News Home Video Gallery Newsletters Photo Gallery Cruising Int

 

Sail-World.com : Respect the rope: Dyneema lifeline guidelines

Respect the rope: Dyneema lifeline guidelines

'Dyneema - hints on its use'    .

Courtesy of Colligo Marine, we here present the first of a series of educational documents that highlight the usage of Dyneema for all aspects of rigging on a sailboat. This Respect the Rope series will discuss the many uses of Dyneema with an emphasis on getting the most value from this great product, showing key attributes and limitations. The first concerns lifeline guidelines:

1: Size lifelines as large as possible, to get at least 2 times more breaking strength as the steel the Dyneema is replacing.
The beauty of Dyneema is its incredible strength, use this to your advantage. Maximize the factor of safety you have on your lifelines by using the largest line possible. This will give you the largest window of opportunity to deal with
issues like chafe and UV damage. At 2 times the strength of the previous steel, you can cut 1/2 way thru the line and still be as strong as the steel was. 3 times the strength will buy you even more time.

2. Eliminate potential chafe issues:
Eliminate any sharp edges especially at the stanchion pass thru holes. You can also add a sacri?cial cover to the line as it passes thru the stanchions for extra chafe resistance with a sacri?cial cover. If there are areas where you
anticipate extra protection is needed such as where a spinnaker sheet might rub than you can also add extra protection there. We provide Dyneema sleeving material for this or you can simply wrap the line with some rigging
tape in the affected areas.

3. All end ?ttings should have a minimum 5/1 bending ratio (minimum 80% break strength maintained at 5/1 but break strength drops off fast if the ratio is less):
Using the proper end ?tting is important as a 5/1 bending ratio maintains a minimum of 80% of the mean breaking load of the line (Most of our pull test results are 100% or more with our line terminators). Our pull testing has
shown that, with a proper splice, the Dyneema line breaks at the bend. A smaller radius means less breaking strength. It is easy to be tempted to just splice the lifeline material to the pulpit or pushpit but this will decrease the life of your line signi?cantly. A small bending radius can be very dangerous as the compounding factors of UV damage, a tight bending radius, and any chafe issues can severely decrease the line strength. Use our line terminators (min 5/1bending ratio) or a thimble and lash to the pulpit/pushpit and keep an eye on the lashing line and replace when needed, this will make your lifelines last longer and save you money in the long run.

4. Inspect regularly for chafe and other issues:
Another big advantage of Dyneema line is that it can be easily inspected. Synthetic lifelines do need to be inspected often but this is relatively easy as damage on your line gets a hairy look to it when it is abraided. Each Dyneema
strand is made up of thousands of minute ?bers and as these break they give a hairy look to the line in the area in question. Most of the time you will notice any chafe issues during normal activity on the boat and if sized correctly you will have some time to protect or replace the line.

5. Understand that your high factor of safety buys you some time in replacing the line:
The high strength of Dyneema is the big enabler for using it in practice. With at least a 2 times strength (from steel) that is needed for the application you will have some time to deal with issues like chafe and even UV degradation.
Knowing that your line can be cut at least halfway thru and still have the strength you need gives you a good warm and fuzzy feeling. Use the largest line diameter that is feasible and Maximize your factor of safety.

A word about UV resistance:
Studies and lab testing have indicated that Dyneema ?bers will initially see some damage from UV rays but then become relatively opaque to UV. This means that the material forms a protective layer and the rate of UV damage goes down to almost nothing after a short time in the sun. This is another reason to give yourself a large strength factor of safety.

Why we use Dynex Dux for lifelines:
We use 5 mm Dynex Dux for lifelines. It is heat stretched Dyneema SK-75. Dynex Dux is much stronger than normal Dyneema (11,000 lbs-f Breaking Strength) but, more importantly, even more chafe resistant.

A note to chafe resistance of Dynex Dux:
We use ceramic knifes that are never supposed to be sharpened (according to several suppliers) and we can get thru about 10 splices before they need to be sharpened. We actually have to saw thru the line with a very sharp knife to cut it.

Some facts about Dux for lifelines:
5 mm dux is stretch equivalent to 3/16 1x19 wire. No creep as there is very little pretension in lifelines. No constructional stretch issues to deal with when splicing to length. 11,000 lbs-f Breaking Strength. Best chafe resistance of any other synthetic line.


