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Coastguard Boating Education- ICC now available to NZ Citizens

by Coastguard Boating Education on 6 Apr 2011
Image of ICC(watermark-large) Coastguard Boating Education http://www.cbes.org.nz/

The International Certificate for Operators of Pleasure Craft (known as an ICC) is now available to New Zealand citizens (before March 1st 2011 ICCs were only available to UK citizens or residents).

ICCs are awarded following a short practical and knowledge assessment through an RYA Training Centre. CEVNI tests can be completed in hard copy or on-line. ICCs are available in a number of different vessel categories (sail and/or power) up to 24 metres for coastal or inland waters. An additional CEVNI endorsement is also available, covering signs, rules and procedures for European inland waterways.

The ICC is of United Nations (UN) origin and is regulated through the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNEC) Inland Transport Committee. Resolution 40 authorises the issue of ICCs by the RYA, through the international network of RYA Training Centres.

Which countries require or accept an ICC?

22 of the 56 UNEC member nations have formally applied Resolution 40 (though some with various caveats). These should formally accept an ICC, namely: Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom. In practice however, many local police, harbour masters and other local authorities know of and accept an ICC as sufficient proof of competence even when there is no legal obligation for them to do so. The holder’s photograph and official wording translated into nine different languages on the certificate assist with its wide acceptance. CBES/RYA however make no guarantee that an ICC will be accepted by a particular nation or individual official. Travellers are recommended to gain clarification in writing regarding what certification is required in advance.

How do I get an ICC and how much does it cost?

ICCs are issued following an assessment at an RYA Training Centre – listed at www.cbes.org.nz/rya/ contact a training centre appropriate to the type of ICC you require (power or sail). Training Centres will charge for their time to conduct the assessment, and any training you may require beforehand. ICCs incur a admin/processing/certificate fee of $80.00 – payable to CBES.

Further Information

For further information contact the team at CBES: 09 361 4700 / 0800 40 80 90 / info@cbes.org.nz or visit the RYA ICC info web page at: www.rya.org.uk/infoadvice/boatingabroad/icc/Pages/icc.aspx
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