sail-world.com
 
 
News Home Boats for Sale MarineBusiness-World Sail-World Racing Cruising Int Magnetic Is RW Photo Gallery FishingBoating
Sail-World.com : Crossing the Tasman solo - this sailing voyage you DON'T want
Crossing the Tasman solo - this sailing voyage you DON'T want

'Lisa Blair in action'    .

Mooloolaba sailor Lisa Blair recently sailed a trans-Tasman solo yacht race as part of her preparation for her next, overriding goal - the solo circumnavigation of Antarctica in December this year. However, it's her description of her first solo crossing of the Tasman Sea from Australia to New Zealand that she has made into a gripping story. Wanting to solo sail somewhere across chancy oceans? Read this:

Lisa Blair’s loaned Van de Stadt 39 Cator of Margaret River -  .. .  
Being loaned the Van De Stadt 37 boat, Cator of Margaret River, by Roger McMillan of sailing emag MySailing only two weeks prior to setting out was a lucky break and very kind of Roger, but also part of the challenge as the boat needed much preparation for such an enterprise.

So it was with all of her frantic preparations done and customs cleared she sailed out of Pittwater Bay and aimed the boat East for New Zealand.


Finally there was the wind in my hair and the smell of salt air all around me. After two weeks of madness to get here it was so nice to be alone on a boat sailing for the horizon.

This is also my first solo ocean passage so it was properly just as well that I was so busy before the start so that I didn’t get the chance to think about the enormity of what laid ahead and as a red sunset bloomed across the sky on Sunday I set about settling in on my new home as we sailed on to the horizon. By nightfall I had cleared most of the shipping and the exhaustion of the last two weeks was starting to creep up on me however I have been very strict in keeping to my 20 minuet sleeping pattern. You see a ship beyond the horizon can reach you in just over 20 minuets so It is good to scan the horizon every 20 minuet to see if there are any ships near and as much as a long sleep would be welcome It will have to wait until landfall.

The night passed at a steady 6 knots with a gentile 12 knots of breeze to ease me into solo sailing. By day two the winds had dropped off to 3-5 knots slowing me down to a near stand still as a large high pressure system settled over me. This began to make sleep difficult as the sails would thrash back and forward in the swell making quite a racket and the auto helm would keep beeping at me as it lost the heading because there was simply no traction for it to steer with. When the boat would stall out completely I would start the engine and motor until I found wind however I soon discovered that the engine did not vent out of the boat very well as such the cabin would fill with exhaust fumes so I prudently would stay on deck while the engine was running and could often be found circled up on deck hugging my oven timer trying to sleep but fearing that I would sleep through my alarm due to the noise of the engine. Needless to say I am still trying to catch up on sleep.’

So it is that I have now been sailing solo at sea for 4 days and have almost 400nm and have not seen a ship for two days. I have found that I have taken to solo sailing like a duck to the water and feel completely at peace here alone on this great expanse of water. I am sure that this feeling is also due to the lovely sunny days and gentile breeze. It may change when I get my first storm alone however I somehow don’t think so.

My windless conditions lasted another 24 hours until a lovely 12-15 knots of breeze filled in. This amount of wind is perfect for this vessel and she lunged forward like a dog pulling on her lead making a steady 7 knots in the right direction. I was taking the safe approach and putting a reef (shorting sail) in the sail at night so that I was not caught out. On my fifth day at sea I also noticed that the bilges kept getting water in them. This is not a good problem on any boat and I was duly concerned however the problem did not get any worse during the trip and I put it down to water over the decks. This problem did seem to go away when the weather was good and the boat was not getting waves over the deck.

After a few days of isolation I was beginning to feel like I wouldn’t see anyone until I reached port when I went up on deck after yet another 20 minuet sleep to see container ship ANL BAREGA just coming over the horizon. I made radio contact just to say hi and to check that they had noticed me but they passed with a safe clearance to my starboard side. Also that afternoon my radar picked up a stationary object of some size just beyond the horizon. It was of no concern to me as I was already past it and sailing on but I sat there thinking for a while what exactly could be that size just floating in the middle of the Tasman Sea. I finished this day beating to windward with just over 500 nm to go.

