Please select your home edition
Edition
Giacomo Yacht Sale

Sail-World Mailbag- Readers comments from the last week or so

by Sail-World Readers on 9 Mar 2011
Courageous - 12 Metre 2010 North American Championships - but for the Olympics?? George Bekris © http://www.georgebekris.com

Sail-World readers comment on America's Cup and other pressing matters.

We have produced their comments below:

(NB We will only publish letters where the writer is identified, unless there is a a very good reason to maintain confidentiality. )


_____________________________________________________________________________________________


Sender: Nis Peter Lorentzen

Message: Yes, foiling Moths with wing masts and kiteboards are part of the answer, but how do we get the 'other' 3 billion people in the developing world interesting in sailing?

Sailing has the advantage over many other sports that spectacular 'equipment' can potentially add a lot to the public image and media attractiveness of the sport. If we go back to the pre-WWII years of the Olympics, the larger keelboats that were used were Skerry Cruisers/Square Meter Yachts and Meter Yachts. At that time these boats were the most advanced, fastest and beautiful yachts ever produced.

I believe that the public image and media attractiveness of Olympic sailing would increase dramatically today if we learned from Olympic sailing a century ago, as well as from the America's Cup, and allowed each country to participate with a 12 Meter yacht again! Our entire Western tradition of recreational sailing was shaped by early sailing heroes like Lipton, Fife, Herreshoff, Vanderbilt, Sparkman & Stevens, etc.

Sailing represents freedom, adventure, heritage, competition, glamor, technology, nature, oceans, wind power, and many other positive attributes.

Would a 12 Meter Olympic keelboat match racing discipline attract the very best sailing heroes in the world (think Conner, Bond, Koch, Bertrand, Melges, Turner, Coutts, etc.)?

Would the size, beauty, majesty, heritage, glamor and inspiration of a 12 Meter Olympic 'flagship' yacht attract millions of potential new sailors to the sport, and thereby indirectly benefit all the less expensive and widespread boat classes, and attract more sponsors than small boats?

Without a doubt!

Furthermore, the America's Cup defender abandoned the 12 Meter Yacht (IACC) just at a time when large developing countries, like China, were finally able to participate. With the ISAF and IOC stepping into this vacuum, and re-introducing the Olympic 12 Meter Yacht (IACC) in 2016, China, India, Indonesia, Brazil, etc. will be able, for the first time, to put together their own national 12 Meter Yacht teams, and significantly raise the profile of sailing in these countries representing 3 billion people, and inspiring millions of new sailors!

Combining the greatest sailing heroes of all times AND the most impressive and beautiful Olympic 12 Meter Yacht 'flagship' would not only help sailing in the Western world, but also bring the sport to a whole new world which has never experienced sailing.

Best regards

Nis Peter Lorentzen
Founder
Scandinavian Cruisers


Related News Item: Kiteboarding on the Olympic menu? Here's why...

Link to News: http://www.sail-world.com/indexs.cfm?nid=81092

Message sent from : Asia Racing

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Sender: John Teisen

Message: Dear Sir

I happened to discover your last report on the internet and took particular note of your picture of the new Shag Rubble.

My brother-in-law who lives in Christchurch told me that Cave Rock is also damaged. As it is one of my favorite places to visit whenever I am in Christchurch and is the source of many happy memories over the years, I was saddened by his news. Nevertheless, I have searched the web but found no reference to its post-earthquake condition.

Because you are a local resident (Ed: Sorry we live in Devonport, Auckland), I imagine you are aware of its present condition. Accordingly, could you please advise me in a reply to this message whether Cave Rock is damaged and, if possible, send me a photo or refer me to a website that contains a photo of the damage.

Your assistance will be very much appreciated.

Yours sincerely

John Teisen

Related News Item: Christchurch Yacht Club report from the Commodore

Link to News: http://www.sail-world.com/indexs.cfm?nid=80821

Message sent from : Australia Racing
______________________________________________________________________________________________

Sender: Bruce Spedding

Message: Agree 100% - pitting the two 'board sports' against each other, kiteboarding cannot be ignored just like windsurfing could not be ignored before, and selecting only one will be detrimental to the future of sailing sports at the Olympics. The traditionalists still have the rest of the sailing world stage to play with.

Related News Item: Board or Kite-Board: Why not having both in the Olympics?

Link to News: http://www.sail-world.com/indexs.cfm?nid=80792

Message sent from : New Zealand Racing

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Sender: Nick Gray

Message: Absolutely loving this initiative to release 1987 Cup video footage.

my best childhood memories are of the cup in freo, 10 mins from our house when i was about 8 years old

well done and keep it going!

Related News Item: America's Cup: The Freo Files - 'A bunch of Pommy lawyers'

Link to News: http://www.sail-world.com/indexs.cfm?nid=80615

Message sent from : Australia Racing

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Sender: Pierre A Varreon (France)

Message:

You know I love your Country, thus our thoughts are going to New Zealand and the beautiful people of this extraordinary Nation and especially to the City of Christchurch in where I spent several wonderful days in 2008.

For the third time in less than 6 months Aotearoa had to cope with one major disaster.

