sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Cruising Photo Gallery Video Gallery
Sail-World.com : Gladwell's Line: Riding shotgun on Emirates Team NZ's AC72 at 43.6kts
Gladwell's Line: Riding shotgun on Emirates Team NZ's AC72 at 43.6kts

'Sail-World’s Richard Gladwell (red wet weather gear) , checks out the wingsail twist as Emirates Team New Zealand’s AC72 rips across the Hauraki Gulf at speeds of over 40kts'    Chris Cameron/ETNZ©    Click Here to view large photo

Sail-World.com's NZ and America's Cup Editor, Richard Gladwell, spent three hours perched on the after beam of Emirates Team NZ's AC72 for a training session on the Hauraki Gulf. Sailing in winds of up to 25kts, the AC72 hit an amazing 43.6kts and didn't even feel like she was breaking into a sweat. He reports on Wednesday's race and test session.

Imagine you are standing on top of an Emirates jet on that final mad charge down the runway before takeoff.

The engines are screaming and every imperfection in the runway is magnified into the jolting that reverberates through the plane just before it leaves the ground.

Next, take that mental snapshot and overlay it on to a boat the dimensions of a tennis court (well three metres wider), flying down the harbour, a couple of metres above the sea, travelling at a speed of more than 40kts.

This is the surreal world of the AC72 catamaran and the 34th America’s Cup.

Today Emirates Team New Zealand’s skipper Dean Barker is putting his crew through a seven-hour programme of race practice and testing on Auckland's Hauraki Gulf, venue for the 2000 and 2003 America's Cups.

The AC72 is a boat like you’ve never seen or experienced before.

New Zealand has just emerged from her hangar, where she has been modified to incorporate changes from her first 16 days of trialling. The America’s Cup rules allow just 30 days of test sailing before January 31, 2013

Emirates Team New Zealand’s AC72 flies upwind at 20kts finishing a racing session on the Hauraki Gulf -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

We came across the black hulled, red bowed catamaran flying upwind in a stiff 15kt offshore breeze, as she finished her race practice session. She’s setting a very short hoist jib, the smallest in her inventory. The 40metre tall wingsail, longer than an Emirates A380 wing, is doing all the work.

Richard Gladwell with Dean Barker. Emirates Team New Zealand ACA72 testing on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©  
The first impression is of a very stiff platform (multihull-speak for the combination of hulls, beams, deck and supporting truss underneath the 40metre tall wingsail). There was no twisting. The whole boat is a single locked unit, as she charges into the moderate sea.

Next take is the body language of the crew, almost motionless in the boat, only occasionally moving the pump (winch) handles to adjust the sheet on the wingsail, or pressure up the hydraulics. Dean Barker guides rather than steers with minimal wheel movement. The AC72 sails smooth and fast – like the flying machine she is.

The crew have been on the water since just after 8am.

This is the tail end of the day’s racing phase where Emirates Team NZ simulates an America’s Cup course, complete with marks, and run through a race scenario complete with pre-start, fast reach and then the beats to windward and downwind legs, all within the constraints of the America’s Cup course boundaries. 'It’s a test of crew-work,' explains team boss Grant Dalton, as we clamber aboard. 'It went very well this morning.'

Aboard, our roller coaster phobia kicks in. We don’t like roller coasters – too much of the hang on, trust it knows where it is going, and won’t fly off the rails. The AC72 initially that feels like that. Does man control the machine, or will the machine control man?

We’ll soon find out.

Skipper Dean Barker has a very light touch on the wheel of the AC72 during the race session aboard Emirates Team New Zealand AC72 on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

Sitting still in the water in the AC72 means you are sailing at about eight knots. Full blast, as we were to soon find out, is about 43.6kts. But at that speed who is counting?.

The acceleration is enough to knock you flat, so you sit down and hang on to something solid or it’s over the back you go.

Today’s breeze is 20-25kts, a mix of rain squalls and sunshine. A typical Auckland southwesterly, offshore breeze.

A flick of the wheel and we are off. First on a short reach and then the gennaker is broken out and we begin the first screaming, shuddering charge downwind, climbing on to the leeward foil with consummate ease.

It’s a wild ride, but a good one.

The screaming sound is coming from the tail fin on the windward rudder. The faster you go the higher pitched the scream from the rudder. Then as it breaks free of the surface there is a blissful nanosecond of silence, giving a silent awesome flight, as though you are riding on the back of a giant mythical seabird swooping over the ocean.