Lisa Blair - determined to circumnavigate Antarctica solo -  .. .  
For the next two days I was getting some great condition if not enough wind and was maintaining 6 knots in the right direction. I was also getting lots of rest for my body even if I was still not getting any sleep longer than 20 minutes however I was beginning to get frustrated at the constant winds around the 5-8 knot range and was just wanting to be making good time again so I tacked south for a day in the hopes of picking up a bit more breeze.

On my seventh day at sea I phoned customs to notify them that I should be arriving in NZ within 48 hours as per the protocol and by that afternoon the winds had filled in to a healthy 15 knots and I was sailing along with 1 reef in the sail quite well but the barometer was still dropping so I was going to be in for a blow even if the forecast was for 20-25 knots at a max.

When the winds started to build to 20 knots I put in the second reef and furled some of the jib (the front sail) away and continued on. Initially the barometer showed a drop from 1022 to 1017 in 4 hours indicating a rather severe blow however after a few hours the barometer steadied and the winds once again returned back to below 10 knots.

By 12.30pm on day 8 I had 164nm to go and was beginning to dream of that long awaited sleep, hot showers as I still had not showered and a lovely hot meal however by 5pm the winds were building again and were at a 15 knots. At 10pm that night sailing with 2 reefs in the main I came on deck and was completing my log when I looked up at the main sail and noticed that a few sliders had popped off. These are the little plastic things that hold the sail to the mast as such the sail was adding extreme pressure on the other sliders and they too were breaking. My log only shows winds around 15-16 knot range so nothing dramatic but the damage was already done and I spent a lovely 3 hours trying to battle the winds to get this sail down and finally finished very cold and tired but with my main sail lashed securely to the boom. I ran through the night in building winds and building seas with the jib half furled and the engine on as I did not wish to attempt getting the storm tri sail up in heaving seas in the dark.

At 4.30 am on day 9 at sea I was getting 35 knots of wind and the seas were around the 20-25 foot range in height but ‘Cator of Margaret River’ was handling it nicely and riding over the swell like a champion. I got very little sleep that night as the swell was continuing to build and was very steep making for dangerous seas. I was also anticipating that the conditions would moderate in 8-12 hours however the little low decided to park right on top of me and the winds continued to build to a steady 40 knots by 8 am.

By this time I was needing to turn off the engine as I was worried about using too much fuel and not having enough to make harbour so I ate some muesli bars and chocolate and went out into the howling winds and driving rain to get the Storm Tri Sail up. This was no easy task and ended up taking around 3 hours with much swearing and most of the time was spent just trying to hold on as the boat crashed of the back of these enormous waves. Once I had completed this task I stopped to take stock of everything and looked over my shoulder to see a HUGE ship 500 meters away. I immediately got on the radio to check that they knew I was here and even got an update on the weather. The forecast said that I was to be in for another night with the winds easing in the morning. The seas were still building getting up to 40 foot in height at times when the sets would come through and were on par with the types of seas that you get in the southern Ocean, BIG seas. There is a very good reason for these seas as the sea floor goes from 3000 meters deep to 500 meters deep as it rises up onto a bank. This in turn causes horrendous seas and was right where I found myself to be during this storm. 10 minutes later as I looked over my other shoulder and there was a HUGE fishing ship trawling lines. I again got on the radio and they said that they had limited control due to the lines and that I will need to keep clear of them. Well I also had limited control but I did manage to put a tack in and keep clear.

My log reads at 5.30 pm that night: Had one hell of a night and day and still waiting to get to sleep. Been awake for 30 hours now. Very tired.’ The winds had held at 40 knots all day and the seas were beginning to break against the boat by this time causing me to become very worried about getting rolled, I had already had a couple of knock downs by this time putting the mast at 90 degrees and making a mess of the cabin.

I had spent the afternoon looking at way of making the boat safer in these conditions but I hadn’t yet used things like a para anchor or a drough so I didn’t know how the boat would react with these in use. My biggest problem was that I was only able to point the right angle into the waves so the boat was getting knocked sideways occasionally which is very dangerous in those seas. So I played the phone a friend card and called Bruce Arms who is to be my project Manager for my Antarctica campaign. After I told him of my current conditions he immediately suggested that I turn tail and run with the waves and stream out the storm drough. He also told me what to expect and the best way to set it up. So once again on deck to prepare the boat and with 40 nm to the finish I turned the boat around and went the opposite direction.

