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Mountain bike torch great for tough sailing conditions

by Des Ryan on 17 Sep 2013
Exposure torches - many advantages for the cruising sailor .. .
Cruising sailors benefit, not only from the research that goes into space science and high tech racing, but also from research into other markets. This was the case for Exposure Marine, which initially developed torches for the professional mountain bikers, and this led to producing torches which are incredibly powerful, superlight, and corrosion resistant, and therefore ideal for marine conditions.

Torches being such an important issue for cruising sailors on overnight journeys - for everything from finding the mooring to identifying a MOB, these compact light torches are worth considering. Here they are:

The X2, a 700 lumen buoyant marine search light, which is powerful enough to illuminate a man overboard, even though it is a compact 128mm long, and has output options in both white and red and at variable power settings.

The Pro 3, for ultimate function, which is a high power personal safety search light offering 975 lumens of white light. Both the X2 and the Pro 3 are buoyant.

Two ultracompact 48mm length torches, the XS and the XS-R (Red), which give high definition, low intensity light, designed to be worn around the neck for single hand operation.

Because of the lights’ intrinsic buoyancy they can be thrown into the water in a MOB situation to act as a locator beacon, and homing light for the person in the water. In addition they can be easily retrieved if they accidentally fall overboard.

'The Exposure torch range is perfectly suited to the core values of Ocean Safety’s product range offering,' comments Ocean Safety Managing Director, Charlie Mill. 'For us, as a man overboard light, these products are invaluable. The X2 and the Pro 3 will light up a person in the water, plus the area around them, facilitating rescue and recovery at night. They are a phenomenal help.'

Yet the torches are small enough for multiple uses, and are especially suitable for challenging situations where ultimate quality and functionality is required. Weight conscious skippers can get rid of heavy duty torches and spare batteries, underwater lights and strobes all in one go. Exposure’s torches cover all the bases from night time sail trimming to fixing things.

Recharging:
The Exposure rechargable torches can either be charged using a USB connection direct to an onboard computer or a 12v or 240v supply. A magnetic gold plated charging point prevents corrosion and makes the X2 and Pro 3 quick and easy to charge. Run times are over an hour on high beam and up to 70 hours on low red settings. The torches come in a rugged case with 12V charger. A good range of accessories include a belt holster, suction mount and stanchion mount.

Double-ended deck and nav torch, optimised for night vision:

Following the successful launch of these compact searchlights, Exposure Marine then developed the X1, a very lightweight double-ended torch, with three optimised night vision (‘ONV’) modes for on deck working, navigation and maintenance, without disturbing your fellow crew members.

Weighing just 86 grams and only 117 x 31mm, the compact little X1 is packed with the latest smart LED technology, drawn from Exposure’s pedigree mountain and road bike lights.

With a focus on both safety, the X1 has three white outputs; a 320 lumens high power search mode, an endurance working mode, and a low beam close range mode, with burn times of two, seven and twenty hours respectively.

The secondary 1.5 lumens red output, which is ideal for protecting your, and other crew members, night vision whilst working on deck, boasts impressive burn times of 24 hours on high beam, 36 hours on medium beam and 72 hours on low beam.

An integral white Strobe and SOS mode, in a waterproof IPX8 rated, buoyant, marine grade anodised casing, makes the X1 the must have personal safety torch to keep with you at all times.

If you can't find any of these at your local marine store, you can purchase them online by http://www.exposuremarine.com/!clicking_here.

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