Let's altogether tell your Nation that we are spiritually, mentally, friendly, possibly materialistically standing by you in those dreadful times, our thoughts are directed to all of you New Zealanders. I know that once again you will teach us a magnificent lesson of bravery and courage.

Because of New Zealand is constructed from the origin with the bricks of hard labor, the achievement of pride and the cement of love.

I respect and love you very much People of New Zealand who so many times welcomed me so cheerfully.

God bless all of you and lets brace it up altogether in the world and sailing community you so brilliantly represent.

Pierre A Varreon, Paris, France 02 22 2011

Related Newsletter: Sail-World New Zealand
RS Sailing 660x82Insun - AC ProgramSouthern Spars - 100

Related Articles

An interview with Patrick Kennedy about the Ida Lewis Distance Race
I interviewed Patrick Kennedy, chair of the 2017 ILDR, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution. With this year’s Ida Lewis Distance Race set to unfurl the weekend of August 18-20, I caught up with Patrick Kennedy, chair of the 2017 ILDR, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the event’s new partnership with the 2017 J/Fest New England.
Posted on 14 Aug
An interview with Marianne Davis about the CORK International Regatta
I interviewed Marianne Davis, co-chair of the CORK International Regatta, to learn about the regatta’s state of affairs. While the various CORK regattas' registration lists include international sailors, these events are some of the gemstones in Sail Canada’s yearly championship calendar, making them of extra importance to Canadian sailors. I recently caught up with Marianne Davis, co-chair of the 2017 event, via email, to learn more about the CORK International Regatta’s evolution and its current state of affairs.
Posted on 7 Aug
A Q&A with the RORC’s Nick Elliott about the 2017 Rolex Fastnet Race
I caught up with Nick Elliott, RORC Racing Manager, via email, to learn more about the world-famous Rolex Fastnet Race. When one stops to consider the world’s best ocean races, the Royal Offshore Racing Club’s Rolex Fastnet Race, which starts on Sunday, August 6, 2017, is never far from mind. I caught up with Nick Elliott, RORC Racing Manager, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the amount of work that goes into pulling off this world-famous regatta.
Posted on 1 Aug
Ian Walker - Musto Ambassador on the Volvo Ocean Race, America's Cup
Ian Walker on his Volvo Ocean Race win, why food and clothing are so important offshore, his views on the America's Cup We speak to Musto ambassador Ian Walker about his Volvo Ocean Race win, why food and clothing are so important offshore, his views on the America's Cup, his new desk job, sailing for fun, and 20 years of the John Merricks Sailing Trust.
Posted on 23 Jul
Black Jack Yachting. Bigger boat. Bigger team. Even bigger performance
Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus. Some were sail makers, like Skipper Mark Bradford and also Vaughan Prentice from North Sails’ Brisbane loft. Others were riggers, such as Bruce Clarke, and there are even boat builders, like Gary van Lunteren, as well as Ash Deeks.
Posted on 20 Jul
A Q&A with Tom Trujillo about the Transpacific Race’s 49th running
Sail-World interviewed Tom Trujillo, the Transpac Race’s PRO, via email to learn more about this classic bluewater race. The Transpac Race (est 1906) is in a rarefied group of four races that are considered sailing’s greatest bluewater Corinthian challenges, and it welcomes a wildly diverse fleet of bluewater-worthy boats. The 49th running of this classic race is currently underway, so Sail-World caught up with Tom Trujillo, the race’s principal race officer, via email to learn more.
Posted on 7 Jul
Gladwell's Line - America's Cup returns to its new home and thinking
Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness and will open a new era of America's Cup, New Zealand and World Sailing. A rookie crew won the most prestigious trophy in sailing, and one of the most difficult to win in any sport.
Posted on 29 Jun
SuperFoilers Are Go!
SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets in the great scheme of things, they come together in the one form as harmoniously as a Rolls Royce, and also deliver intense energy way past the sum of their parts, just like some amazing band.
Posted on 28 Jun
A Q&A with Kimball Livingston about San Francisco high school sailing
I emailed with my friend and colleague Kimball Livingtston to learn about San Francisco’s latest sailing revolution. I started hearing whispers of shifts in the San Francisco Bay high school sailing scene a couple of months ago. A few inquiries led me to my good friend and colleague Kimball Livingston, a world-class sailor, scribe, and StFYC staff commodore who isn’t one to keep his seaboots dry when the topic turns to opportunities for the next sailing generation. I caught up with KL via email to learn more.
Posted on 13 Jun
A Q&A with Andrew Howe about winning the 2015 Marion to Bermuda Race
I interviewed Andrew Howe, the 2015 Marion to Bermuda Race’s winning co-navigator, to learn more about their race. In 2015, skipper Greg Marston and the crew of Ti, a 1967 Alden Mistral, racing under celestial rules, were the overall winners of the Marion Bermuda Race Founders Division, beating boats that were enjoying GPS accuracy. On the eve of the 2017 edition of the race, I reached out to Andrew Howe, the team’s co-navigator, to gain perspective on this impressive win and hear about his 2017 plans.
Posted on 7 Jun