After turning around there was an immediate difference in the conditions and the boat was so much happier travelling at around 3 knots in the wrong direction with just a tissue of the jib out. I was still getting shoved by the big waves but the drough held the stern to the waves really well and prevented me from surfing at very fast speeds down these monsters. So after double checking that the boat was going to be fine I fell into an exhausted sleep for most of the night. I did set my timer to wake and check on everything however I slept right through it.

In the morning the winds had dropped off to 15-20 knots after over 40 hours in these conditions. I got the storm Tri sail up again and the drough in and started going back up wind to make port. I was blown 70nm further away from port over night and needed to beat to windward in the huge seas to get back. I was still making around 4 knots of speed with the storm tri sail and the jib but I couldn’t get any height to the wind. As a result I needed to do more tacks and sail a further distance.

At the end of day 10 I was really looking forward to a hot meal and heated one of my boil in the bag currys. I was finally relaxing and feeling great when there was a bang on deck and I could see the jib falling into the water. I rushed forward – clipped on of course and tried to retrieve the sail. With the boat getting blown sideways the jib went and wrapped its self around the bottom of the boat making it impossible to retrieve. I ended up having to gybe the boat around so that I was drifting away from the sail and then wrestle the sail back on board. I had very little energy to start with and this task zapped the last of my reserves so I was shaking with exhaustion by the time the sail was on deck and lashed a couple of hours later. I then managed to get the storm jib up and get back on course and a greatly reduced speed. I thought that the halyard had snapped initially however it was the webbing at the top that gave way. I at least had the optimistic view that at least this was the test run and not the race.

By 8am on after 11 days at sea I still had 54 nm to go and the winds continued to drop down to around the 10 knots range causing me to travel even slower, making speeds of around 1-2 knots. At least by this time the seas has calmed considerably. I left the boat in its slow state over night as I tried to get some rest however with my close proximity to land this was very difficult. In the morning I assessed the damage to the jib and ended up spending the morning sowing the webbing back on by hand so that I could at least make slightly better speed. By 2pm the sail was back up but not without its own struggles as I needed to run back and forward to feed the sail up the furler.

I had also taken stock of my fuel situation and decided to motor for a while to get out of the light winds as I was not getting any where fast as it was and I so desperately wanted to reach port that evening. By 6pm I had 15nm to go and was still motor sailing. By 7pm I has 10 nm to go and again was still motor sailing however I had decided to run the engine until the fuel tank was empty and then I had another 6 litres to add for the manovering into harbour.

By this time the sun was setting and there was a huge thunder storm that wanted to welcome me to NZ. Due to the amount of rain I still couldn’t see land and given that I had damaged the GPS onboard I was doing all of my navigation into port by plotting from the hand held GPS on the paper charts and getting headings ect. However just outside New Plymouth there is the sugar loaf islands and they finish right next to the harbour entrance so I was extremely paranoid about making an error in my plotting and ending up on the rocks as I has a visibility of around 100mtrs.

Finally the lighting and thunder moved off and the most welcome sight greeted my eyes. The lights of New Plymouth in New Zealand. By 9.15pm I was in harbour and getting ready to clear into customs. To do this I was directed to the main commercial wharf where I would need to drive between two cargo ships and tie up against another little boat at the end of the docks. Once all the paper work was sorted I radioed Harley who assisted me to my mooring and was very kind in taking me ashore for that much needed shower.

In reflection I am happy to have had the opportunity to test both the boat and myself in some heavy conditions and feel that I have not done too badly for my very first solo sail and in fact the very first time that I had to take this boat sailing and have now sailed 1200nm solo and completed the passage in 11 days, it would have been 8 days if I did not get caught by that Low however the trials of that storm were worth the extra time at sea.

Once again thank you so much for all the support and assistance offered by everyone.

About her Antarctic Challenge:
On December 14, Lisa hopes to celebrate her 30th birthday by sailing out of Albany, Western Australia to set a record-breaking course around Antarctica for 90 days. She wants to become the first woman to circumnavigate the frozen continent, solo, unaided and unassisted.

Only two men have performed the feat and she plans to shave 12 days off the 2008 record of Fedor Konyukhov, a Russian sailor .

Lisa reckons she can top his time for the 16,400 nautical mile Antarctic voyage by averaging 7.5 knots non-stop for three months. She says she might occasionally hit 28 knots with the teeth of the wind snapping at her stern and on a good day will churn through 300km of the world’s coldest, roughest water.

Good luck Lisa!


by Lisa Blair/Sail-World


  

Click on the FB Like link to post this story to your FB wall

http://www.sail-world.com/index.cfm?nid=122185

10:19 PM Thu 15 May 2014GMT


Click here for printer friendly version
Click here to send us feedback or comments about this story.







Sail-World Cruising News - local and the World

Just the thought of falling overboard scares most sailors into a 'stay-aboard-at-all-costs' mindset. And yet this most serious of sailing emergencies does happen now and then. Recovery will be tough no matter what the marine weather conditions. ... [more]  

The Cauden Basin in Port Louis has come alive with rally atmosphere over the last week. Transformed to a vibrant marina with yachts dressed overall, boat parties and welcoming new arrivals has made for a great spectacle and an exciting place to be. ... [more]  

Boyan Slat is a 20-year-old on a mission - to rid the planet's oceans of floating plastic. He has dedicated his teenage years to finding a way of collecting it. But can the system really work - and is there any point when so much new plastic waste is still flowing into the sea every day? ... [more]  

Tell me what self-respecting Galley Guy could possibly (while on the beautiful island of Barbados) turn down an opportunity to tour the famous Mount Gay Rum Distillery? For sure, not this Galley Guy! Sadly, the other Galley Guys did not get the call. ... [more]  

Discover Boating Week starts tomorrow by Boating Industry Association
Discover Boating Week is a celebration of the recreational boating lifestyle and the joys and fun that come with spending quality time on the water. Whether you're a fisherman, paddler or sailor, there is something for everyone. Over 40 events will be taking place across the state from October 18 - 25 and the best part is, they all absolutely free! ... [more]  

Boaters are reminded to keep clear of a section of Sydney Harbour on Sunday 26 October for the safe staging of The Australian Boat Race. ... [more]  

We are northwest of the southern peninsula of Haiti lying within radar range south of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and drifting in the current in the direction of Port-au-Prince at less than a knot. ... [more]  

Ian Broad and Ian Lindsay and their beloved Hood Sails in Sydney have become a sail making institution on the Australian scene. Established in 1971, Hood Sail makers (Aust.) P/L is 100% Australian owned and operated by the two Ian’s and it was the first Hood sail loft outside of the USA. This week we interviewed Broadie. ... [more]  

A flotilla of vessels will welcome home a Tauranga man as he sails the final stretch of a massive journey to become the first paraplegic to sail solo across the Pacific Ocean. Jonathan Martins faced his fair share of challenges during the past three years but will soon complete the record-making journey - nearly a year in the making. ... [more]  

As the Coastal Classic and general summer sailing draws closer this short video shows just how quickly someone can fall overboard. The incident happened within minutes of starting the Richmond Yacht Clubs Spring Regatta race around Rangitoto and Waiheke islands with reduced sails in 20 – 30kts of wind. ... [more]  

Boats recovery after Sydney storm by Roads and Maritime Services
Roads and Maritime Services Maritime Director Angus Mitchell said Roads and Maritime Services boating safety officers (BSO) had been busy since sunrise in Port Hacking helping with the recovery of more than 10 boats which broke their moorings overnight during stormy conditions. ... [more]  

Most boaters start the new boating season safely by Roads and Maritime Services
The results are in from the first boating campaign of the new season with a reminder for boaters to keep an eye on their speed and ensure they are aware of NSW lifejacket laws. ... [more]  

The 60ft Makayabella was stormed by elite members of the Irish Navy some 200 nautical miles off Mizen Head - Ireland's most southerly point - in the early hours of Tuesday, September 23rd. Five men, including the three onboard the yacht and another two in England, have been arrested and police are hunting for a sixth man in connection with the seizure. ... [more]  

A pearl among Gulf Islands parks, this sandy haven is ideal for hiking, beachcombing, birding, fishing…or just hanging. Sidney Spit is a park of superlatives. With the best sandy shores, the best sunsets, the best crabbing and some of the best hiking in the Gulf Islands, it’s no wonder it’s a hit with just about all who visit – for a few hours, a day or a week. ... [more]  

Vast, magnificent and remote, Prince William Sound offers the ultimate adventure for cruisers on North America’s West Coast. Few cruising boats visit beautiful and remote Prince William Sound. Some 2,800 square miles in area and situated at the very northern tip of the Gulf of Alaska, this inland sea has a coastline equal to that of Oregon and California combined. ... [more]  

Cast off on a cruise on someone else's boat and you'll want to remember to pack those basic essentials that form the foundation of your personal 'sailing ditty bag'. Each sailor will have their own ideas of the best gear to bring aboard. But here are some pieces of gear I've found to come in handy time and again, day after day. ... [more]  

This was our eleventh Malacca Straits passage, and it turned out to be just like some of the others - a pain in the neck. Keeping in mind that the boat hadn't been actively used for fifteen months, we started cautiously with a 40 mile passage from Singapore to Pulau Pisang. ... [more]  

To celebrate the start of the recreational boating season, Discover Boating Week will run from October 18 to 26. The public are invited to learn more about recreational boating through dozens of activities that have been organised by industry members and associated boating groups. ... [more]  

The Southern Spars team celebrates the company’s 25th year in operation with a continuous wave of innovation and ongoing expansion of its global operation. The company now employs 550 people worldwide with manufacturing or service facilities in New Zealand , South Africa, USA, Denmark, Sri Lanka and Spain. ... [more]  

The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) revealed in a peer-reviewed journal, PLoS One on October 9th that inshore reefs are particularly vulnerable to Ocean Acidification (OA)* on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). 'We found that inshore reefs were particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification (OA) during the wet season. ... [more]  

Estimating the diversity of life by Australian Institute of Marine Science
How many species are on Earth? Answering this simple question is not easy, but essential if we are to understand impacts of global change and manage environmental resources successfully. Without baseline knowledge of how many we have or what we have in different places, how do we know what we have lost, or might lose and how do we manage these natural resources to minimise extinctions? ... [more]  

A British couple was rescued off Spain's Almeria coast after their 21.6m yacht caught fire. The Coastguard and the 112 Emergency Coordination Service received several reports of a flare going up 12 nautical miles east of Carboneras at 11:30pm on Saturday. ... [more]  

We sail with just two crew most times, so it was amazing to visit a vessel with a ship's crew of 3000, plus another 3000 'passengers' being the various air wing teams deployed aboard. That's 6000 people on a ship that is 1000' long, and displaces 192,900 tons. ... [more]  

Nature’s Own founder Vaughan Bullivant had previously hoped to get around $65 million for the Daydream Island resort he paid $25 million for in 2000. But with his health deteriorating and the island failing to sell in two years, agents have convinced Mr Bullivant to lower his expectations — and the price — to about $30 million. ... [more]  

Update: Stunning finds from ancient Greek Shipwreck by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
The rescued antiquities include tableware, ship components, and a giant bronze spear that would have belonged to a life-sized warrior statue. The Antikythera wreck was first discovered in 1900 by sponge divers who were blown off course by a storm. ... [more]  

After sailing approximately 2350 nautical miles, the first of the World ARC fleet has arrived in Port Louis, Mauritius. Nexus, the 17.90 meter Semi Custom Catamaran skippered by Russell Owen, arrived today in the late afternoon. Completing the passage in 13 days, a warm welcome ashore greeted them with offerings of fruit and rum! ... [more]  

A new research project being run by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) with the support of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) and the Royal Yachting Association (RYA) is exploring attitudes towards risk and safety, and the various ways yacht sailors participate in their sport. ... [more]  

Rescue specialists from the State’s south will take to the water off Batemans Bay to search for four 'victims' missing at sea as part of a major capability exercise this Sunday, October 12. The search will be the culmination of a two-day regional Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREX) designed to test agencies’ marine search and rescue practices and coordination. ... [more]  

The Australian National Maritime Museum is delighted to announce that whale expert Geoffrey Ross from New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service will be joining the HMB Endeavour crew as a special guest when it embarks on a special whale-themed voyage from Sydney to Eden 27 - 31 October. ... [more]  

'Largest ever' U.S. Sailboat show cruises into Annapolis by Beth Crabtree, Correspondent, Capital Gazette
Each year the U.S. Sailboat Show draws to Annapolis nearly 50,000 attendees and the world's most prestigious sailboat manufacturers. Here you will find the newest luxury cruising yachts, sleek racing hulls, trailerable sailboats, and small sailing dinghies. For the first time, the show, which continues through Monday, includes previously owned boats in a separate section known as Brokerage Cove. ... [more]  

