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Yacht of the Week- Moody 41

by Des Ryan on 7 Apr 2014
Moody 41 classic SW
As cruising boats as well as racing yachts get faster, glitzier and, above all, longer, there are still those of us who want the yacht we sail to be elegant rather than glitzy, fast enough but not to the exclusion of comfort, and a size that is 'just right' for short-handed sailing rather than as long as you can afford. Enter the Moody 41, our yacht of the week.

So the brief is towards safety and seaworthiness, to strength, power and a good design, to best performance yet not sacrificing comfort of the living spaces.

In short this is a timeless, elegant yacht to bring pleasure for years to come.

The back story of the Moody is an interesting one:

The original John Moody fell in love with boats as a young child and built boats in the courtyard of a house in the UK. When he died way back in 1880, he left his business to his son Alexander who continued to build dinghies and fishing boats. It wasn't until 1934 that his grandson (Alexander Herbert) decided to start building yachts. Before laying down the first keel, he wrote that his intention was that Moody Yachts were to be of only the highest quality materials and workmanship.

Moody yachts continue today to be 'island built' in a stand alone factory. This means that one team work on each yacht from start to finish. In this way skilled workers take control of the project and have great pride in the quality of the finished yacht.

Times move on, and it is Bill Dixon who has been designing Moodys since 1981. He uses his great store of tradition and experience but also pays close attention to modern advances in technology and production processes.

In 2007, Moody's decided that they needed to update their technology, and made a partnership with the Hanse Group.
This means the process is now almost entirely automatic and accurate to the millimetre… and of course significantly faster than before.

This has given them the winning combination of traditional skills and experience with progressive technology and innovative yacht design.



Birgit Schnasse and Design Unlimited are today responsible for the fabulous Moody yacht interiors. They push yacht interior design to another level combining traditional styling and attention to detail with today’s advanced technology.

You’ll find Moody interiors are well thought out, luxurious and comfortable, adhering to Herbert Alexander Moody's desire for 'highest quality materials and workmanship.'

So more than anything the Moody 41 represents the spirit of a golden age of yachting whilst being completely up to date in terms of performance and comfort.

The self-tacking headsail and lead aft lines makes sailing short handed a breeze.

The twin wheel steering position and curved glass windscreen give you excellent visibility at the helm. Well-cut sails are standard and drive the Moody effortlessly.



She features powerful winches, halyard, jib and mainsheet ball bearing blocks, as well as substantial chainplate fittings, cleats and fairleads.

Two large Lazarette lockers will easily accommodate all the yachts extra equipment.

Principal Specifications:

Length Overall : 12.70m
Length waterline : 10.90m
Beam : 4.00m
Draft : 2.0m or 1.65m
Displacement : 9.8 tonnes (approx)
Fuel capacity : 140 litres
Water capacity: 320 litres
Design : Dixon Yacht Design/Watervision
Interior stylist : Design Unlimited

To find out where you can access the nearest Moody boat dealer and learn more, contact the Australian and New Zealand dealers:

Australia:
Windcraft-Bayview Anchorage Marina
Peter Hrones
Suite 2, 1714 Pittwater Rd
NSW-2104 Bayview
tel: +61-2-99 79 1709
fax: +61-2-99 79 2027
email: peter@windcraft.com.au
website: http://www.windcraftmoody.com

New Zealand:
Windcraft New Zealand Limited
Dominic Lowe
9 Westhaven Drive
1010 Auckland / Westhaven
tel: +64 (9) 413 9465
fax: +64 (9) 4139465
email: boats@windcraft.co.nz
website: http://www.windcraft.co.nz

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