Please select your home edition
Edition
Pantaenius EU 728x90

Joe Glanfield on the quest for Rio gold

by Lindsey Bell on 4 Mar 2013
Nick Rogers (R) and Joe Glanfield (L) of Great Britain celebrate finishing second placed overall following the Men’s 470 class medal race held at the Qingdao Olympic Sailing Center during day 10 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 18, 2008 in Qingdao, China. © Clive Mason
Sailor Joe Glanfield returns to competition – teaming with Luke Patience – on a quest for gold at the 2016 Rio Sailing Competition, discusses the campaign in his latest blog entry:

I guess the first question I need to answer is why have I come back to 470 sailing? It would be most interesting to say that two silver medals had left me with sleepless nights and deep regrets, and the only way to settle these is by winning gold in 2016, but this would not be true! I look back at the three Olympic Games I competed in (all with Nick Rogers) knowing we made mistakes and could have been better, but I also look back at them very fondly and am proud of what we achieved together.

I would put my desire to compete again down to three main factors. Firstly, I have spent a lot of time since 2008 visiting schools (on behalf of the Youth Sport Trust and 21st Century Legacy) and talking to pupils about their aspirations, working hard and pursuing their dreams. Whilst talking to them I realised I had fallen into the trap of taking for granted how lucky I was that I was able to do what I loved. Sailing and competing at the Olympics has always been my dream, I feel completely natural in that environment and realised campaigning towards 2016 was probably going to be my last opportunity. In some respects I guess it was the London Olympic legacy having an influence on me!

Secondly, since I stopped 470 sailing I have coached some of the world’s best sailors. I coached Hannah Mills and Saskia Clark, Sarah Ayton and past 49er World Champions Stevie Morrison and Ben Rhodes and learned things from all of them that I wish I had known when I was sailing. The coaching also helped me develop and try out my own theories on training and competing, and I really want to bring this new knowledge and perspective back to my 470 sailing. I am sure it can help me be a much better competitor then I ever was before.

The last influencing factor was the opportunity to step straight in with Luke [Patience]. With Luke I am getting a helm who knows how to make a 470 go fast and has already proved he can thrive in the pressure environment of a home Olympics. I believe sailors need to adapt and change and learn new things from different people in order to fulfil their potential. I am sure Luke and I have a lot to learn from each other - undoubtedly there will be teething problems, but in the long run these variations in methods and approaches will help us make new improvements as sailors.

Gold in Rio, of course, is mine and Luke’s ultimate goal. We both want to be gold medallists. I want to join that tiny list of British sailors who have won three Olympic medals and be the first 470 sailor to achieve that. That is the dream and if I allow it, it does keep me up at night.

For now though I am living a much more hand-to-mouth existence, just trying to get back into it. I have had to put a lot of effort into bringing my fitness levels up, as they had somewhat slid since I stopped competing in 2008! This has been through a combination of gym work and running/cycling to improve my aerobic fitness and start to lose weight. I have been working closely with the sports science team – particularly our Head of Sports Science Paul Mullan, physio Lily Devine and strength and conditioning coach Steve Gent – and it has been rewarding to see improvements. I often run and cycle the same routes around Exmouth and now a few months into training I can see times coming down and my routes needing to get longer. I feel like these early days of training are about treading a fine line – I need to make fitness improvements fast, but illness or injury at this stage would be a big setback. So far so good though, I am listening to my body and the experts, and things are movingly along nicely.

The most fun has been on the water. We have completed two training camps in Murcia, Spain, and Luke and I both felt they went really well. I was pretty rusty to start with (well I still am!). I even fell out of the boat, but we felt like we communicated well between us, and the roles in the boat were fairly obvious. Of course there are massive holes in our sailing and we are still yet to race but the important thing is we feel we can learn quickly together and we share a similar vision of how we want to improve and the team we want to become. Steve Lovegrove has been coaching the squad and is keeping us moving in the right direction. We don’t need to be the best in the world yet, we just need to know how we are going to get there!

It feels exciting to be sailing again, every training session has been enjoyable. I am really looking forward to our first proper strong wind sail – the kind where you are clinging on and just trying to get around the course with the mast still pointing upwards! Bring on the mistral in Hyeres!

Our first opportunity to race will be at a training regatta in Palma during March, which in turn will hopefully help us prepare for the World Cup events of Princess Sofia Trophy, also in Palma, and the Hyeres Regatta in April. We have no result expectations for these two events – we just want to use them as a benchmark for where we are against a world class fleet, and to give direction to our training whilst preparing for the European and World Championships this summer.

Luke and I have a very clear vision of the sailors we want to be by 2016 and the sort of campaign we need to run in order to get there. We have started the process of searching for sponsorship and suppliers to help us create this campaign.

