Please select your home edition
Edition
Marine Resource 2016

Rio de Janeiro achieves 50% treatment of sewage outflow

by Jeni Bone on 26 Aug 2014
The ecoboat of Guanabara Limpa project collects debris in Guanabara Bay during a training sesion of Aquece Rio International Sailing Regatta. Secretaria de Estado do Ambiente do Rio http://www.rj.gov.br
State Secretary of Rio de Janeiro, Leonardo Espindola has told the parliament and media that Rio has achieved 50% treatment of sewage to its waterways, two years out from the start of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

Following the Olympic test event, Aquece Rio, which ran 2 to 8 August in Guanabara Bay and involved 320 athletes from 34 countries and 23 Olympic medallists competing in 10 Olympic classes, reports and feedback from athletes say the host city is making progress in the massive task of reducing pollution and untreated sewage flow to venues of the 2016 Olympic Games.


According to the Rio Organizing Committee, tests show that water quality is now acceptable, which is confirmed by State Secretary of Rio de Janeiro, Leonardo Espindola, who adds that he is confident the city will achieve targets of 80% in two years.

The General Manager of Sustainability, Accessibility and Legacy of Rio 2016 Tanya Braga, and oceanographer David Zee assured the parliament that the work was on track, through the concerted effort of Eco-barriers, Eco-boats, Rio Handling Units (RTUs) waste bins and the new Waste Treatment Centre. There are now 12 Eco-barriers in use, preventing rubbish from entering the Bay, and another seven will be implemented in 2015.

Espindola described the water in Rio’s magnificent Bay as 'not as bad as people claim, but not as good as others think'. In fact, the return of seahorses has been taken as a sign of improvement in the quality of the water. 'It shows that we are on track,' he said.

As for water outfall, he stated 'Our aim is not to treat 80% of the Bay but to treat 80% of the sewage. We have reached approximately 50% primary and secondary treatment. We will still improve on this. Having 100% is a goal to be pursued by the next generations.'


As Tanya Braga explained: 'Our major concern from day to day is the conditions for sporting events held on the Bay. We need to understand that the Bay is a great venue and the water quality is not equal across the Bay. Comparing the water near the airport and further out near Niterói, it is very different. The Bay has some natural processes that help.


'In Area 1, the water circulates, and changes daily. If we look at the five regions in the northwest of the Bay, the changes are slow. Near the landfill in Fundão, the water may take 40 days to be renewed. This creates conditions for pollution to be greater. Our concern for the well-being of athletes is a top priority. We follow the data of the water, and they show us that where we have scheduled competition, the data is consistent over the past three years. In the competition area, the quality is good.'

The oceanographer David Zee said he was most perturbed about the rubbish and chemical pollution in the area near the Marina da Glória, where boats will start competition.

Cedae (State Company for Water and Sewage) in Rio is working on upgrading the sewer at Marina da Glória, aiming for completion by the end of 2015.

'We are currently undertaking bacteriological treatments to minimize pollution at Marina da Glória,' the organisation stated.
Not up for consideration, even in the event that water quality deteriorates between now and the Games, is relocating sailing events to nearby coastal and resort cities such as Buzios, which had been suggested by Brazilian sailors.


Espindola said: 'We rule out completely the possibility of holding events elsewhere. We want to keep the sailing and water-based events in a radius of 30km to ensure there’s a sense of the spirit of an Olympic city. And we cannot give up on fixing the water quality in the Bay. If today we have acceptable conditions, in two years we will have even better conditions!'

More at www.rio2016.com/en

Ancasta Ker 33 660x82Barz Optics - San Juan Worlds Best EyewearMackay Boats

Related Articles

A Q&A with Dick Neville, Quantum Key West Race Week’s RC chairman
I caught up with Dick Neville, Race Committee chair for the Quantum Key West Race Week, to learn more about the event. For the past 30 years, international sailors have gathered in Key West, Florida, each January for Key West Race Week, a regatta that has achieved legendary status due to its calendar dates, its location, and the impressive level of competition and racecourse management that this storied event offers. I caught up with Dick Neville, Race Committee chair for this year’s Quantum KWRW, to learn more.
Posted on 16 Jan
A Q&A with Daniel Smith, the Clipper Race’s new deputy race director
I talked with Daniel Smith, the Clipper Round The World Race’s new deputy race director, to learn more about his role. I was fortunate to sail with Daniel Smith [36, SCO], skipper of “Derry~Londonderry~Doire” for the 2015/2016 edition of the Clipper Round The World Race, when the fleet reached Seattle last spring. Now, Smith has been hired as the event’s deputy race director-a job that will test many of the skills that he polished as a skipper. I caught up with Smith via email to learn more about his new job.
Posted on 9 Jan
Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race - Suck it up, sunshine!
The 72nd start of the iconic blue water classic had 300,000 spectators lining the foreshores of Sydney Harbour The 72nd start of the iconic blue water classic had 300,000 spectators lining the foreshores of Sydney Harbour, another two million watching on TV, and the constant buzz and whir of media helicopters overhead. 88 boats, from Australia, USA, UK, Germany, Sweden, Russia, Japan, Korea, China, oh and New Zealand, had lined up on three start lines.
Posted on 31 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart Race - More merriment on the airwaves
Here are more examples of merriment on the airwaves between the boats and Hobart Race Control So on December 29, 2016, after the River Derwent had let just three boats home (Perpetual Loyal, Giacomo and Scallywag, all inside the old race record, she went to sleep for a lot of the day. This made it frustrating for the sailors, some of whom saw the lighter side. So after seeing some of those in Dark & Stormy, here are more examples of merriment on the airwaves between the boats and HRC
Posted on 29 Dec 2016
Sydney Hobart Race-Dark and stormy, well because it is Dark and Stormy
Proving that there is a lighter side to the frustrations that is a race to Hobart Well it is now dark and the rain 'storms' have passed, but proving that there is a lighter side to the frustrations that is a race to Hobart, the custom Murray 37, Dark & Stormy had a wonderful exchange on the radio. Quite possibly it was co-owner and Navigator Terry Courts on the VHF in the super-frank exchange with Hobart Race Control at around 1928hrs on 29/12/16.
Posted on 29 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart Race - Wicked
ather and Son outfit, Wicked, are Matt and Mark Welsh from Melbourne. Matt is at home on the couch after knee surgery Father and Son outfit, Wicked, are Matt and Mark Welsh from Melbourne. Matt is at home on the couch after knee surgery, but Mark is out on the water, approaching Hobart. From on board he said, 'Amazing race. Barely any windward work. Just does not get better than this. Bit of gear damage cost us early, and we had to sail a little conservatively.'
Posted on 29 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart Race - Accepting the Challenge
When you buy a boat like the late Lou Abrahma's Sydney 38, Challenge, you're almost obliged to keep taking her South When you buy a boat like the late Lou Abrahma's Sydney 38, Challenge, you're almost obliged to keep taking her South at Christmas time. Luckily this has not been a problem for Chris Mrakas and his new crew, which includes Bruce Reidy
Posted on 29 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart Race – 67 out of 70
It's a pretty awesome score in anybody’s language. When it is the number of hours you spend under kite It's a pretty awesome score in anybody’s language. When it is the number of hours you spend under kite in the 72nd Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race so far, then it is more than A+++. Anto Sweetapple from on board the Jones 40, Quetzalcoatl, reports in from at sea for us.
Posted on 29 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart 2016 - The 60 Hour report card
60 hours into the 72nd Rolex Sydney Hobart race. 16 boats finished,five boats retired and 67 boats at sea. The state of play 60 hours into the 72nd running of the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race. At 0100hrs Australian Eastern Daylight Savings Time this morning, 16 boats had finished the 2016 race. Five boats had retired, and 67 boats were still on the water.
Posted on 28 Dec 2016
Rolex Sydney Hobart Race – the second step for CQS and 2017
It was a frustrating end to a frustrating race for the newest supermaxi in the 2016 Rolex Sydney to Hobart race It was a frustrating end to a frustrating race for the newest supermaxi to compete in the 2016 Rolex Sydney to Hobart race. It was just her second ever race, with her first, the White Island Race in New Zealand, producing a line honours win. While Ludde Ingvall’s radical new 98-footer CQS had a very slow passage across an almost windless Storm Bay and River Derwent.
Posted on 28 Dec 2016