Aside from the rudder scream, there’s no other noise on board. No creaking or groaning. No shouts between the crew. That takes a bit of getting used to as well.

The AC72 is wet and dry. Our position in the centre of the boat is dry. To windward the crew is in the firing line for water flying into the air as the tip of the windward foil kisses the water, throwing back a massive shower of spray, Southern Ocean style. Full wet weather gear is required.

Ray Davies sprints across the tramp during a gybe. The trick is stopping when you reach the other side -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

The mad runners

Suddenly one crew-member leaves his station and races over to the leeward hull, running a springing, moon-walking, step across the trampoline netting.

Another follows and then another, and you realise something is up.

The mad runners’ only problem is stopping when they reach the leeward side and are running downhill. The tall grinders, with their high centre of gravity are the worst, almost falling over the side. There’s no fence, just a mad grab for a pump handle to check themselves. This is definitely a boat for shorties.

A gybe is coming.

The lack of crew talk seems very weird until you realise they all talk through a networked on-board radio system in their helmets - which have little cigarette packet sized radios laminated into the helmet back. Outwardly the crew appears to communicate by mental telepathy. Reality is that communication is very clear – until someone has an audio failure in their helmet.

Emirates Team New Zealand AC72 testing on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo
Mid-gybe we actually drop off the foils as the speed plummets to 20kts, then turn complete, we’re off on another wild ride hitting speeds in the high 30’s early 40kts.

Our roller coaster phobia has eased - replaced by technical curiosity.

Are we going to nosedive? Not even close. Lying down on the deck peering through the netting at the leeward bow, it’s well clear of the water, and stays that way.

About 10nm offshore the fast, hard ride ends, the gennaker is furled and dropped. It is time to head upwind. There is a bit of a discussion in the back of the boat about an approaching squall. A few calls ashore reveal the wind will increase by only five knots or so.

Time to sheet on and go again.

Upwind there is no foiling, the AC72 just sails like a catamaran at speeds of about 20kts plus. That gives an apparent windspeed of about 46kts according to the number crunchers at the back – we’d guessed at 50kts - based on the wind in our face. The speed and motion of the boat, combined with the storm strength apparent wind requires you to keep a low profile, or risk being blown over.

The foils do have some effect, lifting the leeward hull – visually lowering the waterline, but she still sails with part of the hull immersed.

The degree of twist in the wingsail leech is just jaw-dropping.

There are over a thousand customised components in the wingsail which consists of two elements. The degree of control is such that the wingsail can be twisted in both the front and back elements, and individual sections, so the sail is almost like a soft mainsail – allowing the rig to be powered and depowered quickly, or just set for a particular windstrength.

Everything seems to be working incredibly well, and we start wondering what these guys are going to do for the next eight months.

That line of thinking is about to come to a sudden end.

The acceleration and 50kts of apparent wind require you to hang on tightly or be flicked over the aft beam - Emirates Team New Zealand AC72 testing on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

Foiling upwind?
We’re lying down admiring at this 40 metre structure working, almost breathing, in the breeze, when out of the corner of our eye we see the AC72 has climbed on to the leeward foil. Upwind foiling? Wow!

Quickly Dean Barker reigns in his frisky mare, dropping her on to the stern and stopping the boat. From the startled look on his face you can see that this feature wasn’t in the Owner’s Manual.

Another quick discussion, and it seems that the new fairing on the main beam has worked a little too well, making the AC72 literally take off, as it generates lift in the Force 10 apparent wind.

We set off again, powering up the rest of the leg at a more pedestrian 18kts. Again the AC72 takes flight in a rain squall, before once again being dropped back on her haunches.

At the top of the course, the decision is made to remove the fairing behind the main beam, which has been designed in an aerofoil shape, like a plane wing. But it has worked too well, taking the AC72 from sailing, into foiling and then into the realm of full flight.

While the fairing is cut away, it’s time for a look around and a bit of a chat.

First this AC72 is an incredibly simple boat. She has been designed that way because of the reduced crew numbers. There are just 11 crew instead of the 17 on the monohulls used in the previous editions of the America’s Cup.

The jib is on a self tacker – one less adjustment to make in a tack. The mainsheet is just a single sheet leading from the winch to the end of the wingsail.

Emirates Team New Zealand.The Y-Truss structure, with carbon cables almost as thick as your arm locks the platform on the AC72 -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo
The truss below the platform deck is what gives the AC72 her rigidity. There is carbon cable under there that is almost as thick as your arm.

There are no running backstays. The backstays are almost fixed, but are eased slightly downwind.

With the fairing removed, from the starboard side only, it’s time for another run and a beat.

We look through the decking at the leeward bow as we sail through the Zone of Death accelerating from 10kts to close to 40kts. (Typically as any high performance yacht or catamaran bears away from the wind and rapidly accelerates the bow dips, sometimes submerging, and very occasionally turning into a full nosedive as so often seen in the smaller AC45’s).

There’s none of this submarining with the AC72. The knuckle of the bow is clear. The foils do their job and we’re up, up and away again.

Ten miles out we turn again – having hit between 41 and almost 44kts depending on whether you believe the analyst’s computer or the crew readouts. Oddly enough New Zealand doesn’t feel that pressed - about three-quarter pace - and gives the impression that there was still more untapped speed potential.

The crew look remarkably relaxed, and there’s no edginess or talk of being even close to the limit – wherever that might be.

We turn upwind again. Has the removal of the fairing done the trick?

That’s what months and months of development testing and incremental gain are all about. The sum of those little things uncovered in testing will add up to a significant edge, come the Louis Vuitton and America’s Cup regattas. Time is the scarce commodity. More testing time should give more speed refinements.

Emirates Team NZ heads upwind into 25kt winds and rain squalls. The AC72 just hurtles up the course in these conditions - an amazing piece of sailing engineering. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo

Upwind in 50kts apparent

The AC72 starts another run upwind. You can feel the crew applying the pressure now. She’s more loaded, but with no sign of the dreaded lift off. The design and engineering magnificence of this AC72 comes to the fore as she hurls herself up the course into an approaching rain squall, in 50kts of apparent wind.

Five minutes up the track there’s a crack from the lower wingsail.

Barker stops instinctively. The crew all turn to the source of the noise, and then to a man, all look skywards. Nothing is descending from the Heavens. The relief is palpable.

The bang is the sound of a wing rib fracturing. A consequence of some of the changes made while the AC72 was in the shed. Loads have shifted.

The crew are constantly wet with spray from the tip of the daggerboard when it clips the surface of the sea. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo
After another discussion, the decision is made to sail some more on the other tack, at reduced load and take the pressure off the broken rib.

'It’s not big deal,' reports Dalton back to Barker, after a close look and a chat. 'We should have picked up that it could happen. We need to look at a few other things too,' he adds.

'It’s a three hour repair,' Dalton says later of the broken rib. 'We could have fixed it overnight and gone sailing tomorrow, but won’t because there’s supposed to be another front coming through.'

Five minutes later, and we are a lot closer to Auckland. New Zealand picks up a tow line from the chase boat and heads for home at 25kts. Session over, but there’s now plenty on the work and learning list.

Shoe-horning the AC72 into her berth in Auckland’s Viaduct harbour is not easy. 'We’ve never done it before in this strength and direction of breeze,' confides Dalton on the way up the Waitemata harbour.

The tow is dropped off Prince’s Wharf and we experience the power and pace of the AC72 for one last time as Barker lines New Zealand up for an incredibly small gap in the sea wall.

The two 'tugs' – specially designed inflatables with central rotating Yamaha outboards are hitched up and do all the sideways work. The main chase boat is lashed alongside too. Her four 300hp Yamahas at the ready if the AC72 gets caught in a gust and takes charge.

The berthing operation goes smoothly, including two sideways shunts though the hole in the seawall and then under the Viaduct Bridge.

The sun comes out. The wind has dropped in the shelter of the harbour. A mass of chase boat, design and shore crew swarm aboard and the debriefings start. It’s a happy excited group.

This has been a very good day, an unbelievable experience. But there’s a long way to go before this team’s America’s Cup campaign is signed off.

Emirates Team New Zealand during an earlier testing the AC72 on the Hauraki Gulf. -  Chris Cameron-ETNZ©   Click Here to view large photo


by Richard Gladwell

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=103801

4:22 AM Thu 15 Nov 2012GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.