For now, thanks to everyone who is helping us build momentum, next is more training (in Weymouth next week) then out to Palma for our first experience of racing together, very exciting! We will keep you PatienceGlanfield
Bakewell-White Yacht DesignInSunSport - NZBarz Optics - Melanin Lenses

Related Articles

America's Cup - Arbitration Panel Hearing over Kiwi Qualifier for July
ACEA CEO, Russell Coutts has confirmed that the Arbitration Panel will hold its first Hearing in July. In a yet to be published interview in Sail-World, America’s Cup Events Authority CEO, Russell Coutts has confirmed that the Arbitration Panel will hold its first Hearing in July. This is the first official indication that the three person Arbitration Panel had even been formed, however Sail-World’s sources indicated that it had been empanelled since last January, possibly earlier.
Posted on 27 May
Rio 2016 - The Qualification Games - Part 2
Yachting NZ's refusal to nominate in three classes won in the first round of 2016 Olympic Qualification is unprecedented Yachting New Zealand's refusal to nominate in three classes won in the first round of 2016 Olympic Qualification is without precedent. Subject to Appeal, the Kiwis have signaled that they will reject 30% of the positions gained in the ISAF World Sailing Championships in Santander in 2014.
Posted on 22 May
Gladwell's Line - World Sailing changes tack after IOC windshift
Over the past year, we've given the International Sailing Federation (now re-badged as World Sailing) a bit of stick Over the past year, we've given the International Sailing Federation (now re-badged as World Sailing) a bit of stick. Every blow well earned over issues such as the pollution at Rio, the Israeli exclusion abomination plus a few more. But now World Sailing is getting it right.
Posted on 21 May
Rio 2016 - The Qualification Games - Part 1
Antipodean selection shenanigans aside, the Qualification system for the Rio Olympics appears to be achieving its goals Antipodean selection shenanigans aside, the Qualification system for the Rio Olympics appears to be achieving goals set in the Olympic Commission report of 2010. Around 64 countries are expected to be represented in Rio de Janeiro in August. That is a slight increase on Qingdao and Weymouth, but more importantly a full regional qualification system is now in place
Posted on 19 May
Taming the beast-a conversation with Stuart Meurer of Parker Hannifin
While AC72 cats were fast, they difficult to control, so Oracle partnered with Parker Hannifin to innovate a better way. If you watched videos of the AC72s racing in the 34th America’s Cup (2013), you’re familiar with the mind-boggling speeds that are possible when wingsail-powered catamarans switch from displacement sailing to foiling mode. While foiling is fast, there’s no disguising the platform’s inherent instability. Now, Oracle Team USA has teamed up with Parker Hannifin to innovate a better way.
Posted on 18 May
From foiling Moths to Olympic starting lines-a Q&A with Bora Gulari
Bora Gulari’s is representing the USA at the Rio 2016 Olympics in the Nacra 17 class, along with teammate Louisa Chafee. Bora Gulari (USA) has made a strong name for himself within high-performance sailing circles, with wins at the 2009 and 2013 Moth Worlds. In between, he broke the 30-knort barrier and was the 2009 US SAILING Rolex Yachtsman of the Year. His latest challenge is representing the USA at the Rio 2016 Olympics in the Nacra 17 class as skipper, along with his teammate Louisa Chafee.
Posted on 12 May
Concern for Zika at Rio Olympics is now deadly serious
Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, or the Rio Olympics. Many others have, and they were apt, but things have changed. So here now we have a situation where one man, Associate Professor Amir Attaran, who does have a more than decent string of letters after his name, is bringing nearly as many facts to bear as references at the article's end
Posted on 12 May
The importance of being Alive
Since buying the stunningly pretty Reichel-Pugh canting keel 66-footer, and re-naming her Alive, Since buying the stunningly pretty Reichel-Pugh canting keel 66-footer, and re-naming her Alive, the team have lined up for a lot of things, won plenty and nabbed a record, as well. She’s presently in a yard in the Philippines having a minor refit in readiness for the Australian season. It will commence with the upcoming Brisbane to Keppel and then head sharply into this year’s Hobart.
Posted on 10 May
Zhik - The brand born of a notion, not its history
here is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline is officially marketed as Made For Water There is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline has been officially marketed as Made For Water, and this is precisely what the company has done for the last eight years before the succinct and apt strapline came from out of R&D and into mainstream visibility.
Posted on 8 May
Shape of next Volvo Ocean Race revealed at Southern Spars - Part 1
Southern Spars has been confirmed as the supplier of spars for the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race. In mid-April, Race Director, Jack Lloyd and Stopover Manager Richard Mason outlined the changes expected for the 40,000nm Race during a tour of Southern Spars 10,000sq metre specialist spar construction facility. A total of up to seven boats is expected to enter, but time is running out for the construction of any new boats.
Posted on 3 May