sail-world.com -- British lifesavers - 39 times a day, at your service

British lifesavers - 39 times a day, at your service    

'RNLI in action'    .

The numbers are impressive, but they only tell one aspect of the story. This summer, Britain's Royal National Lifesaving Institution (RNLI) lifeboats launched 3575 times - nearly 39 times a day - to rescue those in trouble on the water.

The roughest weather of the summer was faced by the Aldeburgh lifeboat off the coast of Suffolk on June 8. The crew launched in a Force 9-10 conditions to assist a 13-metre Dutch yacht with four crewmen on board. The yacht had struck the Aldeburgh Ridge and lost her rudder. Working alongside an RAF rescue helicopter, the lifeboat managed to tow the yacht to safety despite terrible weather conditions.

The furthest distance travelled by a lifeboat in a single shout was carried out by St Mary’s lifeboat, on the Isles of Scilly, which launched to rescue a catamaran 80 nautical miles offshore and tow it back to harbour.

In the North, the Humber crew were called out on an 11.2 hour shout on June 22 to a yacht that had suffered engine failure in near gale force conditions. The yacht’s crew were suffering from sea sickness and had to be taken aboard the lifeboat before being winched up by a rescue helicopter.

The lifeboat crew at Anstruther in Scotland faced one of the most unusual challenges of the summer, when they were involved in an operation to assist around 20 pilot whales stranded on Anstruther beach. Ten whales were saved.

Michael Vlasto added: 'Once again our volunteer lifeboat crew and lifeguards have shown that they are committed and courageous individuals, on stand by to save lives at sea come rain or shine.'

RNLI Divisional Inspector, North, Andy Clift, added: ‘As well as the life-saving work carried out by RNLI lifeboat crews this summer, we should also remember the sterling efforts of our fundraising volunteers. The RNLI depends on people like them to fund our lifeboat service – without their hard work, our lifeboat crews would be unable to continue saving lives at sea.’



by Joanna Quinn/Sail-World Cruising
- 6:55 AM Fri 21 Sep 2012 GMT





Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.
If you want to send this story to a friend, please use link below
http://www.sail-world.com/indexs.cfm?nid=102215

Based on your current download speed Sail-World has delivered large images (660 pixels long side.)  If you would like to see only small images (300 pixels long side) click here .  For medium sized images (500 pixels long side) click here .  If you would prefer to see text only (without pictures) click here

Click for further information on
Safety and the cruising sailor

Related News Stories:
10 Jun 2013  WARNING against electronic flares
26 Nov 2012  Vandals strike Marine Rescue vessel at start of peak sailing season
18 Jun 2012  Sabbath laws and 'who will pay' hampers search for missing sailors
07 Sep 2010  Non-Stop Weekend Workout for Marine Rescue Volunteers

Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XL NEW AUS