Radio Communications

there are three types of radio communications are found aboard sailing boats that go to sea, HF(High Frequency), VHF(Very High Frequency) and 27Mhz

Click HERE for more information about these three types.

A licence is necessary to operate these radios, and you'll find all inforamtion about this subject on the Australian Maritime College website

However, it’s a big subject. THISsame is a site with frequently asked questions about amateur radio in Australia


Here are some of the courses are available in all states for a Radio Operator’s Certificate of Proficiency:

Sydney: Club Sail
Victoria: Western Port Marine Rescue
North Queensland : Club Sail
South East Queensland: Learn to Sail

Just a reminder, however, if it is a while since you did the course, here are the basic procedures to be followed for the three important types of radio call:

Distress call
To be used if IN GRAVE AND IMMINENT DANGER and you require immediate assistance. Example is a vessel sinking or on fire. It is NOT to be used for urgency calls which relate to individual crew members - this is inappropriate.

Mayday, Mayday, Mayday (from the French M'aide)
This is [Name and call sign if you have one] (spoken three times)
Mayday
[Name and call sign if you have one]
Details of the vessel’s position
Nature of distress and assistance required
Other information including number of persons on board

It is recommended that you also activate your EPIRB in addition to making a Mayday call.

Urgency call
The urgency call is used when there is concern on the SAFETY OF YOUR VESSEL OR A PERSON. Example is a medical emergency or a man overboard.

Pan Pan, Pan Pan, Pan Pan (Does anyone know the origin?)
Hello all stations, Hello all stations, Hello all stations
This is [Name and call sign if you have one] (spoken three times)
Details of the vessels position
Details of assistance required and other information

Safety call
The safety warning is used if you need to broadcast an IMPORTANT SAFETY WARNING. Example is a partly submerged object or an accidentally activated EPIRB.

Saycure-e-tay, Saycure-e-tay, Saycure-e-tay (from the French Securite)
Hello all stations, Hello all stations, Hello all stations
This is [Name and call sign if you have one] (spoken three times)
Details of the warning / announcement

VHF Distress, Urgency and Safety calls can be initiated on channel 16, and continued on any other appropriate channel.

HF Distress, Urgency and Safety calls can be initiated on 4125, 6215 and 8291, they may be continued on these channels or change to channels 2182, 12290 or 16420 if better reception is required
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