About Colligo Marine:
Colligo Marine is the manufacturer of Colligo Dux synthetic standing rigging and associated hardware, luff line roller furlers, and deck hardware focused on the use of high tech synthetic lines for efficient sailboat handling. Colligo Dux synthetic standing rigging provides the greatest value of any synthetic standing rigging product, it is simply the best for overall performance, durability and cost. For more information go to the Colligo Marine?nid=90520 website.




by Colligo Marine

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=90520

10:06 AM Wed 9 Nov 2011 GMT






Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.

Click for further information on
Practical

Related News Stories:

31 Jan 2014  Ten boat safety checks every skipper needs to make
05 Jan 2014  In-mast furling - is it the 'no-no' we've always believed?
13 Nov 2013  Product of the week: One Sailor MBS for single-handed docking
29 Oct 2013  Get your DSC-equipped VHF hooked up right
14 Oct 2013  Evolution Autopilot - top honours in Marine Electronics Awards
30 Sep 2013  Product of the Week: Safer and easier docking - SlideMoor
17 Sep 2013  Mountain bike torch great for tough sailing conditions
16 Sep 2013  Product of the Week: Drawer fridge for cool-keeping and accessibility
25 Aug 2013  Rig your own sailing boat? Yes, you can!
23 Aug 2013  Product of the Week: The LED ringed switch
MORE STORIES ...

Cruising USA



Where in the world are our strongest corals? by Hanny Rivera - Cohen's Lab,








Barnacle Busting by Neil and Ley Langford,


From Penguins to Polar Bears by Cherie Winner,




Polar research: Six priorities for Antarctic science by Mahlon C. Kennicutt II and colleagues,




NCI granted dedicated VHF Channel by National Coastwatch,


Positive news for cruising boats in Greece by The Cruising Association,




















Risks to penguin populations continues by British Antarctic Survey,




Follow these tips when anchoring by Alex and Daria Blackwell,


Galley Guys meet the Spice Lady by Greg Nicoll, Andy Adams and John Armstrong,




If all else fails read the instructions!! by Stuart Carruthers, RYA Cruising Manager,




Phuket Yacht Show: new kid on the block taking on PIMEX? *Feature by Guy Nowell, Sail-World Asia and Phuket Yacht Show,








Flags at Sea, an infographic by John Tissott by Anna Parker and the Sail-World Team,


Cruising lessons from ocean racers
Procedures set out for waterborne visitors to Vanuatu
17-year-old RNLI volunteer saves child in first rescue mission + Video
Teen names latest RNLI Shannon class lifeboat in Poole + Video
Fascinating opportunity with OceansWatch
Fake GPS signals detected when cruising the high seas
Our new Cruising Editor editor remembers his first offshore adventure
Blue Planet Odyssey - Jimmy Cornell playing catch up on North West Pa
World ARC 2014 reaches Australia
Venezuelan Port Control lift recent port restrictions.
Seismic survey ship operating north of Aruba and Curacao
Predictwind helps you pick the best time to depart
Watch this whale lift a Kayak clear out of the water
World ARC reaches half-way point in Australia
Northern Scotland: Voyage to Orkney and Shetland Isles (Part 2) *Feature
Drowning or electric shock? What you need to know to help save a life
Costa Concordia - the $2.25 billion salvage operation ready to begin
Northern Scotland: Voyage to Orkney and Shetland Isles, more photos *Feature
Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show - New location and attractions
Long Island waters could become more taxing this summer
4.8 million Legos all at sea   
Tranquil, colourful and funky, Genoa Bay is a must stop for West Coast *Feature   
Scientist pioneered tracer to reveal hidden ocean flows   
Sail-World 2.0 - the Beta version- Please take a look   
Dredging activity near corals can increase frequency of diseases   
World ARC heading out of the Pacific   
Understanding the Ocean's role in Greenland Glacier melt   
Desolation Sound added to Salish Sea Pilot free cruising guides   
Three Defensive Docking Strategies for Sailors   
Revealing report on Search for American yacht Nina released *Feature   
PredictWind's Weather Routing opens your navigation options - try it!   
Sail-World Cruising Founding Editor Nancy Knudsen says farewell   
Book review: Weather - you like it or not   
Vaavud launches generation 2 wind meter   
The drama begins - North West Passage sailors rescued from ice   
Entering an unfamiliar bay - decision time   
Baby Nemos finding their way home   
High Latitude Sailing - Book of the Week   
Will the Olympics make a difference to Rio pollution? *Feature   
Blue Planet Odyssey, around world rally, begins   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL WAS Cru USA
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT