Forum Discription: The latest moves in the dinghy market
URL: http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=11213
Printed Date: 11 Aug 22 at 11:28am
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Topic: Insurance for coaches
Posted By: 2547
Subject: Insurance for coaches
Date Posted: 18 Nov 13 at 4:25pm
Anyone got any experience in sorting out insurance for people who coach?

How does it work if you have people helping out or leading a training session?

Lets assume they are not professional coaches and perhaps do this 2 or 3 times a year.

Not all of them have RYA qualifications but are very capable and competent coaches.

Does the club insurance cover this? 

Do they need a RYA qualification of some type that then means they are covered through the RYA?

I know lots of people who offer coaching (unpaid) and wonder if they are exposed in the case of an accident.



Replies:
Posted By: alstorer
Date Posted: 18 Nov 13 at 4:42pm
I know it's sad, but I think you may struggle to get insurance to cover without formal qualifications.

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Al


Posted By: 2547
Date Posted: 18 Nov 13 at 9:33pm
What about those who do have a RYA ticket such as "Club Racing Coach"?


Posted By: Bootscooter
Date Posted: 18 Nov 13 at 9:46pm
Doesn't RYA membership give you the required coverage if you're qualified?

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Posted By: winging it
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 9:46am
If you're coaching or instructing within an RTC their insurance will cover you if you are appropriately qualified.  I am not sure about 'experienced but not qualified' you should be fine if under the official supervision of an SI or adult qualified RCL2 or higher.  (I have to read and check our policy every year, and sign to say I have done so and am happy with out cover.)  This cover is one of the benefits of being RYA recognised.

If you are coaching independently you will not get affordable cover unless you are qualified.  Companies like Gallagher Heath etc offer good cover for freelancers, around 350 per year.


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the same, but different...



Posted By: Stevie_GTI
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 9:49am
To my knowledge all coaches who are working privately need their own insurance, which I believe you need to have a coaching qualification to obtain.
If you are working for a club/organisation I think you are covered by their insurance providing you have the correct coaching qualification.
For the sake of 80 a year I think all coaches should have some personal liability insurance cover anyway.


Posted By: 2547
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 10:13am
RTC = ?

RCL2 = ?

So ... if a class expert (non-RYA ticketed) wants to run a training day they are doing so at quite some risk???




Posted By: 2547
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 10:15am
Originally posted by Bootscooter

Doesn't RYA membership give you the required coverage if you're qualified?

I don't think so ... be careful ...


Posted By: Stevie_GTI
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 10:27am
Being a member of the rya does not cover you, as far as I'm aware.

I would recommend that you check your clubs insurance policy, it may be that coaches are covered. But then what counts as being a coach.....if you don't have the qualification then in my eyes you're not a coach. Don't forget you need a valid first aid certificate and atleast pb2 to get a coaching qualification, which is probably why you need the qualification to get insured.


Posted By: kevg
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 12:44pm
Originally posted by 2547

RTC = ?

RCL2 = ?
So ... if a class expert (non-RYA ticketed) wants to run a training day they are doing so at quite some risk???


Recognised training centre. & race coach level 2.


Posted By: winging it
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 3:20pm
If the class expert is being supervised by a qualified coach and the event is being held within the remit of a recognised training centre then they should be reasonably safe.  The coach or SI in charge should have carried out a basic risk assessment for the day which will include current and forecast conditons, number of boats, sailing area, level of competence of sailors, safety cover etc.  If the paperwork is in place then the chances of being successfully sued are iminmal if operating within a recognised rya training centre.

Outside such an environment yes, quite some risk.


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the same, but different...



Posted By: 2547
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 3:58pm
Originally posted by winging it

If the class expert is being supervised by a qualified coach and the event is being held within the remit of a recognised training centre then they should be reasonably safe.  The coach or SI in charge should have carried out a basic risk assessment for the day which will include current and forecast conditons, number of boats, sailing area, level of competence of sailors, safety cover etc.  If the paperwork is in place then the chances of being successfully sued are iminmal if operating within a recognised rya training centre.

Outside such an environment yes, quite some risk.

My investigation so far indicates that is only true if all parties (coach & pupils) are members of the club/RTC


Posted By: winging it
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 6:09pm
Yes, I had assumed they were. A visiting coach should have their own insurance.

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the same, but different...



Posted By: 2547
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 6:53pm
Originally posted by winging it

Yes, I had assumed they were. A visiting coach should have their own insurance.

Visiting pupils would also not be covered. Only club members. 


Posted By: RichTea
Date Posted: 19 Nov 13 at 8:36pm
Originally posted by 2547

Originally posted by winging it

Yes, I had assumed they were. A visiting coach should have their own insurance.

Visiting pupils would also not be covered. Only club members. 

Won't visitors be temporary members, ie they are paying for some training? 

I was with Heath Lambert, now Gallagher Heath
http://www.rya.org.uk/newsevents/enewsletters/theclubroom/sept2011/Pages/GallagherHeath.aspx

It was about 50 a year, never claimed but was required for the Powerboat instructing I was doing.


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RS200


Posted By: Sailing Coach
Date Posted: 20 Nov 13 at 4:00pm

Hi,

If you look on the RYA website in coaching resources they have just updated there information. http://www.rya.org.uk/coursestraining/coachestrainersinstructors/racecoaches/Pages/Resources.aspx" rel="nofollow - http://www.rya.org.uk/coursestraining/coachestrainersinstructors/racecoaches/Pages/Resources.aspx

To paraphrase it:

         You need to be qualified with a valid RYA coaching award and a current first aid award.

         When coaching at a RYA Training Centre they should have insurance.

         When coaching at a sailing club or for a class association they should cover your insurance (but check with them).

         If you are working on own boat tuition you will need insurance.

         Also check your power boat is insured.

Hope this helps,

Sailing Coach



Posted By: 2547
Date Posted: 20 Nov 13 at 5:03pm
Originally posted by Sailing Coach

 When coaching at a sailing club or for a class association they should cover your insurance (but check with them).

         

This is the option that is hard to get to the bottom of ...


T




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