sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Video Gallery Photo Gallery

 

Sail-World.com : Ten Tips to Stormproof Your Sailboat for Peace of Mind!

Ten Tips to Stormproof Your Sailboat for Peace of Mind!

'When severe weather threatens take sensible precautions'    .

Would your sailing boat be able to weather a gale, storm, or worse in her slip, on a mooring, or at anchor? Will you have peace-of-mind the next time Mother Nature decides to unleash her fury in your area? Follow this handy ten-step checklist to make sure you do!

Wherever you live, you can expect to be visited by severe weather once in a while. And if you've strolled through any marina after a major storm and seen the damage, this provides a real 'wake up' call to us sailors. What else could have been done?

Read over this check-off list. Add to it. But by all means, print off a copy and add it to your storm preparations. When the heavy stuff comes your way, you'll be glad you did!

1. Double Up All Docking Lines:

If on a dock, use extra line to double up springs and bow lines. If you need to make short lines longer, join them together with a double becket bend or two bowlines tied together. Bowlines are stronger, but require more line.

Position slip lines so that they are higher up on the pilings. This will help keep the boat in place when the storm surge arrives.

2. Add Lots of Chafing Gear:

Did you know that many boats are lost in storms because their lines saw through sharp chocks?

Synthetic docking line has elasticity that--when under shock loads--can spring back and forth. This action can saw through a dock or anchor line in no time!

Use fine grit sandpaper to smooth the edges of chocks. Next, lash rags, canvas, split hose, or PVC tubing onto any line where it passes over a rub-rail or toe-rail, through a chock, or over the sharp edges of a Genoa track.

3. Put Out Horizontal and Vertical Fenders:

Hang extra horizontal fenders onto pilings and the hull where contact can be expected. This gives more area protection than vertical fenders. On the side next to finger piers, hang extra vertical fenders. If moored stern first, hang vertical fenders across the stern.

4. Shut Off all Seacocks Except This One!

Start at the bow and work your way aft. Open up every locker and compartment to check for seacocks or ball valves. Shut off each seacock. Turn the handle perpendicular (at a 90 degree angle) to the hose. This includes the head intake, sink and shower drain, engine raw water intake, and head overboard discharge seacocks. Leave both cockpit drain seacocks open to drain rain water.

5. Strip Away Canvas and Sails:

Get rid of windage that can cause the boat to 'sail' inside her slip. Strip the boat of sail covers, dodgers, Bimini tops, enclosures, and all other canvas products. Take this sailing gear home with you or stow it in a storage unit.

Remove the mainsail and headsail. Storms can shred a roller furled headsail like a grater shreds a hunk of cheese. Don't make the mistake of leaving this super expensive sail up in a blow. Remove the sail from the extrusion, bag it, and send it below or remove it from the boat.

6. Batten and Tape Hatches:

Are you sure those square hatches on your boat are watertight? Even the best production boats can leak like a screen door on a submarine from wind-driven rain in a storm. Close and dog (latch) hatches and opening ports. Tape around the inside edges of hatches and ports with strips of duct or sealing tape.

7. Remove or Sink Dinghies:

Clear the deck of inflatable dinghies. If you have a hard (rigid) dinghy, take it home with you. If cruising in a remote area, pull the boat plug and sink the hard dinghy in shallow water to protect it from damage.

8. Secure Electronics, Charge Batteries, Check Pumps:

Shut down all electronics except for the electric bilge pumps. Charge both batteries so that they will have plenty of juice to run the bilge pumps. Test the float switch on each bilge pump. Lift up the float switch tab with your hand or a boat hook. Your pump should kick on within 1-2 seconds.

9. Put Out Anchors and Increase Scope:

If at anchor, use your three largest anchors--spread out in a Y-pattern--to offer your boat the best chance of survival. Attach an extra length of chain to the bottom of each rode to increase the catenary (curve) on your anchor line to help keep the anchor dug deep into the sea bottom.

As an alternative, use two anchors chained together in tandem. Shackle a long length of hefty chain to the crown of your main anchor. Attach a second anchor to the end of the chain. The two anchors will work together (in tandem) to hold you in the worst conditions.