Click for further information on
2013 America's Cup

Related News Stories:

15 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Artemis Racing sails for first time in San Francisco
13 Nov 2012  Fly Emirates Business Class to Europe and support NZ Optimist Coaching
13 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ out of shed after turbo-charging
11 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ AC72 gets ready for Round 2 of testing
10 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ goes for the high jump
10 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Luna Rossa trains on the Hauraki Gulf
09 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ - getting from side to side
08 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ's Nick Holroyd on the design process
05 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Images of the Artemis Racing launch and christening
04 Nov 2012  America's Cup: Luna Rossa - Questions from the NZ sailing media
MORE STORIES ...






News - USA and the World

Brian Carlin, On Board Reporter for Team Vestas Wind reports on the delights of using the 'bathroom' while clocking along at 20kts plus in the Southern Ocean. ... [more]  

At the RC44 Oman Cup the 10 competing teams enjoyed a great sailing day on the Gulf of Oman for the penultimate day of the 2014 Championship Tour. Racing started in a seven-knot north-westerly breeze which built steadily throughout the day. ... [more]  

The world’s largest sailing media group, Sail-World.com, held its first continental group meeting at the Marine Equipment Trade Show (METS) this week. METS is the world’s largest B2B Marine show and this year it had a record 1358 exhibitors and more than 21,000 Marine industry representatives. ... [more]  

At the ISAF Sailing World Cup Final in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 2013 World Champion Florian Gruber is expecting the Open Formula Kiteboarding event to be the, 'strongest fleet this year.' ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race: Fleet heads into the Southern Ocean + Videos *Feature by Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com/nz
At the latest report, Volvo Ocean Race Control, reported Dongfeng Race Team as being the leader in the second leg to Abu Dhabi. Winds were reported to be 18-25kts, with Team Vestas Wind and Team SCA recording the highest boatspeed of 20kts. ... [more]  

2014 ISAF Sailing World Cup Final - Abu Dhabi - The ISAF Sailing World Cup Final in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates is set to be an 'experience of a lifetime' according to American Women's 470 sailor Briana Provancha. ... [more]  

America's Cup: Source named in Bermuda venue leak *Feature by Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com/nz
San Diego sports journalist, Matt Calkins, has named one of the sources of comment that the 35th America's Cup will be held in the British Oversea Territory of Bermuda. Writing in the San Diego Union Tribune, Calkins claimed that San Diego Tourism Authority CEO, Joe Terzi, had told the U-T. ... [more]  

2014 RC44 Oman Cup - Consistency was hard to come by and no team managed to stay in the top half of the fleet in all three races. Chris Bake’s Team Aqua (GBR) was the most consistent team of the day picking up 11-points, Nika and Charisma both added 12-points to their overall score. ... [more]  

Team Vestas Wind’s Rob Salthouse perches perilously on the edge of his bunk, eyes fixed on a well-earned freeze-dried feast, steam snaking up towards his nostrils. ... [more]  

Ensuring a safe fuel supply for America’s 12 million registered boat owners may have to wait, said Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that the agency will further delay the final rule on how much ethanol refiners must blend into the nation’s gasoline supply under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). ... [more]  

Yates Cup: US supermaxi Rio100 wins first offshore race *Feature by Richard Gladwell/Sail-World.com/nz
The supermaxi Bakewell-White design, Rio100 (Manouch Moshayedi, USA) has won her first race, sailing in the Yates Cup. She finished at 7.30am on Saturday morning, followed by the Botin 80 Beau Geste 14 minutes later with the Volvo 70 Giacomo 67minutes later. ... [more]  

The wind continued to blow on day four of the Airwaves Noumea PWA Dream Cup to produce another action packed day in New Caledonia, as a further three races for the men and four races for the women were completed in 15-25 knot winds. By the end of the day Ben Van Der Steen headed to the top of the rankings after a near perfect display. ... [more]  

The Oman RC44 Cup delivered another challenging sailing day for the fleet competing in the final event of the 2014 Championship Tour. Consistency was hard to come by and no team managed to stay in the top half of the fleet in all three races. Team Aqua was the most consistent team of the day picking up 11-points, Nika and Charisma both added 12-points to their overall score. ... [more]  

The fast southeast sailing continues in the Volvo Ocean Race but where excitement and adrenaline began—discomfort has taken over. We’re seeing an average of about 25 knots of wind but the sea state is making life somewhat miserable! ... [more]  

