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America's Cup Questionnaire- Checking in at the 1,000 response mark

by Richard Gladwell on 23 Oct 2010
"We want more TV technology" - 34th America’s Cup - TV Trials .. .

The survey responses continue to pour in for Sail-World's survey on the announced format for the 34th America's Cup and Match racing generally.

Having now received 1,000 responses the margin of error from the sample has reduced considerably over the first sample of just over 200 responses, taken after the first day of polling.

After the first day of Sail-World readers world-wide, 67.65% of those who responded would rather watch a match between monohulls than multihulls. At the 1,000 response mark, that trend has hardened to over 72% with 28% preferring to watch a match race in multihulls.

The responses continue to come from hardcore racing sailors with almost 84% is the responders describing themselves as being racing sailors. A change/reduction of just 1% from the first day.

57% of the responses are coming from sailors who have matchraced - again a similar percentage to previously, with 77% saying they had raced in a monohull under 10 metres. 79% of the responders would prefer to sail a monohull in a match race as opposed to a multihull.

The size of boat that is the preference of those viewing match racing has dropped with 58% wanting to view a boat of over 50ft/15metres - down seven percentage points from the first day. Less than 10% of the responders would prefer to view match racing in boats under 10 metres.

The traditionalist are coming to the fore in the type of boat they would rather see used, with 55% wanting a displacement type of boat used (as in all but two of the America's Cups ever sailed) with 44% wanting a fast planing type. In the previous dip of the survey responses, Sail-World readers were evenly balanced in their choice of boat type.

While Sail-World readers are may not be in step with the type of boats chosen for the 34th America's Cup, they are solidly behind the technology changes that have been signalled, and in fact would like to see more technology come into the coverage of the America's Cup and sailing generally, than has been the case in the past.

In fact the call for more technology is quite overwhelming, with not one comment calling for the cameras to be taken off the boats.

If you haven't already had your say http://www.sail-world.com/sweepstakes_form.cfm?SSid=41!click_here and go into the draw to win one of six Musto fleeces


Here are a selection of comments on the use of technology from your responses:

1) More camera's on boats, more audio from the boats

2) More cameras on board and close to the action Graphics on TV to determine who is winning

4) Camera locations at bouys or focused at crosses. Boat manuovres and roundings are the most interesting

9) Foils and proper TV coverage

15) On board commentary/camera

On-board expert cameramen (with stedicam) - capable of catching the relavent action, helping commentators keep audience involved Match racing round robin series is one of the hardest ways to build excitement through course of championships.

20) the vision that is being trialled on the extreme forties and 44's. the computer graphics and commentary as used with the tp 52's. it appears sailing is finally on the edge of becoming a serious spectator sport

22) more internet, more tv - make it available to the masses

25) more use of on board cameras, microphones, graphics, interactive content most of all more coverage, it's a struggle to find any sailing on tv

28) I think the TV coverage is great. There's onboard cameras and mikes, there's on the water shots and the aerial coverage is excellent. Commentators have always been good. For fans at the event, there need to be ways to bring the race course close to shore at one of the markers. And more fan boats out on the course.

29) More TV coverage.

30) Higher quality and quantity of visual coverage, more angles, more cameras on board, display the action on board

34) Better camera coverage. More widely available tracking. Ump cam. Ump debrief right after incident.

37) On board cameras On board commentators

38) More cameras and more sound on the boats.

42) just better camera angles/more cameras and possibly shorter courses

47) On board commentator, shorter legs with more laps

51) More onboard cameras.

62) The America's Cup already has a large following. Put the TV highlights on at a decent time (ie not 11pm) and more people might watch it.

64) On board media is a must. Wide angled lens, good sound from bow to stern. Tight courses. Restrict the width of the course. Keep spectators close and make sure the boats keep engaging. Then it is not so much of a race of design but a race of skill.

65) More onboard footage and possibly audio.

69) More comparative statistics, ie - which boat has an advantage now, who is travelling faster, pointing higher, etc

78) Cameras on Umpire boats

79) On board cameras and computer graphics depicting relative positions of competitors and wind patterns

85) Extensive TV coverage with simple rules explaination (eg. Channel 7's coverage of international Rugby).

87) Make the event more like the Bathurst 500 in terms of video coverage - even when the race is boring they make it intersting by using good editing and talking to the driver.

More cameras on the boat with all crew miked up/headcamed.

GPS tracking system overlays on the race course video to show who is in the lead.

Use Lidar and Tide data overlays on the racecourse to show what the wind and tide is doing.

Expert commentators who actually know something about sailing and match racing but can also make it interesting/informative for non-sailing public.

104) Live comms to the skippers and crew, better on board TV Basically develop what the World Tour is doing at the live tv events.

105) Shorter courses, with more laps, Viewing graphics suitable for 2-screen computers

114) Multimedia - not TV but internet so viewer can select format of viewing. Crew miked up, multi angle video

118) More TV coverage Improved coverage from on board cameras & sound

121) A telecast discussion similar to that used in US football games so the uninitiated can understand what's going on. The world cup lacked much of this so it didn't become a big deal in the USA.

127) One member of the crew being dedicated to media similar to the VOR.

128) more live audio off the boats.

ability to select your own camera shots / audio source (commentary or on-board) for internet viewing in conjunction with Virtual Spectator type graphic representation

135) On board video miked, cameras on umpire boats etc. Viewing platform close by like in England for team racing.

159) ON board cameras. Graphics, perhaps showing options. Expert tactical comments

162) on board video and real time graphics

163) Live commentary by the skippers of their thought process during the race so that those of us who want to learn more about tactics could watch in a more informed manner.

167) Full instrumentation live data off the boats, including tracking + boatspeed/heading/windspeed/etc + voice/ambient sound + heart rate + loading factors such as backstay/mainsheet/genoa/mast/etc Ship to shore to ship communications with coach who can receive all of above and interpret + wind analysis + tracking output of both boats + live tv

171) Microphones on the umpires. I would like to hear what the umpires are saying. I would like to hear the wing calls. There could be a web cam on each boat.

172) GPS plotting to live TV screens, on board cameras, Minimum wind speeds. Screaming Reaches but upwind/downwind course.

173) Exposure innovations. Commentary and race presentation of sailing is terrible most of the time, things aren't well explained enough for a novice or non sailor to understand how and why things are happening, and often so slow paced a racing sailor gets bored.

248) Getting the commentators to describe the tactics in the dial up in a way that the casual viewer will understand. This is the time when the real 'match' takes place.

273) With new technology a monohull yacht 60 to 80 feet with large sail area could be designed to make exciting match racing and with limited sail inventory.

274) Boat on boat tussles. The very close boat on boat action is what draws people in but sometimes the intricacies of these manouvres are hard to depict on a TV screen or in photos. As most match racers know, a race can be won or lost on the very slightest mis-timing in boat handling. Put your bow up while the other boat is going bow down and the race can be over. Being able to explain these intricacies is very important to the viewer.

275) Every one on the boat microphoned up. Heats starting 5 minutes apart on the same racetrack races no longer than 30 minutes per race , at least one complete round per day where everybody sails against other boats at least once..

280) more technical analysis of the different design elements that each team has implemented. Much like the F1 does. Ensuring the maneuverability of the boats for close match racing will also be quite exciting. Again borrowing from other sports, NFL umpires give their rulings immediately and publicly. keeps audience involved and engaged. if the audience could listen in to what’s going on the umpires boat, that would be very interesting.

335) Continuous on board with SOUND. Split screen with other views? Breezy venue women on board

356) Multiple boat cams, with sound and no censorship!! Tactical explanations and options as the racing and pre-start positioning

362) Really good viewing graphics, suitable for streaming on a 2 screen computer

424) 1- live video through the web 2- live 3D graphics tracking, with technical information, explanations 3- well know guys with dedicated marketing 4- multimedia information (social network, text & images) 5- bet on guys ? 6- easier rules to apply

480) More on board cameras showing sheets as they are being tensioned, sail set, view to next mark, view to other vessel, panning of on board activity. Also an on screen view of all the data that I would get on a really well set up match racing yacht including Deckman so I can watch the on the water action but also see the vectors, closing speeds, apparent wind angle, time to go, crossing angles etc of each vessel. Forget the exciting bit. If people are interested they are already there, perhaps as a bit of a bored audience, not from lack of excitement but from lack of more interest. Making it more interesting will secure that audience and bring in those that would watch IF it was more interesting . Otherwise it is a bit like making Opera singing more exciting by playing Jazz.

481) More cameras on board, and better quality.

486) hydrofoils, kite sails, wing sails, just about anything that will make the boats go faster. Then, for spectators, web-broadcast cameras and microphones of every angle, virtual spectator software, and also information like wind, waves, etc.. Just for fun ... after the first race, they should be handicapped, so that it is really a race to the end. The races should be re-handicapped after each race.

487) More cameras, onboard cameraman better coverage

488) Cameras on board

493) on board cameras...clued up commentators...aerial views Graphics explaining various tactical moves.

If you haven't already had your say http://www.sail-world.com/sweepstakes_form.cfm?SSid=41!click_here and go into the draw to win one of six Musto fleeces

Collinson and CoKilwell - 6GAC Pindar Sailing News

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