Please select your home edition
Edition
Auckland On Water Boat Show

AC72 speed and a Farr 40 report—Sailing news from the U.S. and beyond

by David Schmidt, Sail-World USA Editor on 20 Mar 2013
Artemis Racing and Oracle Team USAAC72 training in San Francisco Bay in early February Artemis Racing http://www.artemisracing.com
While Oracle Team USA, Emirates Team New Zealand (ETNZ) and Luna Rossa Challenge all managed to get up on their foils within a few days of first trimming-on the wingsails of their mighty AC72s, the Challenger of Record, Artemis Racing, has been beleaguered with speed issues since day one. Artemis Racing, it will be remembered, headed back to the shed a few weeks ago after some two-boat testing with Oracle Team USA on San Francisco Bay revealed some 'significant' speed deficits compared to the American boat. Now, the Swedish-flagged team is finally starting to release (a small amount of) media involving their latest composite-construction surgery.


While the main goal of Artemis’ shed exercise is to get the mighty catamaran up on foils like her Kiwi, American and Italian 'friends', the team is also trying to coax every extra knot of boatspeed out of their first-generation AC72. According to Andy Fethers, Luna Rossa’s bowman, one of the other tasks facing the team is to improve the boat’s aerodynamic profile.


Inside, check out the teaser video showing the team’s efforts (as well as a sneak preview of what the team’s modified AC72 will look like) at making their boat faster through the air, and stay tuned for more updates from Artemis’ camp, as they become known.


Meanwhile, down in Florida, the racing action was hot at the Farr 40 Miami Beach Invitational. According to reports, two down-to-the-wire finishes determined the regatta’s final podium positions. 'It feels great,' said Wolfgang Schaefer, skipper of 'Struntje Light', which won the event by a one-point delta over 'Plenty'. 'We were a little bit worried because we had old sails, but we had good speed downwind and [tactician] Peter [Holmberg] did a tremendous job the whole regatta. We also have very good trimmers and they make life easy for me.'


Everyone involved agreed that the racing was ultra-close. 'It was a hard-fought win and those always taste the best,' said Holmberg. 'We had very tricky conditions out there all week. I think the key was to get a feel for what the wind was doing on a particular day. It required a loose style of sailing and be ready to make adjustments because things could change from one leg to the next.'

Get the full scoop from the Farr 40 Miami Beach Invitational, inside this issue.


Also inside, get the latest scoop on ETNZ’s fortunately small mishap with one of their wingsails down in New Zealand, check-out the post-racing report from the St. Mary's Women’s Intersectional Regatta and don’t miss the event preview from the Edgartown Yacht Club’s Big Boat Buoy Races and ’Round the Island Race.

May the four winds blow you safely home,

Bakewell-White Yacht DesignZhik Dinghy 660x82Newport Boat Show 2016 660x82

Related Articles

Countdown to Rio - Sailing news from the North America and beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 26 Jul
Hawaii & Transat races, Rio - Sailing news from North America & beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 19 Jul
NSHOF, offshore racing and foils - Sailing news from North America
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 12 Jul
Brawn v Brain? The Bar or The Room?
Interesting questions and can they possibly be linked in any way. Interesting questions and can they possibly be linked in any way. Is it just the one connection, or could there indeed be several ways to address this conundrum? Well the route of the answer could be SailX, the online inshore racing game.
Posted on 7 Jul
Race to Alaska, Hawaii, Olympics—Sailing news from the U.S. and beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 5 Jul
National birthdays & sailing—Sailing news from North America & beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 28 Jun
Volvo Ocean Race adds full Southern Ocean Leg and 5000nm to new course
Volvo Ocean Race has announced a new course for the 2017/18 round the world event. Several major changes are planned including a return to a full Southern Ocean leg, and the addition of a massive Leg 5 of 13,300nm - the longest leg ever sailed in the Volvo Ocean Race. By way of comparison a minimum circumnavigation around the planet is approximately 21,600nm to be recognised as, a record for the course by WSSRC.
Posted on 28 Jun
Bermuda Race, ACWS, Rio Olympics—Sailing news from the U.S. and beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 14 Jun
Foiling into the Windy City
. .
Posted on 10 Jun
ACWS, Bermuda, and the Clipper—Sailing news from the U.S. and beyond
Editorial Editorial
Posted on 7 Jun