Please select your home edition
Edition
InSunSport - International - Endure

London Olympics 2012- Sailing Olympics News - Day 11

by . on 9 Aug 2012
Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen (AUS) after their Gold Medal presentation for the 49er © Richard Gladwell www.richardgladwell.com
Welcome to Sail-World.com's 2012 Olympic Newsletter for Day 11

Today was a day of controversy at Weymouth.

The major surprise was that the USA, was going home without winning a single medal.

It was their worst sailing Olympics result since 1936 in Berlin – when they sailed classes to the Metre rule, plus the Star was enjoying its third Olympics.

What happens from here, will be watched with great interest.

Several of the powerhouses of sailing have been in the current position of US Sailing. The prescription for recovery is largely the same – work out what the key points are in the successful nations, and then adapt and apply.

That is not easy and involves lifting standards. Many countries will not send competitors who are not in the top ten in the world – that is not top-ten capable but top ten achieving.


That also involves addressing the conflict between Olympism and Winning. If The US wants to give sailors and Olympic experience, then please continue - but don’t be too bothered about the results.

In this edition, outgoing US Olympic Chairman Dean Brenner offers his thoughts.


Another controversy occurred in the Womens Double Hander (470) when the New Zealand crew who had scored a 1,1,2 score-line in their last three races, came unstuck in he tenth race and finished 18th

That is sufficient for them to be tied on points for the lead going into the Medal race on Friday – meaning it will be a Match Race.

There was controversy as the USA was eliminated from the Womens Match Racing. While Anna Tunnicliffe had been struggling to get on top of the field at this regatta, the 2008 Olympic Gold Medalist is a tough nut, and most expected to see her there at the end.


Tomorrow, the Mens 470 sails its Medal Race that will be a battle of two fronts. As with the 49ers today the first two places are decided, but only four points separate the points table leader, Australia from the second placed crew, Great Britain. Then it is a two-way contest, or if things get a little stretched, mathematically a third crew can come through.

It will be interesting to see the strategies adopted by the various crews, and how those are put into effect.


In this edition of Sail-World’s Olympic newsletter we have all the background and reports on today's racing, including the two Medal Races, along with some great images from some of the world’s top photographers.

We’ll all be back in action tomorrow – stay tuned to www.sail-world.com

Good sailing!

Richard Gladwell
Olympic Editor

Zhik Dinghy 660x82Naiad/Oracle SupplierWildwind 2016 660x82

Related Articles

Foiling into the Windy City
. .
Posted on 10 Jun
Foiling into the Windy City
. .
Posted on 10 Jun
Australia and Britain - The best of rivals or the best of partners?
There has always been a strong rivalry between Aussies and Poms, with of course the Ashes being the pinnacle of it all. There has always been a strong rivalry between Aussies and Poms in sport, with of course the Ashes being the pinnacle of it all. In the International Moth World Championship there is an Ashes trophy and, for the first time in a long while, the Brits took the trophy home.
Posted on 31 May
Practice makes perfect?
There are a lot of us who try to get out on the water whenever we can. There are a lot of us who try to get out on the water whenever we can - be it a club race, a weekend open or a championship. The general feeling is that the more we sail, the better we get, but is that actually the case?
Posted on 27 May
Practice makes perfect?
There are a lot of us who try to get out on the water whenever we can. There are a lot of us who try to get out on the water whenever we can - be it a club race, a weekend open or a championship. The general feeling is that the more we sail, the better we get, but is that actually the case?
Posted on 27 May
Races, Regattas and Disruptive Technology
x In the olden days, the major cost of attending a regatta for yacht owners and crew was the accommodation and still is. Of course for cruising yachties, traditionally the crew stays on boat, during regatta week, because after all it is replete with dishwasher, washing machine, a good cellar and an oven in which you could cook a roast. For racing boat owners or dinghy owners, life was not so easy.
Posted on 19 Apr
Children of the Internet, Rio and Hong Kong
x x
Posted on 13 Apr
World Sailing Cup - Ahead a Dead Rat in a Shoe v3 or Spring Daffodils
While a host of major sailing events go from strength to strength, the Sailing World Cup has very major issues. Last night my Irish better half was sitting beside me on the sofa watching an Australian version of the popular TV Cooking Program My Kitchen Rules on a tablet with her headphone while I was watching Diehard II for the seventeenth time (it’s a boy thing) on TV. She suddenly spluttered and laughed, took off her headphones and motioned for me to mute Diehard. (Seriously!!)
Posted on 7 Apr
World's most popular boat revisited and big news from Volvo Ocean Race
x x
Posted on 1 Apr
World's most popular boat revisited and big news from Volvo Ocean Race
x x
Posted on 1 Apr