Hobart Combined Clubs Harbour Series - Galeforce winds stop racing

Moored yachts off Hobart’s Nutgrove Beach being buffeted by the nor’wester today.
Peter Campbell
Hobart Combined Clubs Harbour Series - Galeforce winds blow out Hobart yachting – again! Galeforce north-westerly wind today blew out yachting activities on the River Derwent – for the second consecutive Saturday.

With winds blasting at more than 40 knots and churning up short steep waves on the river, yacht club officials postponed the opening day race of the Series.

The Royal Yacht Club of Tasmania a week ago abandoned the traditional sail past to mark of the official opening of the yachting season because of similar, albeit stronger galeforce winds.

At noon today race officers RJ Badenach and RG Martin announced there would be no racing for the 53 yachts entered for the Harbour Series ‘due to adverse weather conditions.’

’AP’ pennant over code flag ’A" at the Royal Yacht Club of Tasmania indicating that today’s racing has been postponed to another day.
Peter Campbell

However, by hoisting on the club’s mast the ‘AP’ pennant over code flag ‘A', they advised yacht owners that ‘programmed races will be sailed at another date to be advised as the sailing program allows and as determined by the Combined Clubs.’

In France, a storm near the Bay of Biscay, has delayed the sailing of another Tasmanian, Richard Hewson, and 83 other solo sailors in the famous Mini-Transat race across the Atlantic.

Hewson, who grew up and learned to sail in Hobart, skippered the winning yacht in the 2011-2012 Clipper Race Around the World.

The Mini-Transat, for the tiny 6.5m LOA yachts, was to have started on Sunday, but the severe storm has seen race officials postpone it until sometime next week.

The Mini-Transat comprises two legs, 1200 nautical miles from Douarnenez on the coast of France to Lanzarote in the Canary Islands, followed by a 2800 nautical mile leg across the Atlantic to Pointe a Pietre, capital of Guadeloupe.

Race officials said had the Mini-Transat fleet been sent away as scheduled they were likely to encounter the storm at the worst possible place, as they rounded Cape Finistere. Latest reports expect the fleet not to set sail until later this week when the Atlantic weather situation has moderated.
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