Please select your home edition
Edition
Wildwind 2016 728x90

Marine Queensland explains importance of Australian Builders Plate

by Jeni Bone on 26 Oct 2012
MSQ Doug explains the rigours of testing Jeni Bone
Marine Queensland and MSQ hosted a day on the Gold Coast Broadwater for south-east Queensland marine media, demonstrating the series of tests recreational boats up to 6m go through to pass compliance to Australian Standards and emphasising the importance of the Australian Builders Plate to all manufacturers, dealers and buyers.

The workshop and on-water component aimed to assist boating journalists conducting boat tests to ensure they look beyond the PR spiel, understand what compliance encompasses and ask the right questions.

'This is a Marine Queensland and MSQ initiative to educate and inform industry to ensure vessels manufactured and sold in Queensland are compliant with Australian Standards – meaning the safest possible product for our customers,' said Don Jones, CEO of Marine Queensland.

The on-water testing of vessels included checking positioning of navigational lights, a swamp test, stability tests and at speed turn tests, showing journalists exactly what vessels go through to prove compliance.



The Australian Builders Plate is a joint initiative of industry and government through the National Marine Safety Committee. A national standard was developed following an extensive consultation process which included workshops and meetings around Australia with the Australian Marine Industries Federation, boating industry associations, boat builders, manufacturers and importers.

As Doug Matchett, Senior Naval Architect with MSQ explains: 'The ABP came about as a result of coroner’s inquests. In Queensland, data showed there were around 10 fatalities per annum – that’s five per 100,000 vessels.'

There are on average 80 deaths and nearly 1,000 people admitted to hospital each year as a result of boating incidents in Australia.



In Europe, manufacturers collaborate to a CE Mark under the European Recreational Craft Directive, without which it is nearly impossible to sell a boat, asserts Matchett. 'In the US, there’s the ABYC Standards and NMMA plate, all accepted by industry and the boating public.'

In 2006, the National Marine Safety Committee put together a regulatory impact statement for recreational vessels which highlighted that the primary vessels involved in fatalities were dinghies (57%), open motor boats and half cabins. Of these tragedies, 31% of the vessels were overpowered, 24% were overloaded and 12% of those less than six metres had inadequate stability or buoyancy.

At 36%, capsize was the most common initial event in all fatal incidences. The regulatory impact statement estimated that fatal and serious injuries associated with recreational boating costs Australians about A$52 million each year.

The Australian Builders Plate is a national initiative that aims to make boating safer by providing vital information about the capacity and capability of boats. It was formulated to ISO standards, currently AS1799 (2009).



The Australian Builders Plate requires boat builders, importers or competent persons (a person who has acquired through training, qualification, experience, or a combination of these, the knowledge and skills to enable that person to competently determine and approve the information on a builders plate) to determine boat-specific information and display it on the plate in a standard format.

The information that needs to be provided on an ABP includes:
• recommended maximum engine power rating and engine weight for outboard engines
• recommended maximum person capacity and maximum load
• buoyancy information, for vessels under six metres
• a warning statement about the alteration of the boat.

There are two types of builders plate, one for boats under six metres in length and another for boats six metres or more. The key difference is that vessels under six metres need to display buoyancy information, either basic or level flotation.

The information supplied on the plate will enable boat users to make more informed decisions when purchasing, as well as encouraging appropriate and responsible use of boats.

In the case of accidents, the bulk of which are caused by human error, investigators begin with making sure the boat was being operated in accordance with the details on the ABP, or check that it has one.

'If a boat is proven to be non-compliant, or misrepresented, the manufacturer, importer or seller may be culpable,' says Doug, adding that journalists can ask to check the ABP on any boats they trial 'and it should be clearly visible, at the helm, near the steering so the skipper is able to see it'.



ABP evolved from statistics gleaned from investigations and audits, as well as industry concerns manufacturers and importers would be liable for any incidents. Marine media proponents need to do their part to include ABP on their inventory of checks during a sea trial, and ensure their readers/viewers are aware of the role of the ABP and its aim to secure their safety on the water and once they sell their vessel.

More at http://www.nmsc.gov.au/recreational_boating/index.php?MID=24&CID=24

Zhik Yachting 660x82Colligo Marine 660x82Ancasta Ker 40+ 660x82

Related Articles

Dateline Rio - Sailing Olympics review - as good as it gets?
The Rio Sailing Olympics was widely judged to have been the best of recent times. The Rio Sailing Olympics was widely judged to have been the best of recent times. The weather was better than Weymouth and Qingdao, the courses more varied, but from a working media perspective, it was the people running the Rio regatta who really made the difference.
Posted on 26 Aug
Rio 2016 - Plain speaking by triple-medalist on Olympic sailing moves
Triple Olympic medalist, Santiago Lange has been on the sharp end of changes made to Olympic classes and formats Santiago Lange, a six-time Olympian and Bronze medallist in the 2004 and 2008 Olympics, won his third medal – Gold sailing in the Nacra 17 class. With that length of experience at an Olympic level, having sailed the Laser, Tornado and now Nacra 17 classes his comments on the future shape of the Olympic regatta was one of the highlights of the Medallists Media Conferences.
Posted on 25 Aug
An Q&A with Steve and Heidi Benjamin about the NYYC’s 2016 Queen’s Cup
Sail-World caught up with Steve and Heidi Benjamin to learn more about Heidi’s historic win in the NYYC’s Queen’s Cup. When it comes to U.S. Grand Prix sailing, it’s hard not to encounter the names of Steve and Heidi Benjamin. The two highly polished sailors have been successfully campaigning their series of yachts, named SPOOKIE, for years, starting first with a Carkeek 40 and progressing to their TP52. I caught up with Steve and Heidi to learn more about Heidi’s historic win in the NYYC’s Queen’s Cup
Posted on 19 Aug
Rio 2016 - Images of the penultimate race in the Finns - Scott wins
Sail-World's Richard Gladwell was on the water for the final race of the Qualifying Series of the Mens Finn Sail-World's Richard Gladwell was on the water for the final race of the Qualifying Series of the Mens Finn, in what potentially could have been Giles Scott's (GBR) Gold medal winning race. In the end, the current world champion won in style.
Posted on 15 Aug
Rio 2016 - Images from the Mens RS:X Medal Race
Sail-World's NZ Editor, Richard Gladwell, was on the water at the Medal Race for the RS:X class Sail-World's NZ Editor, Richard Gladwell, was on the water at the Medal Race for the RS:X class won before the race by Dorian van Rijsselberghe (NED) without needing points from the Medal Race. Nick Dempsey (GBR) was second on a similar basis.
Posted on 15 Aug
Rio 2016 - Sailors talk of Life at the Extreme on the Atlantic Ocean
Certainly the Volvo Ocean Race catchcry of Life at the Extreme is not a phrase associated with the Sailing Olympics. The 470 crews were suffering the mixed emotions of survival of an extreme test by nature, the cold, and for some elation at their placings, after Thursday's battle for survival. In conditions that looked more out of the Volvo Ocean Race, than an Olympic sailing regatta, crews battled 20kt plus winds and Atlantic Ocean rollers that towered up to four metres.
Posted on 13 Aug
Rio Olympics - Fourth gallery of images the fearsome Niteroi course
Fourth image gallery from racing on Day 4 in the Mens and Womens 470 class on the Niteroi course in the Atlantic Ocean Fourth image gallery from racing on Day 4 in the Mens and Womens 470 class on the Niteroi course in the Atlantic Ocean - sailing in 3-4 metre swells and 20kt plus winds. believe it or not the sea conditions were worse inshore as the fleet encountered the backwashed Atlantic rollers
Posted on 12 Aug
Rio 2016 - Third image gallery of 470's braving the Atlantic Ocean
Third image gallery from racing on Day 4 in the Mens and Womens 470 class on the Niteroi course in the Atlantic Ocean Third image gallery from racing on Day 4 in the Mens and Womens 470 class on the Niteroi course in the Atlantic Ocean - sailing in 3-4 metre swells and 20kt plus winds
Posted on 12 Aug
Gladwell's Line - The challenges of Guanbara Bay
The decision to run Medal Racing on the Pao de Acucer course, probably won't be remembered as one of the brightest The decision to run Medal Racing on the Pao de Acucer, probably won't be remembered as one of the brightest of the 2016 Sailing Olympics. Over shadowed by a 1300ft tall granite and quartz mountain in the shape of a sugarloaf, the bay suffers from dramatic windshifts, and huge variance in wind pressure.
Posted on 11 Aug
Rio 2016 - Fresher breezes expected inside and outside on Day 3
Stronger winds are expected for the third day of racing in the 2016 Olympic Sailing Regatta in Rio de Janeiro. Stronger winds are expected for the third day of racing in the 2016 Olympic Sailing Regatta in Rio de Janeiro. Two of the fleet scheduled to race outside on the Atlantic Ocean course off Copacabana Beach, while the 470 Men and Women will race inside on Guananara Bay.
Posted on 10 Aug