sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Cruising Photo Gallery Video Gallery

 

Sail-World.com : Melbourne to Port Fairy Race 2012 - Rescue at Sea Part 1

Melbourne to Port Fairy Race 2012 - Rescue at Sea Part 1

'TryBooking.com during the 2012 Melbounre to Port Fairy race - 2012 ORCV Melbourne to Port Fairy Race'    Grant Dunoon
The rescue at sea of the crew of Inception by TryBooking.com, another competitor in the Melbourne to Port Fairy Race 2012, is a gripping story with a great outcome.

What follows is part 1 of the account of the events by Grant Dunoon, skipper of TryBooking.com, as told to Dr Peter Ball.

Trouble ahead
At 2:00pm on Good Friday, 6th April 2012, the yachts in the annual Melbourne to Port Fairy ocean race (the M2PF Race) had been underway for 14 hours. The fleet consisted of 14 yachts, including Inception, a 10 year old 50’ Beneteau with its crew of six and TryBooking.com, a 43’ Elan Impression 434 crewed by Grant Dunoon (skipper), Peter Fetch, Ross Fisher and Kim Walker.

Grant (48), the owner and skipper of TryBooking.com, was taking part in his second ocean race, having participated in the Melbourne to Stanley event in November 2011. He had developed good situational awareness through many years as an airline pilot and this would be crucial later in the night.

Ross (66) was the most experienced member of the crew. With decades of experience behind him, Ross could be relied on to remain cool and calm at all times. His unflinching resolve would be essential as events unfolded.

Kim’s (49) previous ocean race had been the Melbourne to Stanley on board TryBooking.com. The rough conditions of that race had given him an extreme case of sea sickness, but he was determined not to let that get the better of him. When darkness robbed him of the horizon, the constant movement aggravated his sea sickness once again. However, when the time came, he would ignore his own condition and give everything he had to the work at hand.

Peter (53) had also previously sailed in the race to Stanley on board TryBooking.com. He had an implacable resolve to 'get the job done, no matter what'. His quiet 'can do' attitude and his strength and agility meant he would play a key role in the way the crew responded to the events that were to come.

Meanwhile, in the early afternoon of Good Friday, the crew of TryBooking.com had no inkling of what was ahead of them. The conditions had been fine and sunny with a light northeasterly becoming a 15kt northwesterly for the first stage of the race from Queenscliff. However, as the fleet approached Cape Otway, conditions began to deteriorate. The forecast indicated a front would move in from the west at about 1900hrs on Friday causing the wind to swing around to the west and intensify to 35kts by 2200hrs. It promised to be a rough night, but crews were looking forward to the chance to compete in the challenging conditions. They were also hoping for some abatement early on Saturday morning when winds were expected to back around to the southwest and moderate to 20-25kts with the seas dropping from 5m to 3m.

On board TryBooking.com, Ross checked the wind at 23kts and the crew decided to prepare for the coming weather by taking down the number 1 sail and setting the number 4, their heavy weather sail. Once round Cape Otway, the fleet would cross the boundary between Bass Strait and the Southern Ocean. This area is known for its treachery in storm conditions when large swells from the deep Southern Ocean meet the shallower water in Bass Strait. The crew wanted to be ready when the coming darkness coincided with the storm front in the region of turbulence.

As expected, TryBooking.com encountered the weather front just after rounding Cape Otway in the late afternoon. Wind speeds reached 35kts and the seas rose and became choppy. However, after about an hour of this, the wind dropped back to 10-15kts. Grant and his crew discussed the possibility of changing back to the number 1 sail. It was a better racing option in the lighter conditions, but the brevity of the front was a concern. They were expecting storm conditions for at least five hours. Had it really passed or was there more on the way?

The answer appeared in the fading light and made up their minds immediately. They put aside any further thoughts of changing the storm sail as the main weather front loomed in the west. The conditions they had experienced for the past hour were just the prelude. The main event was about to commence.

