News Home Video Gallery Newsletters Photo Gallery Cruising Int
Sail-World.com : RYA's six hot tips for 'Creek Crawling':
RYA's six hot tips for 'Creek Crawling':

'Creek Crawling preview'    .

On your sailing boat do you feel more comfortable out in the ocean than in shallow waterways or rivers? Yet 'creek crawling' can be the most rewarding of adventures for the cruising sailor. The upper reaches of a river often go unexplored but usually offer stunning scenery and interesting places to moor.

Britain's Royal Yachting Associaiton (RYA) has come up with six vital tips to help you to navigate your next interesting creek or river.

Creek crawling 1 -  .. .  
1. Deep water
The deeper water usually flows near the outside of the bend. Keep this natural phenomena in mind when the buoyage starts to thin out. Often a sand bank or shallow patch on the inside of the bend is ready to catch the unwary or those thinking of taking a shortcut (Fig A).

2. Pick a side
When the buoyage becomes sparse, instead of looking for the middle of a channel, find and edge and stick to it (Fig B). If you are in the middle of a channel and suddenly lose depth there is no way of knowing where deep water is located. If however the echo sounder is used to locate one side of the channel when the depth reduces you will know which way to turn.

In the illustration (Fig C) we have chosen the starboard side of the channel. By following a constant depth on the echo sounder it will lead us around the river. If the depth reduces we turn to port and if it increases we turn to starboard.

Creek-crawling-2 -  .. .  
3. Tidal Heights
Tidal height dramatically changes what you see, compared to the charted view. A channel may look straight forward on the chart because it gives the view you’d get at the lowest low water. But a rising tide covering the banks makes the obvious channel disappear; leaving just a scattering of marks, so if in doubt note the bearing and distance to the next mark on a plan to indicates which way to go.

Most rivers get shallower as you travel upstream and require you to establish the tidal height to give you safe clearance. Remember the depths on the chart give the lowest depth expected and any predicted tidal height is added to it. Therefore if there is a depth of 2m on the chart and there is a tidal height of 3.7m, the actual expected depth would be 2m + 3.7m + 5.7m. Heights for many ports are available on the internet or the actual rise of tide can be calculated using information found in an almanac.

To work out a height:

When will we have 3.7m of tide?

(1) Enter HW time and fill in the boxes for each hour before and after HW (1301 UT)

(2) & (3) Mark in the heights of today’s HW and LW, draw a line between them

(4)Find 3.7m on the HW Hts scale.

(5)Draw a line downwards to intersect today’s HW/LW line, across to meet the curve and then down to the time scale.

(6)There will be 3.7m from about 1010 until 1540 UT

Creek-crawling-3 -  .. .  
4. Clearance
Allow sufficient clearance under the boat. If you have a keel and the propellers and rudder are protected, the clearance may be less than if the props and rudder would be the first to touch. The required clearance may also be affected if the bottom is hard rock or soft mud and whether the tide is rising tide or falling as greater margins are prudent with rocks and on falling tides. Proceed slowly and watch the echosounder. A look behind the boat will often indicate whether you are starting to get shallow as the wash from the props will start churning up mud or sandy coloured water.

5. Make a plan
Keep the all- important chart down below to stop it blowing away and instead draw a plan. Drawing a plan allows you to start building a mental picture of where you going as one bend in a river is often similar to another. Keep track of your position by crossing off key points and buoys as you go.

6. Taking the heat
Shallow water increases the chance of weed, sand and mud making its way into your engine seawater filter. Check the filters afterwards and keep an eye on your engine temperature during the trip.
.............

About the Royal Yachting Association:
The Royal Yachting Association (RYA), is the national body for all forms of boating, including dinghy and yacht racing, motor and sail cruising, RIBs and sports boats, powerboat racing, windsurfing, inland cruising and narrowboats, and personal watercraft. To learn more about the RYA go to http://www.rya.org.uk/


by Royal Yachting Assocation/Sail-World


  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=121972

9:11 PM Thu 8 May 2014GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.







Cruising USA



World ARC fleet bids farewell to Bali by World Cruising Club,










World ARC crews in Bali by World Cruising Club,


Could your sailing navigation use a tune-up? by Captain John Jamieson, Florida








The Boat Cookbook by BoatBooks,








World ARC fleet now arriving in Bali by World Cruising Club,










Pack this sailing gear for 'hands-free' lighting by Captain John Jamieson, Florida
























A case of crossed wires? A shocking situation! by Stuart Carruthers, RYA Cruising Manager,


OHPRI Teen Summer Camps make a splash
How amazingly awe-inspiring the Arctic really is
Boaters urged to attend anchoring meetings next week in Florida
New atlas provides thorough audit of marine life in the Southern Ocean
Canal Boating in the Alsace with the Galley Guys
World ARC fleet arrives in Darwin
Timeless Tonga - Charter sailing in a Polynesian paradise *Feature
A fine conclusion to the ARC Baltic 2014
Where in the world are our strongest corals?
Incredible efforts to save yacht from being lost at sea
ARC Baltic fleet visit six countries and six capitals in six weeks
Helen Island, Palau -a beautiful and unique place
Barnacle Busting
From Penguins to Polar Bears
Cornell turns back from the North West Passage
Polar research: Six priorities for Antarctic science
Missing German tourists in the hands of Abu Sayyaf Group
NCI granted dedicated VHF Channel
Positive news for cruising boats in Greece
Bivalves' ability to clean chemicals from waterways
Are You Sailing with 'Weak Links' in your sailing rigging?   
Week-long cruise turns into 16-year round-the-world voyage   
World ARC fleet cruising the Coral Coast   
Yacht penalized for calling unannounced into Port Resolution   
Galley Guys on the Malty Seas   
Blue Planet Odyssey - Beset in Arctic Bay ice + Video   
Garcia Yachts Exploration 45 - Jimmy Cornell's newest adventure   
Sustainable Seafood - How to purchase with confidence   
Risks to penguin populations continues   
ARC Baltic fleet head from Helsinki to Stockholm   
Follow these tips when anchoring   
Galley Guys meet the Spice Lady   
North American Rally to the Caribbean - Get prepared to head south   
If all else fails read the instructions!!   
ARC Baltic fleet cruising and anchoring in the Finnish archipelago   
Phuket Yacht Show: new kid on the block taking on PIMEX? *Feature   
Vanuatu Customs making life easier for visiting cruising yachts   
Baltic 4 Nations rally is now in full swing   
Tropical Storm Bertha expected to become a typhoon   
Flags at Sea, an infographic by John Tissott   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL NEW Cru USA
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT