sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Boats for Sale MarineBusiness-World Sail-World Racing Cruising Int Magnetic Is RW Photo Gallery FishingBoating
Sail-World.com : Satellite imaging for search and rescue - coming of age
Satellite imaging for search and rescue - coming of age

'A catastrophic event may destroy all communications gear on board very rapidly'    .    Click Here to view large photo

Two leaders in the field of search and rescue have stated that it won't be long before satellite imaging is all part of the matrix when a sailing boat sounds an alarm or goes missing in the ocean - and this could make all the difference.

'Until now, it’s not been realistic to use such images in real time [for searches] unless you were a government agency,' Jeff Glickman, a nationally-recognized Seattle-area satellite image analyst, recently told Bruce Dorminey of Forbes. 'What’s changed in the last year is the development of certain polar orbiting commercial satellites capable of scanning the earth quickly. We’re at a tipping point where you could catch a water craft on an image at least once a day.'

In the news recently are two incidents to which this could apply - one fictional, one all too tragically real. In the film 'All is Lost', Robert Redford, sailing solo seventeen hundred miles off the Sumatran Straits, is hit by a drifting sea-land cargo container.

Although Redford manages to make three SOS calls, he’s soon forced to abandon ship.

While the causes of a real tragedy at sea - the demise of the Nina in the Tasman Sea - may never be known, something just as catastrophic may have happened to this fully-crewed, 70-foot American schooner.

But in such rare cases when all emergency communications fail, satellite imaging could now make the crucial search and rescue difference.

Nina in happier days -  .. .  
The story is well-known to Sail-World readers. With seven aboard, including six Americans, the Nina’s last confirmed, but undelivered satellite phone text message, stated that that the schooner had had its storm sails stripped away and was encountering 110 km/hour wind gusts and 8-meter ocean swells.

By then, the craft was estimated to be some 370 nautical miles West-North-West of Cape Reinga in the Tasman Sea, between Newcastle, Australia and Opua, New Zealand.

However, Maritime New Zealand’s Rescue Coordination Centre officially suspended its search after 12 days, which included covering some 737,000 sq. nautical miles with a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3 Orion aircraft.

Meanwhile, friends and families of Nina’s missing crew contacted DigitalGlobe DGI +0.85%. The U.S.-based satellite operator readily agreed to reposition its constellation of commercial satellites to collect high-resolution imagery of almost 500,000 square kilometers — an area larger than California. DigitalGlobe then used its recently-acquired Tomnod crowdsourcing online platform to aid in the search.

DigitalGlobe recruited thousands of online users to help sift through massive amounts of sat-photo images and tag anything that might look like the missing craft or its life raft.

An image taken September 16th by DigitalGlobe’s QuickBird satellite was flagged as potentially being the missing yacht by multiple Tomnod users.


The image was then sent to Maritime New Zealand where it was thoroughly analysed in terms of whether it would 'constitute sufficiently-compelling new information to resume active searching,' says Nigel Clifford, Maritime New Zealand’s General Manager for Safety and Response services, which oversaw search and rescue for the Nina. It was then determined, says Clifford, that the QuickBird photo isn’t likely to contain an image of the missing yacht.

'But given the elapsed time, survival under this scenario is most unlikely,' said Clifford. Sadly, by the time the images were seen by potential rescuers, the target would have drifted far from the sighted position.

Clifford notes that analytical image analysis technology has to be both highly effective and fast enough to beat the clock.

'All is Lost' only reinforces just how difficult open ocean search and rescue can be. Redford’s full-sized life raft passes within half a mile of two large cargo ships and even with flares still can’t get their attention.

Glickman says as long as the craft is still on the surface, by knowing its dimensions and the satellite that imaged it, analysts could quickly compute how the vessel would appear from low earth orbit. He adds that because satellite images are registered with geospatial coordinates, in principle, search agencies using them should then have precise new location data to work with.

Right now, satellite imagery is on the fringe when it comes to search and rescue. 'We run [some] 300 sea, air and land searches annually and satellite imagery would possibly be useful in one incident per year,' said Clifford. 'That said, even for this very rare usage, we are keen to access satellite imaging’s capabilities.'

Maybe not very effective today, but in the near future satellite imaging could be one more standard tool used by the search and rescue organisation searching for lost sailors.

Source article


by Bruce Dorminey, Forbes/Sail-World Cruising


  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=117093

3:38 AM Wed 27 Nov 2013GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.


Related News Stories:

25 Jan 2014  Safety authorities refuse further help to locate missing schooner Nina
25 Jan 2014  Downunder Safety authorities refuse help to find missing schooner Nina






Sail-World Cruising News - local and the World



Death by Dinghy by Allan Riches Brunei Bay Radio,








A case of crossed wires? A shocking situation! by Stuart Carruthers, RYA Cruising Manager,






Canal Boating in the Alsace with the Galley Guys by Greg Nicoll with John Armstrong,




World ARC fleet arrives in Darwin by World Cruising Club,






Dangers of the Dinghy trip back to your boat by Rob Kothe & the Sail-World Team,






Where in the world are our strongest corals? by Hanny Rivera - Cohen's Lab,






Barnacle Busting by Neil and Ley Langford,




Polar research: Six priorities for Antarctic science by Mahlon C. Kennicutt II and colleagues,
























Blue Planet Odyssey - Beset in Arctic Bay ice + Video
2014 National 4x4 Outdoors Show: Popularity of caravanning and camping
Last chance to join 2014 Multihull Solutions Whitsunday Rendezvous
Dangerous conditions for boaters from this evening
Garcia Yachts Exploration 45 - Jimmy Cornell's newest adventure
Sustainable Seafood - How to purchase with confidence
Risks to penguin populations continues
Dangerous conditions for boaters from this afternoon
ARC Baltic fleet head from Helsinki to Stockholm
Follow these tips when anchoring
Swedish couple rescued off Cook Islands
Elaine Fowler, RPAYC's first female life member elected
Refurbished Protector project 'better than buying new'
Galley Guys meet the Spice Lady
Discover science of maritime exploration at National Maritime Museum
Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club’s Jack Gale training centre born
Multihull Central launches Aquila range at SIBS *Feature
If all else fails read the instructions!!
ARC Baltic fleet cruising and anchoring in the Finnish archipelago
Phuket Yacht Show: new kid on the block taking on PIMEX? *Feature
Endangered species are like Movie Stars - Charlie Sheens and Tom Hanks   
Vanuatu Customs making life easier for visiting cruising yachts   
Multihull Central - Covering all the bases *Feature   
Baltic 4 Nations rally is now in full swing   
Flags at Sea, an infographic by John Tissott   
Cruising lessons from ocean racers   
Sydney International Boat Show - Day 2 *Feature   
Marine Rescue volunteers celebrate new unit and $120,000 vessel   
Procedures set out for waterborne visitors to Vanuatu   
17-year-old RNLI volunteer saves child in first rescue mission + Video   
Teen names latest RNLI Shannon class lifeboat in Poole + Video   
Fascinating opportunity with OceansWatch   
Pantaenius Insurance - being seen in yellow, green and orange *Feature   
Fake GPS signals detected when cruising the high seas   
Sydney International Boat Show - Changed conditions on Sydney Harbour   
Our new Cruising Editor editor remembers his first offshore adventure   
World Odyssey Race - Bringing back the Corinthian spirit   
Blue Planet Odyssey Rally - Raising climate change awareness   
Pacific Circuit Rally - 2015   
All Points Rally departs this November   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph, contact the photographer directly.
XLXL WAS Cru SH
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT