Please select your home edition
Edition
PredictWind.com 2014

London Olympics 2012—Overview of the Women’s Match Racing medal race

by David Schmidt, Sail-World USA Editor on 11 Aug 2012
Olivia Price, Nina Curtis and Lucinda Whitty (AUS), aka the "Speedy Sheilas" competing in the Women’s Match Racing event at the London Olympic 2012 onEdition © http://www.onEdition.com
Count on today to be a fascinating day of sailing here at the Weymouth and Portland Sailing Academy, situated in here in Portland, UK. While almost all of sailing’s medal ceremonies have now concluded, the Women’s Match Racing (WMR) event’s Gold and Silver medal races are scheduled to take place today on the spectator-friendly Nothe course in a best-of-three showdown between the 'Speedy Sheilas' (AUS) and the also-quick Spanish-flagged team. The petite finals, which will determine Bronze and fourth-place, is also set to take place on the Nothe, making for a brilliant day of match sailing.

While the wind Gods have been borderline absent for the past two days, they have graced the final day of sailboat racing in the XXX Olympiad with the best breeze of the entire event. Currently, the wind is streaming from the east at 18-20 knots, but gusts are expected to punch-up to 28 knots by this afternoon. This is a huge change from the prevailing south-southwesterly winds that we have experienced for the majority of this event.

Interestingly, this new wind direction and higher speeds will also translate to three-plus foot (one meter) seas on the normally sheltered Nothe course. This will no doubt test each team’s nerve in both stronger air and lumpy seas—conditions that the WMR class has not encountered to date here in Weymouth.

First up are the petite finals, which are being contested between the WMR teams from Finland and Russia. The winner of this series will claim Bronze, while the loser will have to settle for 'leather'. These races are slated to commence at 1200 hours, local time, and will be rifled-off in short order.

Once the Bronze and 'leather' places have been determined, the medal races will start unfurling, starting at 1330 hours. Each successive race will start 30 minutes after the first starting guns sounds, so the Gold and Silver medals will be determined by 1430 hours.


It will be fascinating to see if Olivia Price and her crew of Nina Curtis and Lucinda Whitty (aka, the 'Speedy Sheilas') can defeat their Spanish-flagged rivals (Tamara Dominguez, Sofia Puga and Angela Menendez). Both teams have entered today’s medal race with nearly impeccable records, so expect some of the best racing of the entire Olympiad. Game on!

Please stand by for more news, quotes from the winning sailors and great photo-galleries, as the day unfurls.

Zhik AkzoNobelb 660x82KZRaceFurlersProtector - 660 x 82

Related Articles

Black Jack Yachting. Bigger boat. Bigger team. Even bigger performance
Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus Throughout the iterations of maxis called Black Jack, a strong, consistent and talented team has been their focus. Some were sail makers, like Skipper Mark Bradford and also Vaughan Prentice from North Sails’ Brisbane loft. Others were riggers, such as Bruce Clarke, and there are even boat builders, like Gary van Lunteren, as well as Ash Deeks.
Posted today at 5:40 am
A Q&A with Tom Trujillo about the Transpacific Race’s 49th running
Sail-World interviewed Tom Trujillo, the Transpac Race’s PRO, via email to learn more about this classic bluewater race. The Transpac Race (est 1906) is in a rarefied group of four races that are considered sailing’s greatest bluewater Corinthian challenges, and it welcomes a wildly diverse fleet of bluewater-worthy boats. The 49th running of this classic race is currently underway, so Sail-World caught up with Tom Trujillo, the race’s principal race officer, via email to learn more.
Posted on 7 Jul
Gladwell's Line - America's Cup returns to its new home and thinking
Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness Emirates Team New Zealand's win in the 35th America's Cup ends 17-years of wandering in the AC wilderness and will open a new era of America's Cup, New Zealand and World Sailing. A rookie crew won the most prestigious trophy in sailing, and one of the most difficult to win in any sport.
Posted on 29 Jun
SuperFoilers Are Go!
SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets SuperFoilers represent many things. Whilst those components are disparate and virtually from different planets in the great scheme of things, they come together in the one form as harmoniously as a Rolls Royce, and also deliver intense energy way past the sum of their parts, just like some amazing band.
Posted on 28 Jun
A Q&A with Kimball Livingston about San Francisco high school sailing
I emailed with my friend and colleague Kimball Livingtston to learn about San Francisco’s latest sailing revolution. I started hearing whispers of shifts in the San Francisco Bay high school sailing scene a couple of months ago. A few inquiries led me to my good friend and colleague Kimball Livingston, a world-class sailor, scribe, and StFYC staff commodore who isn’t one to keep his seaboots dry when the topic turns to opportunities for the next sailing generation. I caught up with KL via email to learn more.
Posted on 13 Jun
A Q&A with Andrew Howe about winning the 2015 Marion to Bermuda Race
I interviewed Andrew Howe, the 2015 Marion to Bermuda Race’s winning co-navigator, to learn more about their race. In 2015, skipper Greg Marston and the crew of Ti, a 1967 Alden Mistral, racing under celestial rules, were the overall winners of the Marion Bermuda Race Founders Division, beating boats that were enjoying GPS accuracy. On the eve of the 2017 edition of the race, I reached out to Andrew Howe, the team’s co-navigator, to gain perspective on this impressive win and hear about his 2017 plans.
Posted on 7 Jun
An interview with Allan McLean about the 2017 Marion to Bermuda Race
I interviewed Allan McLean, the Marion to Bermuda Race’s executive director, to learn more about this biennial event. The 2017 Marion to Bermuda Race is set to kick off on Friday, June 9, so I caught up with Allan McLean, the race’s executive director, via email to learn more about the race’s history and evolution, its challenges, and the special America’s Cup experience that awaits Marion to Bermuda sailors upon reaching the Onion Patch.
Posted on 5 Jun
An interview with Ray Redniss about the STC’s annual Block Island Race
I caught up with Ray Redniss, the Block Island Race’s longtime PRO, via email to learn more about this classic event. I caught up with Ray Redniss, who has served as the PRO for the Block Island Race and the Vineyard Race (September 1, 2017) for the past twenty-plus years, via email to learn more about the state of this classic, early season New England event.
Posted on 22 May
An Q&A with Jeremy Pochman about 11th Hour Racing’s impressive efforts
I interviewed Jeremy Pochman of 11th Hour Racing to learn more about this forward-thinking environmental non-profit. 11th Hour Racing is doing some of the most forward-leaning environmental work in the entire marine sphere, and I wanted to learn more, so I reached out to Jeremy Pochman, 11th Hour Racing’s Strategic Director and Co-founder, to ask a few questions. All sailors are strongly encouraged to give this interview the time it deserves.
Posted on 15 May
A Q&A with Don Adams about Sail Canada’s plan to win Olympic medals
I caught up with Sail Canada CEO Don Adams to hear about Team Canada’s High Performance Plan for winning Olympic medals. Sail Canada, Canada’s national sailing authority, is implementing a new High Performance Plan with the aim of improving on their recent Olympic sailing performances. I caught up with Don Adams, CEO of Sail Canada, to learn more about this ambition plan for helping Canadian sailors win Olympic medals while also helping to inspire younger generations to pursue the Olympic-sailing dream.
Posted on 8 May