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InSunSport - International - Tough

Product of the Week- Self-fit terminals

by Lee Mylchreest on 3 Jun 2012
Old technology, just updated .. .

There's many a cruising sailor who would rather do maintenance work on their boat themselves, partly to save money, partly for the satisfaction, and partly for the sheer pleasure of messing around on boats on a sunny day. Our product of the week, STA-LOK self-fit terminals, fits the bill perfectly for such sailors.

They are the easiest and most efficient way to terminate 1 x 19, 7 x 7, 7 x 19 and Dyform wire ropes, and can be hand fitted instead of machine swaged. They are not suitable for galvanised wire ropes, as rapid galvanic action will cause the wire rope to corrode and fail, or other wire constructions such as wire ropes with fibre cores.

They are manufactured from rustproof, high strength 316 stainless steel, 100% stronger than the wire and will work under constant load and variable shock loading.

They're also very simple to install with basic hand tools, and are available in imperial and metric wire sizes from 1/8' (3mm) to 1' (26mm) for right and left hand lay wire.

Best of all, they are reusable (with new wedge component) requiring no servicing, providing long life and low maintenance costs.

This might be a new design of wire rope terminal already used by professionals around the world, but it's really merely an update on an old piece of brilliance.

It was way back in 1973 that the company introduced a new design of wire rope terminal which so simplified the termination of wire rope that it became essential equipment for both the amateur and professional rigger.

Thirty years on, the STA-LOK self fit has gained world-wide recognition for high quality and total reliability.

The terminal consists of an assembly of four components, which can be fitted on site.

Fitting Instuctions:
Cut wire rope cleanly, free of protruding wires of different lengths, removing sharp edges.
Trade tip: use wire cutters or a fine tooth hacksaw, for best results.
Slide socket component (a) over wire
Un-lay outer strands in order to expose centre core.
Slide wedge component (b) over centre core (narrow end first)
Reposition outer strands evenly around the wedge Ensure that 1/8' (3mm) of the core protrudes from the end of the wedge. Take care, to ensure that a wire strand does not slip into slit of the wedge.
For 7 – strand ropes; ensure that each of the six outer strands lie in the gates provided.
Trade tip: push the socket towards end of wire, whilst repositioning outer strands
Note: If too much of the wire core protrudes from the end of the wedge, difficulty may be experienced later on in the assembly procedure.
Insert former component (c) in bottom of end fitting. Screw socket assembly into end fitting, tighten with spanners to terminate the wire. The force required should be no more than can be applied by one hand firmly. Undue force is not required as this may damage the threads.
The assembly is now complete.


Interior water proofing:
(This is not essential but will prevent water collecting in the bottom of the fitting.)
Unscrew the socket assembly from the end fitting.
Fill the end fitting approximately ¼ full with caulking, using boat life lifecaulk, 101 polysulfide or similar.
Re-assemble.
Remove excess caulking from the top of the fitting.

Don't forget that the STA-LOK Terminal is reusable however A NEW WEDGE MUST BE USED.

Need Help?:
If you require any assistance with technical assembly, please feel free to contact STA-LOK:

STA-LOK Terminals LTD (UK) Tel + 44 (0) 1206 391509 email: info@stalok.com
STA-LOK Terminals Inc (USA) Tel +1 910 399 5206 email: paul@stalokinc.com

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