Please select your home edition
Edition
Naiad/Oracle Supplier

Block Island Race at Storm Trysail Club preview

by Storm Trysail Club on 23 May 2013
George David’s (Hartford, Conn.) 90’ Reichel/Pugh design Rambler will compete for its seventh time in a row - Block Island Race 2013 Storm Trysail Club
The 68th Block Island Race was ushered in with snow and rain, a messy spring in the Northeast looks to be giving way to more acceptable conditions for Memorial Day Weekend. Scheduled to start Friday, May 24 at 1400, the 186 nautical mile race (from Stamford, Conn., down Long Island Sound, around Block Island, R.I. and back to Stamford) is an annual rite of passage for sailors from New York and New England and is notorious for a 'fork in the road' decision that must be made upon leaving and returning to Long Island Sound.

'The natural obstruction of Plum Island, which lies about 60 miles off the start, forces navigators to decide whether to take the passage of Plum Gut or The Race (or in some rare instances, Fishers Island Sound), and the decision often determines the outcome of the race,' said Event Chair Ray Redniss. He added that Long Island Sound, an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean, is situated between Connecticut to the north and Long Island, New York to the south and that with eight million people living within its watershed, it’s no wonder that the Connecticut cities of Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, Southport and Stamford as well as the New York cities of Bay Shore, Brooklyn, Larchmont and New York City are well represented by the 63 boats signed up, thus far, in six IRC and two PHRF classes as well as a one-design class for J/109s.
The largest boat in the fleet will be George David’s (Hartford, Conn.) 90’ Reichel/Pugh design Rambler, which took line honors last year and will be sailing in the event for the seventh time in a row. 'We have won it twice on corrected time overall and have broken the course record once,' said Rambler’s Project Manager Mick Harvey, adding that the race is extremely challenging for a number of reasons. 'Firstly it is very early in the season, late spring really, so the race is subject to cooler seawater temperature and relatively fast passage of weather systems across the course. The land mass in Connecticut is relatively cool this time of the year; however, in the right weather conditions, it can become quite warm during daylight hours. You can have situations where there are two sea breezes fighting each other, one on the Connecticut shore and one on the Long Island shore.'

Harvey also mentioned the 'big tidal features' at Plum Gut and The Race as contributing to an 'interesting, tricky race.'
'Every time we do this race it is different, and no doubt you will learn something new, however, what you learn most likely will not be applicable to the next edition of the race,' said Harvey. 'It’s like a long day race where you have a basic plan based on forecasting and tides, but then you have to be able to change you plan and adapt quickly to changing conditions during the course of the race.'

Coming from farther afield is Arthur Santry (Arlington, Va.), who sailed the Ker 50 Temptation–Oakcliff to second last year in one of the IRC classes. He foresees a 'dog fight' once again with Larry Huntington’s (New York, N.Y.) Snow Lion, another Ker 50 that finished third last year; James Sykes’ (New York, N.Y.) Santa Cruz 52 Bombardino; and Steve and Heidi Benjamin’s (Norwalk, Conn.) new entrant Spookie, a Carkeek 40. 'Yes, sailing against Spookie will be scary stuff,' said Santry with a chuckle. 'I haven’t sailed against her, but I know Steve and Heidi really well; they are incredible sailors and that boat just screams off wind. Who knows how the weather system will finally set up, but if it is a northwest breeze behind us leaving the Sound, Spookie could be as much as 10 miles ahead of us by the time we get to Block Island. Beating back, Temptation’s speed would be better than Spookie’s so it’s a question of whether we have enough runway to catch her. It should be a lot of fun.'

Temptation is one of four boats entered in the competition by Oakcliff Sailing Center, a non-profit training center based in Oyster Bay, N.Y. dedicated to raising the level of sailors and sailing in the United States. Santry 'sponsors' the boat and sails regularly with a core team that is rounded out with Oakcliff students and often times his own teenage kids. (14-year-old Richie Santry will sail with his father in this Block Island Race.)

The Block Island Race was first held in 1946 and is a qualifier for the North Ocean Racing Trophy (IRC), the Double Handed Ocean Racing Trophy (IRC), the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF), and the Gulf Stream Series (IRC). The Block Island Race is also a qualifier for the Caper, Sagola, and Windigo trophies awarded by the YRA of Long Island Sound and the ‘Tuna' Trophy for the best combined IRC scores in the Edlu (40%) and the Block Island Race (60%).

For more information on the Storm Trysail Club Block Island Race, visit the event website.
upffront 660x82Southern Spars - 100Schaefer 2016 Ratchet Block 660x82

Related Articles

Clipper Round the World Yacht Race - Crew catch up - Meet Dhruv Boruah
After crew members have completed their global ocean adventure, some go back to their previous lives and occupations After crew members have completed their global ocean adventure, some go back to their previous lives and occupations, some decide on a future in the marine industry, some take time out to assess their next move in life and others seek their next challenge.
Posted today at 5:49 am
Changing of the Guard at Melges 20 Worlds, Freides takes over
The second day of racing at the 2016 Melges 20 World Championship featured two races under shifty conditions 2016 Melges 20 World Championship - The second day of racing at the 2016 Melges 20 World Championship hosted by Marina di Scarlino/Club Nautico Scarlino featured two races under shifty conditions, shaking up the standings and making Drew Freides' Pacific Yankee the new leader with a one point advantage over Michael Illbruck on Pinta now seated in second place.
Posted today at 4:40 am
Vendée Globe – Yann Eliès and his team relaunch 60-ft IMOCA in Lorient
Yann is now on the final stretch before the event and will be taking part in the three training courses. Yann is now on the final stretch before the event and will be taking part in the three training courses organised at the Finistère Ocean Racing Centre in Port-la-Forêt (Brittany). He will also take part in the Azimut Trophy. Yann Eliès tells us about the work that has been done and what lies ahead in the final part of his preparation.
Posted on 26 Aug
Vendée Globe – A long trip between France and Iceland for Heerema
After completing two solo transatlantic crossings in the spring, Pieter Heerema is currently on his third major trip. After completing two solo transatlantic crossings in the spring, Pieter Heerema is currently on his third major trip. Thanks to this voyage from France to Iceland and back, the Dutch skipper is finding out more about No Way Back, the new generation IMOCA on which he will line up on 6th November
Posted on 26 Aug
Phoenix returns and Cayard is back for the TP52 World Championships
Richard Cohen will compete at the championships in Mahón, Menorca, with Phoenix, which will be skippered by Paul Cayard. The carefully assembled team includes a core group of sailors who have many years of experience in the class, but Cayard cautions that their initial objective is to learn and improve together in line with their long term goal, to be competitive on the 2017 52 Super Series.
Posted on 26 Aug
Michael Marshall triumphs at J/22 World Championship
With a second place finish in Thursday’s only race, Mike Marshall, Todd Hiller and Luke Lawrence are the champions. Heading into the 10th and final race, Marshall and Chris Doyle were tied on points at 30. As the 41 teams arrived at CORK in the morning, the after effects of an overnight storm left breeze in the mid-20s, so the Race Committee postponed on shore.
Posted on 25 Aug
Best pictures of the first 4 Acts of the Extreme Sailing Series™
An influx of fresh talent have all added to the hype, but the greatest evolution is the replacement of the Extreme 40. An influx of fresh talent, new venues and a revised race format have all added to the hype, but the greatest evolution is the replacement of the Extreme 40 by a smaller, faster catamaran: the flying GC32.
Posted on 25 Aug
Return to Russia for the Extreme Sailing Series™
Joining the fleet as the season heads into its second half is Gazprom Team Russia, led by WMRT champion, Phil Robertson. With one week to go, the fleet returns to St Petersburg for the fifth Act of the season, presented by SAP, 35 of the world’s best sailors are getting their heads in the game and preparing for the one of the trickiest venues of the season so far.
Posted on 25 Aug
Marshall and Doyle tied on points at J/22 World Championship
By way of a victory in Wednesday’s third race, Mike Marshall, Todd Hiller and Luke Lawrence are tied at 30 points By way of a victory in Wednesday’s third race, Mike Marshall, Todd Hiller and Luke Lawrence are tied at 30 points with Chris Doyle, Will Harris and Adam Burns. Jeff Todd is still in the hunt in third place with 35 points.
Posted on 24 Aug
Debriefing the 2016 Rio Olympics—Sailing news North America and beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 23 Aug