To summarize the last 24 hours of the Volvo Ocean Race in one word: change. The weather, the water, the sails, and our bodies are all equally (and rapidly) changing. The first full day at sea, we have experienced what some trips see in a week—if they’re lucky enough. However, that said, change can also be frustrating. ... [more]  

A new and exciting Viper 640 European Event in 2015 has been announced by Rondar Boats Ltd. Lake Garda is one of the great sailing venues and already there are signed up entries from the UK and Australia, with potential entries from the USA. It’s a serious sailing regatta and Italian holiday in one event! ... [more]  

On Monday 17 November, an impressive line-up of speakers at 13th International Sailing Summit shared ideas and best practice from around the world, demonstrating how the sailing industry can change to increase and retain participation, through innovation, technology and cultural changes. British Cycling has seen its membership grow by 567% since 2005. ... [more]  

GC32 Racing Tour: State-of-the-art in catamaran design, the GC32 is attracting considerable interest due to its conceptual similarity to the AC72 and AC62 foiling catamarans pioneered in the America’s Cup. However as the GC32s are smaller one designs with soft sail rigs, they provide both professional teams and private owners with the opportunity to experience airborne catamaran racing. ... [more]  

Designed primarily for single-handed or double-handed racing, the high-performance monohulls have also been a fixture in such East Coast distance races as Newport-to-Bermuda and Marblehead-to-Halifax. Now the Class 40 is coming to the historic Annapolis-to-Newport Race for the first time. ... [more]  

Spectacular performance by Bakewell-White maxi early in first race *Feature by Richard Gladwell/Sail-World.com/nz
The revamped Bakewell-White supermaxi, Rio 100 (Manouch Moshayedi) turned in an impressive performance in the opening stages of the Yates Cup. Sailing against a variety of benchmarks which included a a Volvo 70, a Botin 80 and an ORMA 60, Rio 100 came from behind to enjoy an impressive lead over the monohulls after 90 minutes of sailing. ... [more]  

As promised the wind arrived on the third day of the Airwaves Noumea PWA Dream Cup to provide an enthralling day of challenging racing in winds ranging from 10-25 knots. After almost seven hours of racing three eliminations have been completed for the men, whilst four races have been completed for the women. ... [more]  

America's Cup: Team New Zealand responds to Venue rumours *Feature by Richard Gladwell/Sail-World.com/nz
Emirates Team New Zealand has responded to reports published in Bermuda and mainland USA, that Bermuda has been selected as venue for the 35th America's Cup. In a media release sent mid-afternoon, New Zealand time, Emirates Team NZ CEO Grant Dalton said in response to unconfirmed reports that Bermuda had won the right to host the 35th America’s Cup, that the team had not been told of a decision ... [more]  

Amidst a 10% growth report on having issued over 9000 certificates worldwide in 2014, the recent Annual General Meeting of the Offshore Racing Congress is pleased to announces numerous improvements approved for use in the ORC Rules and policies for 2015. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15, Leg 2. Team Alvimedica’s OBR Amory Ross reports on the Leg 2 start and progress. Well, now we know what it feels like to be shot from of a cannon! That was utter insanity. When the gun went I think there was almost no wind at all—two knots or something—but as we slowly crept out from under the shadow of Table Mountain it changed drastically. ... [more]  

The start of Leg 2 offered all the wind conditions you could want. I will not lie: I was pretty nervous to begin leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race (Mom called it ‘Stage Fright’); I think the whole team was pretty nervous. Here we are, having confidently completed the first leg of the Volvo Ocean Race—after 27 days at sea! ... [more]  

The ISAF Sailing World Cup Final in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates is set to be 'an experience of a lifetime' according to American Women's 470 sailor Briana Provancha. Some of the world’s top Men’s and Women’s 470 teams will make up the individual fleets with some excellent racing on the cards. ... [more]  

After finishing third in the annual RC44 match race championships, Team Nika seem to have got a taste for the podium. It was a tough day on the water for the start of fleet racing at the RC44 Oman Cup, with many teams struggling for consistency. ... [more]  

St Barth Cata Cup 2014 - Game on! by Dominique Ladouceur
The boats are ready and the sailors have all had a chance to test their catamarans in a very rigorous St-John Bay. The conditions will be windy at the start of this seventh edition of the St-Barth Cata Cup. Sailors will be facing winds from the west at 18 knots with gusts at 22 knots on the first race day. ... [more]  