At 1800hrs, the second front hit them with full force as the wind blasted in from the northwest at 40 to 50kts with gusts up to 70kts. Grant’s first thought was to reduce the number 4 sail, but the tension was so high due to the wind that it could not be furled. For the next five hours, they battled the conditions. Determined to stay in the race, they believed that if they could get through the night, they would be able to make the most of the somewhat lighter southwest winds that were expected early on Saturday morning.

They were sailing as close to the wind as possible to minimise the load on the sail. Nevertheless, the boat was leaning at 45 dregrees and drifting significantly. Whilst holding a heading of 315 degrees, their track was 360 degrees.

The crew discussed the possibility of turning downwind to relieve pressure on the sail so it could be furled, but they decided to maintain their course because they were managing the conditions and they did not want to lose several miles when there was a chance the tactic might not work anyway.

The whole time, Grant was very aware that they were sailing off the Shipwreck Coast. His wife, Delma, had reminded him that 'It’s called the Shipwreck Coast for a reason!'. In fact, there have been over 700 wrecks on this coastline since white settlement. Grant was allowing an extra safety margin to act as a buffer in case of GPS error.

However, pitching and tossing in the rough conditions was making it difficult for Grant to helm. He briefly tried tying himself to a cleat, but even this would not arrest the slipping and sliding. The unsteadiness, coupled with the constant spray, wind and frequent washes of green water coming over the side made it impossible to see any detail on the chart plotter. Not wishing to unwittingly cross his safety boundary, Grant switched position. Moving to the centre of the boat made it easier to stand steadily. He found he could see the compass with its large white characters on a black background, but the smaller black characters on the white background of the chart plotter were still unreadable. Eventually, he called Peter to read out the numbers from the screen.

The boat was knocked down a number of times that night, Kim who was once seated was now on his back and sliding towards the lifelines. Grant was not sure if the wind speed sensor was destroyed when the mast tip clipped a wave or in one of the many gusts.

All the while, Grant listened intently to the sail. He could not allow it to flap or it would be shredded by the wind, but he could not allow it to carry any excess wind or they would be blown off course due to drift.

They tacked and headed away from the coast for an hour on a heading of 240 degrees. Whilst gripping the helm with both hands, Grant asked Peter to rinse his glasses with a bottle of fresh water. Finally he could see the green line on the chart plotter screen and was able to quantify their drift. They were holding a heading of 240 degrees but their actual track was in the range 180 – 210 degrees. It was obvious that the best they could achieve in these severe storm conditions was to hold their ground!

Grant’s aim was to hold on and stay in the race, losing as little ground as possible whilst waiting for the main part of the storm to pass and for the wind to back from the northwest around to the southwest.

At one point, Grant noticed a 60cm deep pool of water welling up at his feet. Greenwater was washing over the rails and the 45 degree lean of the boat was not allowing it to drain. Grant was concerned that it would infiltrate the engine’s starting panel and short it out. Losing access to their engine if needed in these conditions would have been problematic to say the least. Grant steered into wind to reduce the lean of the boat and allow the water to drain, but he could not hold this heading for more than a moment as it put the sail at risk of tearing as it flogged in the gale.

They were now about seven nautical miles off the coast. Grant’s coast proximity boundary was a line that paralleled the coast at a distance of five nautical miles. He held a heading of 280 degrees, giving a track of 300 – 320 degrees, which was almost parallel to the coast. If the wind started to back to the west, or at least if it did not swing any further to the north, they might be able to maintain their track without having to put in another tack.


Suddenly Grant noticed that the chart plotter display dimmed for a moment. 'Oh no', he thought, 'we can’t lose this screen now!'. Without the chart plotter, TryBooking.com would have to steer out to sea to ensure they kept clear of the coast. The display held for about 10 minutes then briefly dimmed again. Frantically, Grant ticked off a list of possible reasons in his mind. His first thought was that battery power was running low. He turned the engine ignition key to commence recharging and was relieved to see the tachometer needle jump as the diesel fired, but his heart sank as the screen dimmed again. What could be causing the problem? In his fatigued state, in the dreadful conditions, was he imagining it? He recalled that the chart plotter on the sister ship of TryBooking.com had failed and had had to be replaced. Could TryBooking.com now be having the same problem?

