Please select your home edition
Radio Spectrum Management - 2

America's Cup- Jobson goes one on one with Ainslie (Part 1)

by ISAF Media on 21 Jan 2014
Oracle Team USA John Mangino
Following his sit down with Oracle Team USA skipper Jimmy Spithill, ISAF Vice-President Gary Jobson met with Ben Ainslie (GBR) shortly afterwards.

Ainslie was drafted in to replace John Kostecki mid-way through the 34th America's Cup on-board Oracle Team USA and played a key part in one of the finest sporting comebacks of all time.

Jobson sat down with Ainslie at the end of 2013 to find out a little bit more about the British sailor in Part 1 of 3... the three part series will be published on the ISAF website, in the coming days.

Gary Jobson

'We all watched very carefully there and it's no secret that Oracle Team USA was a little bit behind the eight ball there digging deeper and deeper. And there was a change. And you were the change coming onboard. So how did it feel coming on a third of the way through the regatta and oh no, feeling like you had some pressure on your shoulders? How did you feel?'

Ben Ainslie

'We were obviously in a pretty difficult situation as a team. We were definitely in dire straits. I think all of you here who are sailors would know what the sport is like. There's a lot of different components to it. So, yes, we were in a difficult spot. We weren't going particularly well. Our speed wasn't that good, particularly on the upwind legs. I think the idea was to just bring in a fresh face and a different perspective.

'So my goal was to be Mr. Positive even though things were looking just about as bad as they could be, to try and get some enthusiasm going. Of course this America's Cup, I think, was always going to be a development race with the new class of boat with the AC72 multihulls and foiling and everything that goes with that. There was always a chance that we could develop faster than any other team and build some confidence from that. Ultimately that is what happened.

'It was definitely a team effort. It was about the designers, the boat builders, the sailors, everyone coming together to make some actually quite small changes. There's been a lot of talk about Herbie's? I don't even know what a Herbie is. Maybe someone else here knows.'

Audience Member

'The Love Bug.'


'Yes, exactly. So I don't think it had anything to do with us winning the America's Cup. It was about small changes. Developing that. Developing the technique on the boat with the sailors and the designers and then ultimately winning some races and getting some confidence.'

[Sorry, this content could not be displayed]

'Talk about getting confidence, I was in Weymouth, England last summer when you got your fourth Gold medal. Pretty impressive. But in fairness I think you kind of dug a little hole for yourself early in the regatta in Weymouth and you had to dig yourself out of the hole. And in the end you had that unbelievable race, I was on the Nothe that day, when you came through and got the point that you needed and won it all.

'The fact that you were able to do that last year, did that give you some confidence that you could pull it off again at this level this year in the America's Cup?'


'They're different challenges but certainly I've been in a lot of difficult spots in my career as I know you have and a lot of great sailors have. Ultimately if you're going to put yourself in those positions you're going to end up in tough spots from time to time. I think in this particular instance with this America's Cup, it was really a credit to the team. There was no finger pointing. There were no heated arguments.

'Okay we were clearly at a disadvantage early on in the event. We were clearly behind speed wise. But the team just kept to the task and I guess really that's probably a credit to the management really. Guys like Russell Coutts, Grant Simmer, Larry Ellison to just keep sticking with the team, keep trying to develop, increase the performance of the boat. It's very easy when things are going wrong to start pointing the finger and even give up early on so I think it was impressive that the team stuck with it.'


'It was certainly impressive that nobody gave up. It's a real lesson there. I think it is intriguing that you were a singlehanded sailor, Lasers, and then the Finn, and Tom Slingsby won a Gold medal in the Laser in Weymouth last summer. But it is fascinating to listen to the two of you talk. I think it is a really good lesson for all sailors, particularly young people, that communication makes a difference. Did you plan that out? Because in a Finn you don't get to talk too much to anybody.'


'What are you trying to say? It was an amazing experiment because I wanted to sort of, depending on the boat, it was really putting three helmsmen together in the back of the boat. Jimmy and I had never really sailed together and I'd never sailed with Tom Slingsby either. So it was a bit of a gamble for sure.

'I have to give a lot of credit to John Kostecki who had done a fantastic job. John had done a fantastic job as tactician up until that point and I think the changes really, it wasn't that John had necessarily done anything wrong, it was the fact that really there just needed to be some kind of a change to try and up the atmosphere on the boat because things were not looking good. John was just amazing because they made the change. He'd already left for home and I called him up and I said look John, I'm sorry about this. It is difficult and all the rest of it. He said look, it's fine. I want the team to do well. I'll come in tomorrow morning and we'll go through all the software. You know we had all the starting software and navigational software and navigational software which I hadn't even seen up until that point because I'd been steering the other boat. So to have that kind of support, I think that is just the measure of the sort of team it was that someone like John, despite the ultimate disappointment of not being on the boat racing any more, he still wanted to help the team. A lot of credit to him.'


'I would say that John Kostecki's reputation is intact. He's won an around the world race, he's got an Olympic medal and he's won the America's Cup. Which makes me think that you've won the America's Cup, you've got multiple medals but you haven't won an around the world race.'


'I don't think many of us have.'


'Is it on your bucket list here to go around the world?'


'Not really. No.'


'So the Finn is tough and the America's Cup is tough but at the end of the day you get a shower.'


'Yes. My Dad actually competed in the first ever Whitbread Race it was back then in '73 I think. So sailing has definitely been in my family. I would just like to say the reason why we are all here tonight is obviously I think probably, I think everyone in the world knows someone, a friend, family members, have been involved with cancer or suffer from cancer. It's obviously a very difficult disease to go through. My father actually suffers from Prostate cancer and so I know firsthand what a lot of people here have gone through. It's a very difficult thing to have to deal with. I just think it is an amazing thing that you are all here tonight and raising these funds and keep at it. It makes a huge difference.'


'Thank you. That's very kind to say. Does the name Carl VanDuyne ring a bell?'




'So Carl Van Duyne was a senior at Princeton and won the Gold Cup. Was an Olympian in Tokyo in 1968. And sadly, Carl, at the age of 34 after getting his PhD at Stanford, Princeton undergrad, Stanford, passed away of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. And one of the interesting things about Carl is in the Olympic Games in '68 he was winning a race and he hit the windward mark. Nobody saw him hit the windward mark but his conscience was his guide and he reported it and he got disqualified and did not win a medal that year. But the rules were changed that you could re-round the mark after that time so he had a lasting impression. Carl Van Duyne was an inspiration to me. He grew up on the Jersey shore like me. I just wondered if you had known about him?'


'That's a very famous story about the situation in the Olympics and hitting the mark. That's one of the great things about sailing, there's a lot of sportsmanship involved. Some great stories over the years of some great sailors who have done some amazing things. I think that is why we all love the Website

Absolute MarineZhik OceanHella Marine - July 2016

Related Articles

America's Cup - Emirates Team NZ at the start of the Coastal Classic
Emirates Team NZ have released a video from the start of the 2016 PIC Coastal Classic Emirates Team NZ have released a video from the start of the 2016 PIC Coastal Classic which features a lot of low level up-sun drone footage.
Posted today at 12:07 am
A Vendée Globe of all the extremes
In addition to different career paths, the geographical origins of the sailors are very different this time around. In addition to different career paths, the geographical origins of the sailors are very different this time around.
Posted on 27 Oct
Black Baza outwits bigger boats at the China Cup International Regatta
Anthony Root’s Ker 42 custom footer outsmarted her larger competition in the extremely light and patchy breezes Anthony Root’s Ker 42 custom footer outsmarted her larger competition in the extremely light and patchy breezes and managed to pick a way through the wind holes to take the winner’s gun ahead of the bigger boats.
Posted on 27 Oct
Top Chinese solo sailor missing on record attempt to cross Pacific
Top Chinese solo sailor Guo Chuan has gone missing while trying to break the record for crossing the Pacific alone The first Chinese sailor to sail single handed around the world alone, Guo Chuan has gone missing while trying to break the record for crossing the Pacific alone. He was a few days into a voyage from San Francisco to Shanghai sailing alone on a large transoceanic trimaran.
Posted on 27 Oct
America's Cup - Dramatic wingsail break on SoftBank Team Japan
All are safe after a broken wing appendage onboard SoftBank Team Japan’s AC45 Sport ended testing yesterday. All are safe after a broken wing appendage onboard SoftBank Team Japan’s AC45 Sport ended testing yesterday as the sailors pushed the upper wind limit of the platform on the Great Sound in Bermuda. The broken wing suffered a significant fracture in the lower trailing flap causing the entire lower portion to detach completely.
Posted on 27 Oct
Collinson FX Market Commentary - Oct 27 - Aussie CPI jump surprise
The Australian CPI jumped to 0.7%, greater than expected, boosting the AUD over 0.7700 The Australian CPI jumped to 0.7%, greater than expected, boosting the AUD over 0.7700. This was not sustained in overnight markets, with the AUD slipping back to 0.7650, while the NZD traded around 0.7150. NZ domestic markets will consider Trade data today and speculate on the important US GDP number to be released at the end of the week.
Posted on 27 Oct
Exit interview with Josh Adams, US Sailing's Olympic boss, part one
I caught up with Josh Adams, Managing Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing at US Sailing, for a two-part job-exit interview. While the USA is a historically strong sailing nation, the team suffered a medal-ceremony shutout at the London 2012 Olympics. A planned leadership change transpired and Josh Adams was named Managing Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing. Unfortunately, the job requires constant travel, which doesn’t mix with raising kids and Adams recently resigned. I talked with him for a two-part job-exit interview.
Posted on 26 Oct
Vendée Globe – Master of the School of Hard Knocks
Jérémie Beyou ranks as one of the favourites to win this eighth edition. His two last attempts ended in early abandons. Triumphant in the summer's warm up New York – Vendée Transatlantic Race and three times winner of La Solitaire du Figaro, the incredibly competitive solo one design classic stage offshore race which is sailed each summer in 32-foot one design Bénéteau Figaro 2s, Jérémie Beyou on Maître CoQ ranks as one of the favourites to win this eighth edition
Posted on 26 Oct
The Gitana Team Series – Awakening the senses – Smell
This week, Sébastien Josse has left the Vendée to hook up with his Breton way of life, at home, not far from Lorient. It is just eleven days until the start of the eighth Vendée Globe. In Port Olona, the public is out in force, the village and the pontoons are always full and the pressure mounts a little more each day for the twenty-nine solo sailors, who will set sail on 6 November 2016.
Posted on 26 Oct
Melges 24 World Championship in Miami – 30 days to go
This championship is anticipated to be the most crowded event of the international one-design sailing scene this year. With the day of the first start quickly approaching, the organizing machine is working in full swing: for an event of such importance, everything from race management to the on-shore activities must be organized down to the smallest detail.
Posted on 26 Oct