Will your lifelines pass this sailing test? by Captain John Jamieson, Florida
Most production sailboats have lifelines these days, but just how safe are they. Would they keep your sailing crew or partner, spouse or family members safe in all sailing weather-fair or foul? Put your lifelines to the test today with these five easy sailing tips. ... [more]  

The Commanders of the ‘Big Three’ international counter-piracy task forces met in Oman recently to discuss how they can best work together to deter and defeat criminals who use the sea lanes for illegal purposes. ... [more]  

Super Typhoon Vongfong reached sustained winds of 155 mph (250 km/h) this morning (Oct. 7), with gusts of up to 190 mph (306 km/h), according to the U.S Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ... [more]  

Royal Navy Commander tells of dramatic rescue in storm
Earth Wind Map - with typhoons
Unmanned aerial vehicle offers new view of killer whales
EU Naval Force strengthens ties in fight against piracy
Life on the Indian Ocean for the World ARC fleet
Kawau facilities get new lease of life - your chance to join new club
New equipment boosts NSW marine pollution response
TV awareness campaign calls on boaties to be safe on the water
Canadian shipwreck discovery solves 170-year-old mystery
British couple help stranded Syrian refugees to safety
Blue Planet Odyssey yacht completes Northwest Passage transit
Dredging of Swansea Channel gets underway
World ARC fleet embarks on leg 11, across the Indian Ocean
Pantaenius and Camper & Nicholsons Marinas become strategic partners
Auckland On The Water Boat Show: Images from the final day
Marine Wind Farms - coming to your cruising waters, what to do?
How to make a distance scale for faster navigation
Auckland On the Water Boat Show: World record mark set on Lancer SUP
Marine Rescue Forster Tuncurry recognised with Water Safety Week Award
Marine Rescue NSW wins 2014 NSW Water Safety Awards
New maps of the polar regions reveal unseen world beneath the ice   
Auckland On Water Boat Show: SUP record attempt Saturday afternoon   
Marine Rescue Point Danger assists disabled yacht to safety   
A win for sharks   
Seen on the water at the Auckland On The Water Boat Show   
New Zealand's largest on water boat show gets underway with big crowds   
Naval Commanders talk on-going piracy threat at sea   
RBT only applies when vessel is underway   
Predictwind and Iridium offer Sat Phone comms at Mobile Phone pricing   
EU Naval Force frigate, ESPS Navarra aids yacht in the Gulf of Aden   
Dinghy Sailing Instructor/Coach wanted for Canberra Yacht Club   
BRIG Navigator 700 – big boat for your buck   
A guide to steering without a rudder + Video - a must read and watch!!   
Portsmouth-based barge operator breaches maritime legislation   
You scratched my seagrass!   
Cocos Keeling Islands - Yet another paradise for the World ARC fleet   
Sailor texts girlfriend for help after yacht sinks in Bristol Channel   
Gas safety: don’t let it go off the boil   
Arctic sea ice summer minimum 2014: A scientific perspective   
Smiles on final day of Hamilton Island School Sailing Programme   


For this week's complete news stories select    Last 7 Days
   Search All News
For last month's complete news stories select    Last 30 Days
   Archive News







Sail-World.com  


















Switch Default Region to:

Social Media

Asia

Australia

Canada

Europe

New Zealand

United Kingdom


http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/Twitter_logo_small.png http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/FaceBook-icon.png  http://www.sail-world.com/event_images/image/RSS-Icon.png

United States

Cruising Northern

Cruising Southern

MarineBusiness World

PowerBoat World

FishingBoating World

 

Contact

Commercial

News

Search

Contact Us

Advertisers Information

Submit news/events

Search Stories/Text

Feedback

Advertisers Directory

Newsletter Archive

Photo Gallery

 

Banner Advertising Details

Newsletter Subscribe

Video Gallery

Policies

 

 

 

Privacy Policy

 

 


Cookie Policy

 

 



This site and its contents are © Copyright TetraMedia and/or the original author, photographer etc. All Rights Reserved.  Photographs are copyright by law.  If you wish to use or buy a photograph, contact the photographer directly.
XLXL NEW Cru SH
LocalAds   DE  ES  FR  IT