While more modifications are being mooted for the champion supermaxi yacht Wild Oats XI as part of her preparation for next month’s Rolex Sydney Hobart yacht race, a high-profile new member of the team was revealed on Sydney Harbour today. ... [more]  

Wild Oats XI and Audi are ready to give the 2014 Rolex Sydney Hobart a shot! Photos by Andrea Francolini. ... [more]  

Volvo Ocean Race: Meek's tips pay dividend in Leg 2 squalls and calms *Feature by Bob Fisher, Cape Town, South Africa
The seven competing boats in the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-2015 roughly gathered at 6pm local time (1600 Zulu) in a south-easterly wind that peaked at 30-40 knots, which had the local habit of dying away to nothing in places along the shoreline in the lee of Table Mountain. The clever skippers has sought advice from Geoff Meek, a local with a mass of experience ... [more]  

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing (ADOR), the Emirate’s entry into the Volvo Ocean Race 2014–15, cast off on the next leg of the epic, round-the-world race on Wednesday evening hoping to complete a hat-trick of victories in the best place possible – the team’s home port of Abu Dhabi. ... [more]  

The waiting game continued on day two of the Airwaves Noumea Dream Cup PWA event, but the competitors’ patience wasn’t rewarded on this occasion as the wind remained too light for racing. A few sailors were tempted out onto the water, but apart from a few reaches of sporadic planing, the wind wasn’t enough and soon dropped back after showing promise in the early afternoon. ... [more]  

Barcelona World Race skippers named as scientific agents
Volvo Ocean Race: Stop-start battle to the Cape of Good Hope
Volvo Ocean Race: Leg 2 starts at high speed in 35kt winds
Volvo Ocean Race - Team SCA off to gutsy leg 2 start
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final - Heroes and champions in Nacra 17 fleet
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final - Talented Finn pack all set
RC44 Oman Cup - Synergy crowned RC44 Match Race Champions
Volvo Ocean Race: Leg 2 start - action replay video from Cape Town
Volvo Ocean Race: Team Alvimedica on tour in Cape Town
15th Ambassadors Cup - Brazil claims victory
Route du Rhum - Alex Pella first ever Spanish skipper to finish first
SSL Finals 2014 - Star World Champion Stanjek to race with Olesen
ISAF Sailing World Cup Melbourne: Finn fight looming on Port Phillip
Rugby man appointed Chief Executive Officer of Yachting Australia
Welcome back: Congressional Cup Joins Alpari World Match Racing Tour
18ft Skiffs: Smeg's second Red-Line run down Sydney harbour in 40kts *Feature
Volvo Ocean Race: Start Wednesday - Cyclone season awaits Leg 2 fleet
Airwaves Noumea PWA Dream Cup - Opening day in New Caledonia
RORC Transatlantic Race - Competitive fleet ready to race
Volvo Ocean Race: Leg 2 Media Conference - Full replay *Feature
Volvo Ocean Race - Team Vestas Wind ready to race   
Volvo Ocean Race: Young sailors get behind ADOR ahead of Leg 2   
18fters: Getting through the 'Death Zone' in a 35kt breeze *Feature   
Volvo Ocean Race: Sam Davies speaks openly about the first leg *Feature   
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final: Exciting 49er and 49erFX action expected   
America's Cup: Significant changes made to Protocol, but issues remain *Feature   
2014 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race - the 70th   
Stoke Beer 18ft Skiff Auckland Champs: Knight Frank lead after 5 races   
ISAF Sailing World Cup Final - RS:X elite Abu Dhabi bound   
120 boat start line for Tasar Worlds in Busselton   
Melges 24 U.S. Nationals - Full Throttle team grabs their sixth title   
RC44 Oman Cup - Grand final showdown on the horizon   
Visit Doyle Sails New Zealand at METS 2014   
Top Kiwi Finn sailor debuts in the 2014 Star Sailors League Finals   
2014 Butler Cup - Shane Young wins match race regatta   
Adventures of a Sailor Girl: News and interviews from Nov 16 show *Feature   
2014 Melges 24 U.S. National Championship - Moon wind   
Australian 18ft Skiffs: 40kt winds cancel race but Witt sails + Video   
2014 Melges 24 US National Championship - Day 2 images by Joy Dunigan   
Volvo Ocean Race: Abu Dhabi are the Kings of Cape Town   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL NEW US
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT