Please select your home edition
Edition
Marine Resource 2016

Coral Triangle Initiative - Safeguarding food security

by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies on 11 Jul 2012
.
Coral Triangle Initiative - Safeguarding food security in the Coral Triangle, the region embracing six nations and 350 million people to Australia’s north, is a key focus at an international meeting in Cairns today.

The meeting of the Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) countries, hosted by the Asian Development Bank and Australia, reports on the progress of an international effort to protect the world epicenter of marine biodiversity and the food that it supplies to the region.

The six nations of the Coral Triangle – Indonesia, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Timor Leste, Papua New Guinea and Malaysia – meet amid warnings that seafood supplies for the region’s growing population could become critical if the balance between commercial fishing, conservation and the needs of local fishers is not managed carefully.

Founded by the six countries in 2009, the Coral Triangle Initiative covers 5.7m square kilometres of oceans and coast in southeastern Asia. The region is facing mounting pressure as demand for fish soars and commercial pressures rise, while coral reefs decline and local communities struggle to earn their livelihoods from the sea.

The CTI’s ambitious plan for the future includes:
• Developing an ecosystem approach to fisheries management
• Building a network of Marine Protected Areas across the region
• Developing measures to help local people adapt to climate change
• Protecting threatened marine species.

Professor Bob Pressey of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) at James Cook University says that marine conservation approaches adopted in developed countries like Australia and the United States will need re-thinking if they are to work in the Coral Triangle, where so many livelihoods depend on the sea.

'Sure, you can show there are benefits to the fish catch if you put in some no-take areas – but the CTI plan also has a focus on issues like resilience to climate change and biodiversity conservation. These additional goals will almost certainly need more areas to be set aside from fishing than needed only to sustain livelihoods. So achieving these higher-level goals will need to be handled with great care to avoid adding to the pressures on the affected people.'

'Incentives and alternative employment need to be created if fishers are to be encouraged to reduce their catches', he says. Also government and large-scale conservation plans need somehow to come to terms with the complexity of local fishing rights and ownership of the sea. 'We still have a lot to learn about how to do this,' he adds.

Research by Dr Simon Foale of COECRS and James Cook University, and colleagues, suggests the food security of the region could be at risk due to soaring demand (both local and international), a decline in stocks of wild fisheries, and degradation of coastal and marine ecosystems.

'Besides the local population of 350 million, major economies like Japan, China and South Korea now depend on imports of fish from the Coral Triangle countries,' he says.

'The Philippines is already experiencing huge external pressures from China and other neighbouring countries, and we are seeing the start of this in hitherto-untouched regions like parts of Papua New Guinea,' adds Prof. Pressey.

Dr Foale warns that one of the first consequences of this confluence of pressures is that the price of fish will become unaffordable for the majority of local people throughout the CTI region. 'Urbanisation is increasing, leading to growing demand for fish at a time when marine resources are already overstretched,' he says, adding that groups which are economically and politically marginalised will suffer most.

'One of the challenges with big-scale conservation planning is to take account of issues like poverty and its causes. We need to focus more on how you create – and pay for – alternative livelihoods for people who could lose out when fisheries are closed or scaled back.

Dr Foale concludes that the Coral Triangle Initiative will succeed if it includes:
• Stronger food security goals
• Balanced, flexible introduction of MPAs
• Alternative livelihoods and fish production methods
• Careful management of industrial fishing fleets
• A stronger focus on the drivers of poverty and underdevelopment in CT countries, especially capital flight.

He adds that the CTI is a bold and exciting initiative. Aquaculture of both fish and sea plants could offer a viable alternative source of incomes for many communities affected by closure of fishing ARC Centre of Excellent for Coral Reef Studies website
upffront 660x82Newport Boat Show 2016 660x82Colligo Marine 660x82

Related Articles

Rio official murdered ten months before the Olympics
Rio de Janeiro is a troubled city and a reeling Olympic host, but it will always have beautiful Guanabara Bay. Does an unsolved murder of an official in Rio in charge of cleaning up Guanabara Bay say a lot about the state of platy in the magical city? Priscilla Pereira was murdered 10 months ago and the thinking is that she was murdered in relation to her work
Posted on 31 Jul
WHO statement on Zika virus
The third meeting of the EC convened by the Director-General under IHR 2005 regarding microcephaly and Zika virus The third meeting of the Emergency Committee (EC) convened by the Director-General under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR 2005) regarding microcephaly, other neurological disorders and Zika virus was held by teleconference on 14 June 2016, from 13:00 to 17:15 Central European Time.
Posted on 16 Jun
Atlantic Cup 2016 - a race with an environmental commitment
The Atlantic Cup continues to further its mission for the 2016 race by examining the global economic impact of the ocean The Atlantic Cup continues to further its mission for the 2016 race by examining the global economic impact of the ocean and how an unhealthy ocean can affect the economy.
Posted on 7 Apr
Zika virus situation report
From 1 January 2007 to 16 March 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 59 countries and territories. From 1 January 2007 to 16 March 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 59 countries and territories. Cuba and Dominica are the latest to report autochthonous (local) transmission of Zika virus on 14 and 15 March, respectively. Five of these countries and territories reported a Zika virus outbreak that is now over.
Posted on 2 Apr
Have Norway scientists solved the Bermuda Triangle mystery?
The Bermuda Triangle has been said to have claimed numerous ships and aircraft over the years The Bermuda Triangle has been said to have claimed numerous ships and aircraft over the years, and everything from aliens to remnants from the lost island of Atlantis have been fingered as the culprits.
Posted on 15 Mar
Cyclone Winston Relief Fund – Help the people of Fiji
Sea Mercy is sending volunteer fleet of small and large vessels, loaded with shelter, food and medical supplies to Fiji. Sea Mercy is once again sending our volunteer fleet of small and large vessels, loaded with shelter, food, water and medical supplies and teams to Fiji.
Posted on 27 Feb
Flying Scot Atlantic Coast Champs - Hanson Medals awarded for rescues
US Sailing Safety at Sea Committee awarded the Arthur B. Hanson Rescue Medals to eight boats for their heroic efforts The US Sailing Safety at Sea Committee awarded the Arthur B. Hanson Rescue Medals to eight boats for their heroic efforts when a microburst storm hit the 2015 Flying Scot Atlantic Coast Championship, hosted by the Blackbeard Sailing Club, in New Bern, NC on September 12.
Posted on 2 Feb
Eco-warriors Sea-Bin crowd sharing critical stage with nine days to go
The automated marina cleaning SeaBin project has raised 86% of their target with 9 days left. The automated marina cleaning SeaBin project has raised $198,020 of $230,000.00 with nine days left on their Indiegogo crowdfunding platform, but they need more help now.
Posted on 29 Dec 2015
Higher levels of Fukushima Cesium detected offshore
Scientists monitoring the spread of radiation in the ocean from the Fukushima nuclear accident report Scientists monitoring the spread of radiation in the ocean from the Fukushima nuclear accident report finding an increased number of sites off the US West Coast showing signs of contamination from Fukushima. This includes the highest detected level to date from a sample collected about 1,600 miles west of San Francisco.
Posted on 6 Dec 2015
Don’t be a Tosser – Not your usual environmental article!!
The word ‘Tosser’ in the Oxford English dictionary means – ‘a person or thing that throws something’. The word ‘Tosser’ in the Oxford English dictionary means – ‘a person or thing that throws something’. There is no need for me to tell you the other meaning that is commonly used around the world. However in this article it will refer to both at the same time as someone who tosses trash into the ocean, truly is a tosser.
Posted on 3 Dec 2015