News Home Video Gallery Newsletters Photo Gallery Cruising Int

 

Sail-World.com : Back to the future? Solar and wind sails for cargo ships

Back to the future? Solar and wind sails for cargo ships

'Solar sails on tanker - the concept'    .

Back to the future for a new world of sailing ships? Solar Sailor, an Australian company specialising in renewable energy technologies, is negotiating to install its solar and wind power systems on a massive dry cargo ship that could be used to haul iron ore from Australia to China.

Solar sails in action - already operating in Hong Kong -  .. .   Click Here to view large photo
The equipment is likely to be similar - but on a more massive scale - to the zero-emission systems the company has installed on four dual-fuel passenger ferries operated by the Hong Kong Jockey Club.

'Solar Albatross' (pictured left) is a 24 meter 100 passenger carrying catamaran ferry with its stow-able SolarSails.

The boat service is between the Hong Kong Jockey Club's Kai Sai Chau Golf Club, ferrying golf club patrons to and from their three island based 18 hole courses off Hong Kong Island.

For the Sydney, Australia based company, the hybrid boat was the first with sails embedded with solar cells to collect the sun's energy and use wind power too. The SolarSails stow flat on the roof of the boat when not in use, although they continue to collect solar energy from the sun and store it in batteries in the two hulls of the catamaran.

The sails are engineered and approved by DNV for 44 knots of apparent wind with a 100% safety factor. The sails can be feathered or lowered into a headwind. In early trials when 'sailing' in a 15 knot true wind at 45 degrees off the bow give a 1.8knot increase in boat speed from 14.2 to 16 knots with no increase in engine rpm

Solar Sailor Holdings chief executive Robert Dane said talks were under way with an Australian mining giant which planned to buy a fleet of ultra-large Capesize bulk ore carriers, to be equipped similarly.

He declined to name the company, pointing out the issue was 'very sensitive', but Solar Sailor is already working on initial development work to install its equipment on new ships as well as retrofitting existing vessels.

He estimated it would cost A$7 million (HK$58 million) to install solar-panel-equipped sails on the bulk carrier but that the owner would save that amount on fuel in just two years.
Electric power from the solar cells would augment power from the diesel engines, while the sail would harness the wind to provide additional thrust that would allow the ship owner to reduce engine power.

Each sail, which could be lowered to fold along the side of the ship to allow cargo to be loaded and unloaded, would cover 800 square metres. This is 25 times the area of each of the sails used on the Solar Albatross, one of four similar passenger ferries Solar Sailor has now built for the Jockey Club.

However, Solar Albatross is the only one of the four vessels that has solar-equipped sails, which can be angled to the sun and wind direction. The three other ferries have solar cells mounted on the roof.

He said initial estimates showed that the four ferries, which can carry up to 100 people each, had cut the Jockey Club's fuels costs by half. Dane said the ferries would be monitored over the next year to assess the actual fuel savings.

Electric power from the solar cells is used for the five minutes when the ferries are arriving and departing Sai Kung and Kau Sai Chau, while the diesel engine is started for the 15-minute cruise.

Dane said the ferries can operate at six knots using electric power and 16 knots using diesel.

The diesel engine consumed about 10 litres of oil an hour. 'With solar power we can reduce that by a couple of litres. For us that's the critical thing - the fuel savings,' he said.

On their latest project, Dr Dane said by augmenting the cargo ship's diesel engines, the technology could save 20 to 40 per cent of fuel costs and pay for itself in as little as two years.

The trial, which would initially involve only one sail being fitted to one ship, will determine whether the technology could then be rolled out on a larger scale throughout the company's fleet.

SolarSail envisages several huge sails of 850 square metres each fitted to each carrier. The sails, which would cost about $7 million, could be folded away during loading and unloading.




by Sail-World Cruising round-up

  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=88054

11:54 PM Fri 2 Sep 2011 GMT






Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.


Related News Stories:

17 Apr 2014  HUD Vision: An interview with Afterguard Marine’s Alex Moret
01 Dec 2013  New free smartphone app for New Zealand sailors
28 Sep 2013  The magic of NOAS: coming to a marina near you - but not for a while
18 Sep 2013  Sailing space to discover new worlds
26 Jun 2013  Beneteau invites: Design your OWN Oceanis, just as you want it...
10 May 2013  New 'Penguin' semi-sub: explore under the sea without getting wet
02 Apr 2013  Harken, putting the 'jazzle' on board your sailing boat
27 Mar 2013  Sailing to be our space future as NASA's solar sail prepares to fly
26 Mar 2013  Hybrid project on Hallberg Rassy wins Royal Thames Mansura Trophy
22 Mar 2013  New tool in the war against Somali piracy
MORE STORIES ...

Cruising USA



You scratched my seagrass! by Steven Katona, Newport, RI














The Galley Guys take on the Vancouver International Boat Show by Greg Nicoll with Frank Leffelaar and Friends,


Are you ready to enter that marina? by Captain John Jamieson, Florida










Remember to properly dispose of obsolete distress beacons by Australian Maritime Safety Authority,




World ARC fleet bids farewell to Bali by World Cruising Club,














World ARC crews in Bali by World Cruising Club,


Could your sailing navigation use a tune-up? by Captain John Jamieson, Florida








The Boat Cookbook by BoatBooks,








World ARC fleet now arriving in Bali by World Cruising Club,


EU Naval flagship- frigate assist yacht twice maydays in pirate zone
An offer a Galley Guy cannot refuse
World ARC fleet to enter Indian Ocean for the first time
What can you do to prevent electrocution and ESD?
Pack this sailing gear for 'hands-free' lighting
Salty Dawg Rally Seminar Series planned October 8 in Annapolis
Europe tightens up on skippers competency certification
World ARC fleet departs Darwin under full sail
NOAA expedition discovers ship’s timepiece silent for nearly 200 years
Blue Planet Odyssey - Northwest Passage gate opens
A Cruising Guide to the Dominican Republic 6.0 now available
Africa Europe Challenge introduces 'Spectator's Package'
Niagara-on-the-Lake, a popular cruising destination in Canada
The crowd-pleasing comforts of catamaran cruising
'Sailing Stones' of Death Valley seen in action for the first time
20 coral species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act
A case of crossed wires? A shocking situation!
OHPRI Teen Summer Camps make a splash
How amazingly awe-inspiring the Arctic really is
Boaters urged to attend anchoring meetings next week in Florida
New atlas provides thorough audit of marine life in the Southern Ocean   
Canal Boating in the Alsace with the Galley Guys   
World ARC fleet arrives in Darwin   
Timeless Tonga - Charter sailing in a Polynesian paradise *Feature   
A fine conclusion to the ARC Baltic 2014   
Where in the world are our strongest corals?   
Incredible efforts to save yacht from being lost at sea   
ARC Baltic fleet visit six countries and six capitals in six weeks   
Helen Island, Palau -a beautiful and unique place   
Barnacle Busting   
From Penguins to Polar Bears   
Cornell turns back from the North West Passage   
Polar research: Six priorities for Antarctic science   
Missing German tourists in the hands of Abu Sayyaf Group   
NCI granted dedicated VHF Channel   
Positive news for cruising boats in Greece   
Bivalves' ability to clean chemicals from waterways   
Are You Sailing with 'Weak Links' in your sailing rigging?   
Week-long cruise turns into 16-year round-the-world voyage   
World ARC fleet cruising the Coral Coast   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph contact the photographer directly.
XLXL WAS Cru USA
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT