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Back from Malaysia

by Jarrod Day, FishingBoating-World editor on 23 Sep 2013
Kuala Rompin’s Sailfish bonanza. Jarrod Day
While I have just returned from fishing in Kuala Rompin, Malaysia, I had heard many stories prior to my journey of hundreds of sailfish which migrate annually to this region of the South China Sea. I was so keen to experience such a sight, that this was something I had to see with my own eyes.

Without a lie in the world, it was just as described. A long boat trip in glass calm conditions some 65nm off the coast. On arrival, hundreds of thousands of terns and other bird life were all flying around dive bombing the waters surface on the huge schools of anchovies. Amongst the turmoil, large black dorsal fins could be seen in the hundreds, rounding up bait, the sailfish were here right on queue.

I travelled to Rompin through Oceanblue fishing adventures, a company which offers fishing trips to exotic destination around the world.

I spent four days with some good friends targeting the sails and to my surprise; they were more than forthcoming to devour the live baits presented to them.

While I will elaborate more on this trip in the coming week’s features, I will provide you with a little taste of what I got to experience below in the attached youtube clip.

Over all, we managed to catch and release 28 sailfish to 45kg’s and missed a further 29 sails due to pulling the hooks, false hook-ups etc.

Kuala Rompin is a place that can’t be described in words, it has to bee seen to be believed. If this trip is of interest to you, jump onto this website and contact David Noble.

Click on image to watch YouTube Video:



While I was away, the team at fishingboating-world have been busy little bee’s and have been hard at it to deliver a great list of comprehensive features.

Carl Hyland looks into the world of sea run trout in Tasmania. Sea runners are very popular amongst anglers and while they are great fun to catch, are often exceptional sizes. Carl explains that if you can find where the brackish fresh water meets the salty brine, that’s usually the spot, where the brutes are to be found.



Ben Knaggs takes an interesting look at fishing and explains the use of using your sounder/GPS, in particular the bottom features to find fish. Contour lines which show the depth, steep drop-offs and reefs can be used to find fish, providing you know how to read and understand your depth sounder and GPS unit.



Gary Brown might be superstitious, but when it comes to fishing he takes no chances. Around the globe, there are many superstitious stories that anglers are aware of and try to avoid at all costs. Present superstitious beliefs date back several centuries and include these prominent examples: its bad luck to sail on a Friday. If you whistle or sing into the wind on a boat, a storm is sure to follow. Sailors who wear earrings or have tattoos won't drown. It's bad luck to have women onboard because they make the sea angry or jealous. Rats leaving a ship are a sign of trouble. Take it as you want, but the last thing you need when on the water is a bit of bad luck.



Lee Brake takes a look at Teemburra Dam in Queensland. This water way is quite a popular destination and as Lee explains, there is plenty of fishing to be undertaken.



And I take a look at high speed spinning for Spanish mackerel. When it comes to targeting pelagics, Spanish mackerel tick all the boxes. Found in the warmer waters of the Indo-West Pacific region, particularly in tropical and sub-tropical waters. They are offshore, pelagic (surface-dwelling) fish and live around offshore and coastal reefs. Spanish mackerel are pack hunters, swimming in large schools terrorising baitfish. For an angler in search, they are lure eating machines and put up a fair and entertaining battle. Vicious in their attack response, they are everything a sports fisho dreams of. They strip line from a reel at high speed, take any lure presented to them and go aerial when hooked-up, what more could you ask for?



Until next week,

Wildwind 2016 660x82NaiadZhik ZKG 660x82

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