His next thought was the bilge pump. If it was periodically switching in, the intermittent spikes might be causing the screen to dim. It was good to know the pump was working but, at the same time, terrifying to think that there might be water below. Peter immediately went below to check under the cabin floor. Fortunately, he soon reported that he could find no water.

They put together a contingency plan in case the plotter failed. They would tack out to sea for 90 minutes then take up a heading of no more than 280 degrees for up to three hours. This would keep them on a track that was parallel to the coast, but well away from the dangerous shore. They would tack again out to sea for 60 – 90 minutes and reassess their position as dawn broke. At that time, they would be able to safely revert to visual navigation. Doing this would cause them to lose time, but it was the safe option in the terrible conditions.

At about 2330hrs, they were six and a half nautical miles off the coast and gradually encroaching on the five nautical mile safety boundary when they sighted Inception about 300 meters ahead of them. They saw the green light on the mast and the white stern light as TryBooking.com passed 50 meters behind. At this stage, unknown to the crew of TryBooking.com, Inception was taking on water and probably not moving very quickly. However, it appeared to the crew of TryBooking.com that Inception was tacking out to sea. This made Grant question his judgement about holding his heading. He believed he was maintaining a safe distance off shore, but seeing Inception apparently heading away from the coast caused him to re-evaluate the situation.

The sighting of Inception was one factor, but he was also thinking of an impending radio call (a 'sched') that was set for 0005hrs. Grant was going to hand the helm to Kim while he went below for the sched, but Kim was suffering from severe sea sickness. In the circumstances, Grant decided it was prudent for Kim to be steering away from the coast. Despite his condition, Kim took the helm confidently and held the new course expertly. At 2350hrs, Grant went below to prepare for the sched. The radios were switched on in case special warnings were broadcast, although the incessant noise meant there was no chance of hearing anything from the cockpit. However, as Grant made his way below he realised the ORCV was calling TryBooking.com ahead of schedule. On hearing the call, he immediately went over the race rules in his mind. 'Did I infringe?'. He recalled the recommended minimum clearance of 3nm off Cape Otway and wondered if there was a similar figure for the Shipwreck Coast. As he keyed the microphone to acknowledge the call, he was expecting to be disciplined. Instead, he was horrified to hear that Inception was taking on water and her life raft had been blown off the deck two hours before. The ORCV then asked if TryBooking.com 'was available to assist.'

The search
It was now approaching 2400hrs. Grant immediately agreed to help and requested a bearing and distance to Inception’s position. Peter Clancy was handling communications for the ORCV over the HF radio and was monitoring the boats’ progress throughout the race. He replied that the last position they had was 30 minutes old, but a fresh update was expected momentarily at 2400hrs: 'Just wait', he said.

Grant darted up the steps to the cockpit and alerted the crew that Inception was in trouble and it looked like they would be asked to locate her and shadow her to port.

As he returned to the radio, Peter (ORCV) advised that they had received a position update from TryBooking.com, but not from Inception. He added that Inception was speaking by mobile phone to the Port Fairy Yacht Club (PFYC). Grant decided to go with the information he had. He went up to the cockpit, started the engine and steered in the general direction of Inception’s last known position. As they turned downwind, they tried unsuccessfully to furl the headsail. It flapped uncontrollably for some minutes and caused two ropes to become tangled and knotted. Grant feared the furler would break under the strain and dreaded the thought of someone having to go forward and cut it free. However, Peter (crew) managed to winch it in manually.

As they approached the position where they believed Inception had been just over 30 minutes before, the crew of TryBooking.com was vigilant and mindful of avoiding a collision. However, nothing could be seen. The sea was black and empty. Grant went below to check in by radio with ORCV who reported that Inception had lost all electrical power. Grant assumed they must still be communicating via mobile phone to the PFYC.

Going topside again, Grant suddenly caught sight of a flare arcing across the sky behind TryBooking.com. He called to Kim to get a bearing, but he was unable to get a fix on the compass. However, Kim did have a sense of the quadrant where it had been, despite the lack of directional reference points. They immediately turned and steered towards the area from where they believed the flare had been fired. Moments later they saw distant lights. These turned out to be the town lights of Port Campbell, but with the crashing waves and sheets of flying spray, it appeared to be a row of people in life jackets along the rail of a boat!

The initial excitement of seeing the lights gave way to doubt once the TryBooking.com crew realised they were not gaining on the lights, so after about 10 minutes, they concluded the lights were on-shore, and they turned and tracked back.

Grant went below once again to the radio. He reported seeing the flare and offered to fire a flare from TryBooking.com. He still believed Inception was afloat and had contact with PFYC via mobile phone, and so messages might be able to be relayed between the boats through ORCV and PFYC. He also asked for Inception to turn on any torches they might have.

At this point, Peter (ORCV) asked Grant to wait as more information was coming in. Signals from Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) had been received! After what seemed like a long wait, Peter read out the latitude and longitude that marked the position of the EPIRB. Grant carefully wrote the numbers down then read them back to confirm. Satisfied that he had the correct figures, he raced upstairs to the chart plotter and keyed them in, double checking to ensure no errors. They immediately set course for the latest position fix. About 15 minutes later as they reached the position, it became apparent that they were too late on the scene. The area was in total darkness. There was nothing. As a hollow empty feeling came over them, TryBooking.com turned downwind in the belief that the EPIRBS must have drifted in the wind and waves. As they came around, they saw the lights of Port Campbell again. Once again they ruled them out after about 10 minutes, and they turned and made their way back to the original EPIRB fix.

Grant radioed Peter at the ORCV again and received a new EPIRB position fix. Again he raced upstairs and keyed the latitude and longitude into the plotter. This time he marked the position with a circle to differentiate it from the 'x' that notated the first point. With two points on the chart plotter now, Grant projected a line from the first to the second and beyond. Being mindful of the time between fixes, he then estimated the EPIRBs’ current location. They were drifting very quickly. Without delay, TryBooking.com turned and tracked to a point just past the calculated position.

The idea was to go slightly beyond where the Inception crew ought to be, then turn and track back along their projected line of drift. If TryBooking.com could not locate them this time, the plan was to commence a systematic grid search.

Just as TryBooking.com approached the point where they were turning onto the projected line of drift, Peter shouted, 'Whistles! Whistles!' He was standing at the head of the cockpit and steadying himself by gripping the frame of the dodger cover. Back at the helm, Grant yelled back in reply that the sound was a gas detector alarm rather than whistles. (For over three hours, the gas-leak warning alarm had been sounding below. The crew had thoroughly checked the gas line and were satisfied it was just a malfunction of the alarm, probably due to water infiltration. The high-pitched beeping sound was faintly audible at times in the cockpit above). However, Peter turned back excitedly to insist that he could hear whistles.

A moment later as Grant peered ahead into the darkness, he saw a single light. Simultaneously, the other crew members shouted 'Light! Light!' but as they dropped into a trough, it disappeared. It was just a glimpse but it was enough. Another large wave passed in darkness then, as they crested a second, they suddenly saw a row of lights strung out on the rising wall of the next approaching wave. It was like standing in an arena and looking up into the grandstand. Plotting the line of drift had worked. The crew of Inception had been found!

The rescue
The elation of finding the missing men in the tempestuous seas and darkness quickly gave way to the realisation that, somehow, they had to be brought safely on board. Up until this point, Grant had been able to draw on his extensive experience and training in aviation navigation. However, a sea rescue in these terrible conditions was something for which none of them could have prepared in any meaningful way. Grant began to cross off various options that flashed through his mind. A wave suddenly jolted the boat, knocking it sideways and reinforcing the need to approach the rescue with great caution to avoid injuring the men in the ocean whilst trying to save them.

Bringing the sailors up and over the side of TryBooking.com was not going to be possible. Simply put, the exhausted crew of TryBooking.com would have been too exposed on the slippery deck. They had not trained in using the halyard in this way and may not have had enough energy for the physical task of winching the sailors aboard.

Bringing the crew of Inception in over the landing at the stern looked like the best option, but great care would be required. In the darkness and confused seas, there was a real risk of injuring the sailors if they went under the stern. What was the best way to approach them?

Sailing forwards to the group then stopping would be problematic because holding the boat into wind would be very difficult. When the boat was stationary, the wind would push the bow off its line almost immediately. On the other hand, turning Trybooking.com around and reversing towards the group with the bow downwind would be very dangerous. The huge seas could swamp the stern and wash the sailors under in such a configuration.

They needed to point TryBooking.com into the wind and be able to control the bow whilst stationary. They steered about six meters to the left of the group in the water and went about six meters past them. Grant then turned 60 degrees to the right and the wind immediately pushed them sideways towards the sailors. The intention was to apply power to control the bow and oppose the wind so that the boat sideslipped. If it worked as intended, Grant would hold the direction of the boat and allow it to approach the sailors in a reasonably controlled way.

As he manoeuvred past the men in the water, they shouted 'Over here! Over here!', thinking TryBooking.com was moving away. Grant was in such a high state of concentration and focus on the task at hand that the omnipresent sound of the wind and water momentarily faded. The world was now in black and white. For a brief period, he heard only the engine and the cries of the men in the water. He called out to reassure them.

As TryBooking.com manoeuvred into position, a large wave suddenly lifted and pushed the boat sideways towards the sailors. Grant slammed the throttle to neutral, fearing the boat would land on top of them. As they went under the rail amidships on the starboard side, they disappeared from sight and Grant thought they were going under the boat. He felt helpless as he could do nothing but wait.

Suddenly, a head and shoulders bobbed up just behind the landing at the stern. In a split second, Grant let go of the helm, turned and seized the top of the man’s life jacket with both hands. Using all his strength, he hauled the man upwards, but due to the weight of the water-logged clothing and the tether to the others in the water, he could not lift him into the boat.

By this time, the wind was nudging TryBooking.com’s bow around and pushing them away from the sailors. Grant shouted for his companions to hold onto him from behind but after short struggle, the dragging force became too great and he had to let the sailor go.

Disheartened, Grant resumed his position at the helm and realised that he would have to stay there to maintain control if they were going to have any chance of bringing the sailors on board.

In the meantime, one of the crew shouted to lower the ladder. All three immediately began untying the various items of equipment fixed about the stern. Once they were removed and taken forward, the ladder was clear and could be lowered.
He applied power and circled to the right to come around for a second attempt. Mindful of how the boat and the sailors had met amidships on their first encounter, Grant approached with extra clearance this time. He passed about ten meters to the left of the group and continued about the same distance beyond them. Then he steered 50 degrees to the right and carefully adjusted the power to control the bow whilst allowing the boat to drift towards the sailors.




by Grant Dunoon as told to Dr Peter Ball

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=96925

5:43 AM Mon 7 May 2012 GMT






Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.


News - USA and the World

America's Cup: Team New Zealand responds to Venue rumours *Feature by Richard Gladwell/Sail-World.com/nz
Emirates Team New Zealand has responded to reports published in Bermuda and mainland USA, that Bermuda has been selected as venue for the 35th America's Cup. In a media release sent mid-afternoon, New Zealand time, Emirates Team NZ CEO Grant Dalton said in response to unconfirmed reports that Bermuda had won the right to host the 35th America’s Cup, that the team had not been told of a decision ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15, Leg 2. Team Alvimedica’s OBR Amory Ross reports on the Leg 2 start and progress. Well, now we know what it feels like to be shot from of a cannon! That was utter insanity. When the gun went I think there was almost no wind at all—two knots or something—but as we slowly crept out from under the shadow of Table Mountain it changed drastically. ... [more]  

Amidst a 10% growth report on having issued over 9000 certificates worldwide in 2014, the recent Annual General Meeting of the Offshore Racing Congress is pleased to announces numerous improvements approved for use in the ORC Rules and policies for 2015. ... [more]  

The start of Leg 2 offered all the wind conditions you could want. I will not lie: I was pretty nervous to begin leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race (Mom called it ‘Stage Fright’); I think the whole team was pretty nervous. Here we are, having confidently completed the first leg of the Volvo Ocean Race—after 27 days at sea! ... [more]  

The ISAF Sailing World Cup Final in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates is set to be 'an experience of a lifetime' according to American Women's 470 sailor Briana Provancha. Some of the world’s top Men’s and Women’s 470 teams will make up the individual fleets with some excellent racing on the cards. ... [more]  

After finishing third in the annual RC44 match race championships, Team Nika seem to have got a taste for the podium. It was a tough day on the water for the start of fleet racing at the RC44 Oman Cup, with many teams struggling for consistency. ... [more]  

St Barth Cata Cup 2014 - Game on! by Dominique Ladouceur
The boats are ready and the sailors have all had a chance to test their catamarans in a very rigorous St-John Bay. The conditions will be windy at the start of this seventh edition of the St-Barth Cata Cup. Sailors will be facing winds from the west at 18 knots with gusts at 22 knots on the first race day. ... [more]  

While more modifications are being mooted for the champion supermaxi yacht Wild Oats XI as part of her preparation for next month’s Rolex Sydney Hobart yacht race, a high-profile new member of the team was revealed on Sydney Harbour today. ... [more]  

Wild Oats XI and Audi are ready to give the 2014 Rolex Sydney Hobart a shot! Photos by Andrea Francolini. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race: Meek's tips pay dividend in Leg 2 squalls and calms *Feature by Bob Fisher, Cape Town, South Africa
The seven competing boats in the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-2015 roughly gathered at 6pm local time (1600 Zulu) in a south-easterly wind that peaked at 30-40 knots, which had the local habit of dying away to nothing in places along the shoreline in the lee of Table Mountain. The clever skippers has sought advice from Geoff Meek, a local with a mass of experience ... [more]  

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing (ADOR), the Emirate’s entry into the Volvo Ocean Race 2014–15, cast off on the next leg of the epic, round-the-world race on Wednesday evening hoping to complete a hat-trick of victories in the best place possible – the team’s home port of Abu Dhabi. ... [more]  

Over 600 scientists gathered in Barcelona for the second International Ocean Research Conference have this evening named the skippers in the Barcelona World Race, the first and only double-handed, round the world regatta with no stops, as scientific agents during their upcoming circumnavigation of the globe, departing from the Catalan capital on December 31st. ... [more]  

Team Alvimedica set out on the 6,125 nautical mile race to Abu Dhabi today, as they sailed out of Cape Town at the start of Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race. After a brief lap of Table Bay, with the Turkish/American boat close to the lead, it was straight into battle. ... [more]  

Skippers of the seven boats in the Volvo Ocean Race fleet, which set out for the 6,125 nautical mile (nm) Leg 2 from Cape From the very start on Wednesday (1800 local/1600 UTC), the sailors were given a taste of things to come with gusts of up to 35 knots kicking up a procession of white-capped waves. It was a question of 'don't break your boat' as most opted for conservative sail choices, whil ... [more]  

An invigorated, rested and relatively relaxed crew on Team SCA led the Volvo Ocean Race fleet from Cape Town late this afternoon at the start Leg Two of the Volvo Ocean Race to Abu Dhabi. The 6,125-mile leg will provide a large variety of conditions and will require good seamanship and good navigational choices. ... [more]  

A whole host of Olympic heroes and World Champions will fight it out in the Nacra 17 at the inaugural ISAF Sailing World Cup Final in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates from 26-30 November 2014. The 17-boat Nacra 17 fleet features an abundance of Olympians with no less than 18 appearances stemming from Atlanta 1996 within the 17-boat fleet of 34 sailors. ... [more]  

The ISAF Sailing World Cup Final Finn fleet is made up of some exceptional talent with Great Britain's Ed Wright and Pieter Jan Postma (NED) coming in to Abu Dhabi, UAE with good form. Wright has been a permanent fixture on World Championship and ISAF Sailing World Cup podiums in recent years. ... [more]  

The RC44 Oman Cup opened with the season’s final day of match racing. Defending champions Team Aqua held a slim one-point lead over Synergy Russian Sailing Team who were fighting for the trophy they last won in 2012. Vladimir Prosikhin’s Team Nika started the day in third, with Hugues Lepic just two-points adrift in fourth and keen to get the French flag onto the podium. ... [more]  

Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race is underway. Catch ther replay here, if you missed the 90 minutes of racing action in Cape Town. The sailing is spectacular! ... [more]  

Visiting Cape Town was more than just a stopover in the Volvo Ocean Race for Team Alvimedica, but was an opportunity to really get to know the people and the culture of the 'mother city.' Take a look at how the team get involved while in Cape Town from meeting Archbishop Desmond Tutu to visiting heart surgery patients at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital. ... [more]  

15th Ambassadors Cup - Brazil claims victory by May Ling Teo, Changi Sailing Club
Light winds didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the 20 ambassadors who competed in the 15th annual Changi Sailing Club’s Ambassadors’ Cup, nor did the gentle breezes take the edge off the competitive spirit of the skippers and the crew who competed for the prestigious prize. ... [more]  

Spanish solo skipper Alex Pella wrote himself into the history books of the Route du Rhum solo Transatlantic race and Spanish ocean racing when he crossed the finish line of the 3,542 miles La Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe race first in Classe40 at 06:47:08 hrs TU/07:47:08hrs CET/02:47:08 Local Guadeloupe. ... [more]  

Star Sailors League Finals 2014, Nassau (Bahamas) - Robert Stanjek will be attempting to bring a stunning 2014 season to a fittingly impressive conclusion in the big upcoming Finals in Nassau in two weeks’ time. The second half of the year has proved particularly rewarding for the German sailor. ... [more]  

Two English born Finn sailors, once coach and student, will draw swords at the ISAF Sailing World Cup in December on Port Phillip. Both are gunning for national team selection and a chance to represent their country at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, Ed Wright sailing for Great Britain and Oli Tweddell representing Australia, where he’s lived for the past decade. ... [more]  

Yachting Australia has announced the appointment of experienced and respected sports administrator Matt Carroll to the role of Chief Executive Officer. Matt commences with Yachting Australia on Monday 24 November 2014, replacing Phil Jones who is leaving the organisation after 17 years at the helm. He comes from a background of roles in Australian and Japanese Rugby and Rugby World Cup. ... [more]  

The Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT) has announced the addition of the Congressional Cup to the 2015 World Championship Tour schedule. The announcement follows this year’s 50th anniversary of the historic Congressional Cup event, organised by Long Beach Yacht Club, in Long Beach, California. ... [more]  

18ft Skiffs: Smeg's second Red-Line run down Sydney harbour in 40kts *Feature by Michael Chittenden, Sydney harbour
In a sport which generally lacks characters, the 18ft skiffs have an over-supply. David Witt is one of those, underlined by taking his boat and crew out last Sunday daring the rest of the Sydney fleet to race in a breeze of 30-40kts, on an otherwise ideal day on Sydney Harbour. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race sailors set out again for the open seas on Wednesday with no piracy activity on their radar, but the threat of cyclones ahead on Leg 2 from Cape Town to Abu Dhabi. Sailing conditions in Cape Town look challenging for the 1800 start (local time)/1600 UTC, with plenty of wind, but flat seas forecast. ... [more]  

On the opening day of the Airwaves Noumea PWA Dream Cup, which is the final event on the 2014 PWA World Tour, the competitors registered for the upcoming six days of contest, which will see fifty-seven men and twelve women battling it out over Noumea’s pristine waters. ... [more]  

