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InSunSport - International - RG

Moths, Minis, OD and offshore—Sailing news from the U.S. and beyond

by David Schmidt, Sail-World USA Editor on 21 Oct 2013
Detroit, Michigan, USA’s Bora Gulari is the 2013 International Moth World Champion. Thierry Martinez
The 2013 Moth Worlds, which just concluded on Hawaii’s amazing Kaneohe Bay, proved to be an up-and-down affair. The ups, of course, involved the stunning scenery and the world-class competition, but the downs included numerous postponements and race cancellations due to a lack of consistent breeze. Still, the RC and the sailors worked hard to get in ten races, which saw 2009 Moth World Champion Bora Gulari (USA) earn back his crown, followed on the podium by Nathan Outteridge (AUS) and Scott Babbage (AUS).

'It hasn’t really set in yet,' reported Gulari. 'One thing I know for sure is that without Anthony [Katoun], George [Peet], Brad [Funk], and pretty much the entire U.S. Moth racing team, I would never be World Champion again.'



According to Gulari, a lot of his success this year was determined on his hometown waters of Detroit, Michigan, before even departing for Hawaii’s sunny and warm climes. 'We’ve been working for a solid year in Detroit, refining and changing things bit by bit until they’re perfect,' said Gulari about his boat, sails and equipment. 'I’ve never sailed with a faster sail since I bought my first Moth.'

Get the full 2013 Moth Worlds multi-media report, inside this issue.



Meanwhile, in Douarnenez, France, the 84 skippers who amassed to race in the fabled Mini Transat Race are still awaiting a favorable (read: safe) weather window to start the first leg of their adventure, which is set to take the fleet of 21-foot speedsters to Puerto Celero in the Canary Islands. 'It is super frustrating,' said 26-year-old Australian skipper Katrina Ham. 'Having visualized the start for years as motivation to get through the tough times, it's disappointing to have to wait.'

And in Olympic sailing circles, racing recently concluded at the ISAF Sailing World Cup Qingdao, where sailors were tested in a wide range of conditions, from full-on blustery at the beginning of the regatta to barely anything on the final day of competition.



'It was a stressful race but we're really happy,' said Juan de la Fuente, who, along with Lucas Calabrese, earned a Gold in the Men’s 470. 'Now we're trying to relax again. We came here looking for light winds and currents and we had it over the last four days so we're happy for that.'

More on the ISAF Sailing World Cup Qingdao, inside this issue.

And on Long Island Sound, strong northeasterly winds churned-up lumpy seas and made for some fairly extreme conditions at the Intercollegiate Offshore Regatta, especially for college sailors racing aboard borrowed keelboats. In order to keep everyone (and everything) safe, the RC made the wise decision to abandon racing, once it became clear that Mother Nature’s mood was not likely to relent.



'It was a shame for the teams that came so far,' said Regatta Chair Adam Loory. 'Our committee had to err on the side of caution; if boats get broken or people get hurt, we won’t be able to pull together a regatta on this scale ever again. As it was, the City Island UK Sailmakers loft burned a lot of midnight oil to get sails back into one piece for Sunday.' Get the full report, inside this issue.



Also inside, get the full story on the new course record for the Audi Hong Kong to Vietnam Race, don’t miss the coverage of US Sailing’s Annual Meeting Awards Dinner, and be sure to check out the reports from the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race.



And finally, don’t miss the great image galleries from Richard Gladwell and Peter Idoine of 'Team Australia' breaking the Sydney-Auckland record. Enjoy!

May the four winds blow you safely home,

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