Increase your anchor scope to 10:1. Beef up chafing gear where the anchor rode contacts your hull. Your boat will be tossed back and forth and pitched up and down. Strong chafing gear and anchor ground tackle will help prevent catastrophic failure.

10. Lock it and Leave It:

Under no circumstances should you stay aboard during an intense storm. This could lead to serious injury or worse. Lock your boat with a stout padlock. Check everything once more and evacuate the area. If you've done things right, your boat will take care of herself.


Follow these ten sailing tips to prepare your small cruising or racing sailboat to weather storms in port. You will be rewarded with the peace-of-mind that you have done everything possible for her survival--when heavy weather comes your way.

Captain John with 25+ years experience, teaches sailing skippers the skills they need for safer sailing anywhere in the world. As a SkipperTips member, you will receive fresh articles and videos to your inbox every week about a wide range of subjects. Join his website at www.skippertips.com.

Don’t be casual when the worst weather is forecast -  .. .  




by John Jamieson

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=84546

10:38 PM Thu 9 Jun 2011 GMT






Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.


News - USA and the World





























America's Cup Book Review: Winging It - Oracle Team USA's comeback *Feature by Richard Gladwell Sail-World.com/nz,




Rolex China Sea Race 2014 - nip and tuck for IRC honours by RHKYC and Guy Nowell, Sail-World Asia, Hong Kong


























HUD Vision: An interview with Afterguard Marine’s Alex Moret *Feature by David Schmidt, Sail-World USA Editor, Seattle








ISAF Match Race Rankings for 16 April 2014
ISAF Sailing World Cup Hyeres – World’s best to race on French Riviera
Rolex China Sea Race – Fleet off to a clean start
America's Cup: Expected de Ridder penalty should be reduced *Feature
World Youth Sailing Week – Second edition officially presented + Video
Rolex China Sea Race - Sailing classic returns
Les Voiles de St Barth – Fired up for battle
CNN Mainsail Down Under for the 75th JJ Giltinan Trophy - 18ft skiffs
Volvo Ocean Race: North Sails on outfitting the Volvo 65
Image gallery: James Cook High's Royal encounter on Steinlager 2 *Feature
Volvo Ocean Race - Maersk Line named shipping partner
Congressional Cup - Victory for Taylor Canfield and crew
SSV Oliver Hazard Perry joins America's Tall Ship fleet + Video
2014 Halifax – Saint-Pierre Ocean Race
Oyster Regatta Antigua - Glorious conditions prevail on final day
WWA Pro Card Qualifier - Pro Cards earned at Freedom Wake Park
Christmas Caribbean Rally - Top class sailors to compete
Earth Day boater tips
Anna Tunnicliffe - from CrossFit to Extreme 40's
Charleston Race Week - Photos by Chris Howell
Image Gallery: Stratis SL33 flies on the Waitemata   
Audi Melges 20- Sperry Topsider Charleston Race Week - Light final day   
Clipper Round the World Yacht Race - PSP Logistics prepares for USA   
ISAF Sailing World Cup Hyères - Crème of the crop to compete   
Congressional Cup: Luna Rossa makes podium in first event   
Int 14 World Championships 2015 launch new event website   
International Optimist Regatta Clinic and Team Race - Register now!   
Congressional Cup: World top rankers finish that way in Long Beach   
Sperry Top-Sider Charleston Race Week Day 3 finale   
America's Cup: Gino Morrelli outlines the new AC62 design   
Doyle Sails New Zealand signs Andrew Brown as One Design Manager   
America's Cup: Dean Barker's Blog - A sail with the Duke and Duchess *Feature   
29er World Youth Sailing Week Easter regatta - Day 1 and 2 overall   
C Thomas Clagett Jr Memorial Clinic/Regatta - Entries start to roll in   
50th Congressional Cup: See the delayed coverage and media conferences   
Clipper Race 10 Day 27: Closing stages - Qingdao to San Francisco   
Canfield, Williams, Bruni, Swinton in Congressional Cup final four   
Sperry Top-Sider Charleston Race Week - Day 2   
Audi Melges 20 Charleston Race Week - Perfect conditions in Charleston   
Oyster Regatta Antigua - Full on ocean conditions for day 3   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
X6XL VIR US