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Tom Slingsby interview, Olympic scene, news from Oz and the world

by Rob Kothe and the Sail-World Team on 21 Nov 2013
Oracle Team USA Slingsby. This was the 45. Might there be a bigger one? ACEA - Photo Gilles Martin-Raget © http://photo.americascup.com/
This week we have published the first two parts of our interview series with Tom Slingsby – on the America’s Cup 35 and the boats... there are lots of interesting revelations... In Part I, we asked about Jimmy Spithill’s press conference mantra ‘we can win this.’

Tom said ‘For me when we were down 6-1 was probably my lowest point in regards to thinking we could win. I certainly did not share Jimmy’s confidence then.

‘I think that was the day we made the wing tune changes. But then we went out the next day and we lost the next two by ten seconds and I really noticed a step up in the performance of the boat. I realized how close we were in foiling the boat upwind, stably. We would pop out every now and then and I realized foiling upwind was really a possibility here and then we were down 8-1.

In Part II, Tom explains why foiling needs to stay ... 'We have taken such a massive step forward it would be a shame to take a step backwards now and the America’s Cup is the biggest event in the sailing world at the moment.

‘It has got to be sailed in the most high performance, most spectacular boats because that is the one event that gets played to non-sailors around the world and that’s the way we have to attract more viewers, having the most amazing boats with the best sailors and the best competition in the world. It has to be a spectacle, the America’s Cup, and foiling is the only way to do that properly.'

This is a must read interview set, we will publish part III on Monday and in that Tom gets stuck right in... Then we will start an even longer series with Jimmy Spithill.


Just four days before entries close for the ISAF World Sailing Cup - Melbourne and the Invited classes at Sail Melbourne. (It runs from Dec 1st to eighth).The full Australian Sailing Team and Development Squad will be racing and there will be some interesting new combinations looking ahead to Rio. The big news now is the 15 Chinese crews led by London 2012 Olympic Gold Medallist and 2012 Rolex Female Sailor of the year, Lijia Xu, which spearheads excellent support from Asia at the World Cup in Melbourne. With Japan now set to stage the 2020 Olympic Games, the Melbourne event will become even more important in years ahead says Event Director and Olympic Gold Medallist Mark Turnbull.

Online entries can be still be made for both the Olympic classes and the 2013 Sail Melbourne Invited Classes. Entries close on November 26th there are already more than 550 athletes from 23 countries entered.

The full suite of classes for the Rio 2016 and Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, will be contested in Melbourne.


The Invited Classes are Laser Radial Men, Laser 4.7, Men and Women’s Kiteboard, Viper, 420, 29er, Optimist, OK dinghy, 2.4R, SKUD18, Liberty Access and Cadet Dinghy.


Just leaving METS in Amsterdam, (amazingly the sun is shining at Schipol airport, writing this wearing sunglasses in the terminal.) We will be publishing more interviews from there over the next week. But we can report right now that the mood was very good from the Australian exhibitors. Over the weekend, we will show you a fun new product, this time from Denmark, which we suspect, one day just about every sailor will have.

Lots of news today from our Sail-World network around the world. And that network is about to grown even larger, but that is a story for another day.

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