There are 11 days to go until a highly competitive fleet competes in the inaugural RORC Transatlantic Race from Lanzarote to Grenada. The race across the Atlantic will be a very different experience for the crews from 12 different nations taking part. ... [more]  

The Volvo Ocean Race restarts from Cape Town on Wednesday local time. Here is the full replay of the Media Conference with all seven skippers on stage, talking of the prospect of a tropical cyclone, the nuances of this Leg - which won't see the boats hopping on a ship to avoid pirates, and the other challenges facing the crews and their teams. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race - Team Vestas Wind ready to race by Brian Carlin, Team Vestas Wind
It’s the day before departure for Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race and we are much better prepared than the Leg 1 start in Alicante. We all have our small list of jobs to complete today but all being well; we will be out of the team base mid afternoon to take some personal time. ... [more]  

Young sailors in Abu Dhabi made sure to practice their ‘Go Azzam!’ cheers this week as Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing (ADOR) – the emirate’s entrant in the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 - prepared for the next leg of the round-the-world yacht challenge – the race from South Africa to the UAE capital. ... [more]  

18fters: Getting through the 'Death Zone' in a 35kt breeze *Feature
Volvo Ocean Race: Sam Davies speaks openly about the first leg *Feature
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final: Exciting 49er and 49erFX action expected
America's Cup: Significant changes made to Protocol, but issues remain *Feature
2014 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race - the 70th
Stoke Beer 18ft Skiff Auckland Champs: Knight Frank lead after 5 races
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final - RS:X elite Abu Dhabi bound
120 boat start line for Tasar Worlds in Busselton
Melges 24 U.S. Nationals - Full Throttle team grabs their sixth title
RC44 Oman Cup - Grand final showdown on the horizon
Visit Doyle Sails New Zealand at METS 2014
Top Kiwi Finn sailor debuts in the 2014 Star Sailors League Finals
2014 Butler Cup - Shane Young wins match race regatta
Adventures of a Sailor Girl: News and interviews from Nov 16 show *Feature
2014 Melges 24 U.S. National Championship - Moon wind
Australian 18ft Skiffs: 40kt winds cancel race but Witt sails + Video
2014 Melges 24 US National Championship - Day 2 images by Joy Dunigan
Volvo Ocean Race: Abu Dhabi are the Kings of Cape Town
Volvo Ocean Race: In Port races do count *Feature
Volvo Ocean Race: Abu Dhabi rules in Cape Town In Port Race
Volvo Ocean Race - Tricky In-Port Race for Team Alvimedica   
Volvo Ocean Race - Team SCA third in Cape Town In-Port Race   
A Sailor's Dream Home in the beautiful Bay of Islands - Auction 22 Nov   
Volvo Ocean Race: Cape Town In Port Race video and Media Conference *Feature   
2014 Brazilian Championship - Day 2   
2014 U.S. Melges 24 National Championship - Long haul   
2014 - 15 Volvo Ocean Race - The thinking trio   
US Sailing Team to celebrate Clearwater Training Center   
Moth Worlds 2015: Sliced bread, sheep stations, awe and reverence *Feature   
Volvo Ocean race: Images from the Practice racing in Cape Town *Feature   
Volvo Ocean Race - Lindsay Dibowitz sails on board Team Alvimedica   
Volvo Ocean Race: Big breeze for Practice Racing in Cape Town *Feature   
Volvo Ocean Race - All-clear from piracy threat   
Volvo Ocean Race - Team SCA confirms Leg 2 crew   
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final - Laser and Laser Radial sailors all set   
Star Sailors League Finals - France to be represented   
67th Turkey Day Regatta - ABYC dishes up another special regatta   
Dual Olympian Krystal Weir announces retirement from Olympic Sailing   
Volvo Ocean Race: Sibling rivalry, Greenhalghs prepare to race   
Star Sailors League Finals - Kljakovic Gaspic and Sitic to race   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL NEW US
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT