Please select your home edition
Edition
KZRaceFurlers

London Olympics 2012- Slingsby slogs - Goodison lifts

by Rob Kothe and the Sail-World Team on 2 Aug 2012
Laser sailor, Paul Goodison in the Men’s One Person Dinghy (Laser) event in The London 2012 Olympic Sailing Competition. onEdition © http://www.onEdition.com
The five times Laser World Champion Australia’s Tom Slingsby slipped back into second place, behind Pavlos Kontides from Cyprus after six races of the London 2012 Olympic Sailing Competition in Weymouth, England.

In the first race this morning, sailed in a 12-14 knot southerly, Slingsby was 10th at the top mark and surged down the run into second place behind Tonci Stipanovic. He held that place until the finish, with Kontides fourth behind him.
The second race was sailed in a breeze building from 12-17 knots, and it was another ordinary start from the Australian. He was 18th at the top mark, 22nd mid-race before climbing back to ninth place at the finish. Kontides finished second behind Andrew Murdoch (NZL).

Ashore, Tom Slingsby said ‘A long day on the water again and it was hard work. I am getting sick of trying to do these comebacks, I just want to get good starts and to lead to every mark would be the goal.

‘I am sailing well but Kontides has just found another gear at the moment. We still have another couple of days. He is a risk taker and he took some risks today and they paid off again. I saw him out to the left in the last race and I was thinking he looks like he is buried there and he led to the top mark. He just keeps getting it right.

‘It was frustrating today. I got rolled today by Denmark and Tunisia, all these guys I usually have a speed edge over. I don't know whether it’s my setup, but sometimes I don't quite have the speed I want and these guys take advantage of it and I keep getting put back in the fleet. I have got to fix some things and make sure I get off the line to the top mark in good shape.

‘Today in the first race when I was back in the pack, I just thought of yesterday and I thought ‘let’s start the process again and start coming back’ and I didn't do it quite as well today as I did yesterday. If I sail well I can pull back (up).’


Behind Kontides and Slingsby are Stipanovic, Rasmus Mygren (SWE), Juan Ignacio Maegli Aguero (GUA) and then, in sixth place, is the Beijing Laser Gold Medallist Paul Goodison (GBR).

Goodison is fighting a back injury as he explained today.

‘I am feeling a lot better than I was obviously this time yesterday. The physio did an amazing job last night of putting me back together. It was kind of an hour lying on my bed and then go see the physio then an hour lying on my bed and see the physio.

‘The doctor gave me some pretty amazing tablets last night which made me sleep. I woke up almost a little bit hung over this morning. That seemed to take away most of the pain. Today on the water, although I didn't feel 100% physically right, my mind was more focussed on the decision making more than it was on the pain and although I didn't feel like I was that fast upwind I still could make the decisions to give me a bit of a chance to attack downwind and I guess that's what I needed to do hopefully. Tomorrow is a rest day so I can piece myself back together and get closer to 100% so that in the second half of the regatta I can fire on all cylinders and see what comes out of this.
‘It‘s really tricky conditions out there and I guess you have seen watching how quick we gained in that first race, right out at the front. There was a left shift at the top that I slipped up on. In the second one I thought I was going to get out on the right quite nicely with the wind but it didn't go my way. It was pretty character building stuff. I am pretty happy with both races.

‘When I am just sitting it is fine. It is as soon as I start moving around and bouncing around that I am loading up the back, there’s obviously a nerve in there that every time I bounce it fires and it is quite intense pain. Once that goes it is not so bad. It is fine in the lighter stuff but as soon as it gets choppy and windy when you have got to throw yourself around a lot more, that's when the problems occur.

‘My priority right now is to get better as quickly as I can tomorrow and come out of the other side of the regatta 100%. There are a lot of talented sailors out there and I think I have done a good job hanging in there as best as I could, so I have to try and attack in the second half of the regatta. If I have a chance at fighting for podium that is fantastic. I am going to keep fighting and do the best I can.

‘I think if it were any other regatta I would be flat out on the sofa and watching it on TV. You only get one chance at this every four years and if it means I am in a lot of pain then so be it. You only get the one shot and I want to give it my all. I have got to do that to be happy with myself.’

Stay tuned!

North Technology - Southern SparsPredictWind.com 2014Naiad/Oracle Supplier

Related Articles

JATO ignited as SuperFoiler prepares for take off (Pt I)
When small military transports have to take off from impossibly short runways with a belly full of cargo When small military transports have to take off from impossibly short runways with a belly full of cargo akin to Mr. Creosote, they reach for the JATO bottles. Aircraft like C-7 Caribous and LC130 Hercules strap rockets, yes rockets, to the underside of their wings to gain valuable extra thrust, which surely helps keep the pilots' heart rates below the red line.
Posted today at 4:45 am
Discussing the Storm Trysail Club’s Ted Hood Regatta with Clarke Smith
I chatted with Clarke Smith, chairman for the 2017 Ted Hood Regatta, via email, to learn more about this exciting event. Given the late, great Ted Hood’s sterling reputation as both a sailor and innovator, it makes a lot of sense that the Storm Trysail Club’s Marblehead Station would create their inaugural Ted Hood Regatta (August 25-27), which will be held on the waters off of Marblehead, Massachusetts, in his honor. I corresponded with Clarke Smith, chairman for the 2017 Ted Hood Regatta, via email, to learn more.
Posted on 21 Aug
An interview with Patrick Kennedy about the Ida Lewis Distance Race
I interviewed Patrick Kennedy, chair of the 2017 ILDR, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution. With this year’s Ida Lewis Distance Race set to unfurl the weekend of August 18-20, I caught up with Patrick Kennedy, chair of the 2017 ILDR, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the event’s new partnership with the 2017 J/Fest New England.
Posted on 14 Aug
An interview with Marianne Davis about the CORK International Regatta
I interviewed Marianne Davis, co-chair of the CORK International Regatta, to learn about the regatta’s state of affairs. While the various CORK regattas' registration lists include international sailors, these events are some of the gemstones in Sail Canada’s yearly championship calendar, making them of extra importance to Canadian sailors. I recently caught up with Marianne Davis, co-chair of the 2017 event, via email, to learn more about the CORK International Regatta’s evolution and its current state of affairs.
Posted on 7 Aug
A Q&A with the RORC’s Nick Elliott about the 2017 Rolex Fastnet Race
I caught up with Nick Elliott, RORC Racing Manager, via email, to learn more about the world-famous Rolex Fastnet Race. When one stops to consider the world’s best ocean races, the Royal Offshore Racing Club’s Rolex Fastnet Race, which starts on Sunday, August 6, 2017, is never far from mind. I caught up with Nick Elliott, RORC Racing Manager, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the amount of work that goes into pulling off this world-famous regatta.
Posted on 1 Aug
Ian Walker - Musto Ambassador on the Volvo Ocean Race, America's Cup
Ian Walker on his Volvo Ocean Race win, why food and clothing are so important offshore, his views on the America's Cup We speak to Musto ambassador Ian Walker about his Volvo Ocean Race win, why food and clothing are so important offshore, his views on the America's Cup, his new desk job, sailing for fun, and 20 years of the John Merricks Sailing Trust.
Posted on 23 Jul
Black Jack Yachting. Bigger boat. Bigger team. Even bigger performance
Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus. Some were sail makers, like Skipper Mark Bradford and also Vaughan Prentice from North Sails’ Brisbane loft. Others were riggers, such as Bruce Clarke, and there are even boat builders, like Gary van Lunteren, as well as Ash Deeks.
Posted on 20 Jul
A Q&A with Tom Trujillo about the Transpacific Race’s 49th running
Sail-World interviewed Tom Trujillo, the Transpac Race’s PRO, via email to learn more about this classic bluewater race. The Transpac Race (est 1906) is in a rarefied group of four races that are considered sailing’s greatest bluewater Corinthian challenges, and it welcomes a wildly diverse fleet of bluewater-worthy boats. The 49th running of this classic race is currently underway, so Sail-World caught up with Tom Trujillo, the race’s principal race officer, via email to learn more.
Posted on 7 Jul
Gladwell's Line - America's Cup returns to its new home and thinking
Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness and will open a new era of America's Cup, New Zealand and World Sailing. A rookie crew won the most prestigious trophy in sailing, and one of the most difficult to win in any sport.
Posted on 29 Jun
SuperFoilers Are Go!
SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets in the great scheme of things, they come together in the one form as harmoniously as a Rolls Royce, and also deliver intense energy way past the sum of their parts, just like some amazing band.
Posted on 28 Jun