Please select your home edition
Edition
Barz Optics - Melanin Lenses

Route des Princes - MOD70, Maxi80 and Multi50 winners decided

by Sabina Mollart Rogerson on 1 Jul 2013
2013 Route des Prince fleet on the Bay of Morlaix © Mark Lloyd http://www.lloyd-images.com
In the 2013 Route des Princes, there were parties on June 9 in Valencia, the MOD70 and Maxi80 then Multi50s have completed their tour of Europe land on Sunday afternoon in the Bay of Morlaix, having swallowed respectively 2450 and 2310 miles between Spain, Portugal, Ireland, England and France.

In each class, the fight was beautiful and it was not until the outcome of the fourth and final stage offshore to know the names of the winners of the event. In MOD70 is finally Edmond de Rothschild, Imperial at the races in the first onshore and offshore in the last act between Plymouth and Roscoff, which rises on the highest step of the podium. As for Multi50s is Arkema - Aquitaine Lalou Roucayrol which rises on the highest step of the podium after an incredible three-way battle throughout the course.

After 2450 miles of offshore racing, linking Valencia to Roscoff on the Bay of Morlaix via Lisbon, Dún Laoghaire and Plymouth and 16 inshore short course contests of which they won nine, Edmond de Rothschild are winners of the MOD70 class on the inaugural Route des Princes multihull race around Europe.

Skippered by Sébastien Josse, the Edmond de Rothschild crew won the crucial Leg 4 bonus points at the Roche Gautier mark this morning and then made sure of their overall race victory when they finished first across the finish line of the last offshore stage, the short sprint from Plymouth which started yesterday evening.

In the Multi50 class, the combination of second place into Morlaix and winning the bonus points on the last leg, was enough for Lalou Roucayrol’s Arkéma - Aquitaine Region to take overall victory on the first major race outing for the fleet’s newest Multi 50.

Edmond de Rothschild reigned supreme inshore, winning all the short course regattas contested, in Valencia, Lisbon and Plymouth. Leading by four points going into this final leg, ahead of the Sidney Gavignet skippered Oman Air-Musandam, the key to their overall win was to make sure of winning the 1.5 bonus points granted to the class leaders at the Roche Gautier mark this morning. That all but put victory out of reach of Oman Air-Musandam.

Just as the MOD70 race went to the wire, so also did the Multi5o class but theirs was a three cornered fight for the overall class win. Arkéma - Aquitaine Region’s second place finish this afternoon, added to their points bounty for being first to the scoring mark this morning, ensured they top the podium by 2.5 pts ahead of Erwan Le Roux’s FenêtréA-Cardinal which won the final leg, Plymouth to Morlaix today. The Multi50’s raced 2310 miles over their four offshore stages. Arkéma - Aquitaine Region won the first leg into Lisbon, finished third into Dún Laoghaire, second into Plymouth and second into Morlaix. And at three of the four bonus points opportunities it was Roucayrol’s team which pocketed the points.

Starting last night in Plymouth Edmond de Rothschild had a 4pts lead after winning the final inshores series, that meant Oman Air-Musandam – ideally – needed to win the bonus and win the leg. They lead Edmond de Rothschild but were never able to extend and as they ran across the channel from Wolf Rock to the Roche Gautier mark, Josse’s crew got to the east and were able to extend slightly.

And so as the MOD70’s docked in the new Bloscon Marina in Roscoff the satisfaction was obvious on the face of skipper Josse, whilst Gavignet – correspondingly could not conceal his disappointment. The loss of small points here and there since the 9th June start, was Oman Air-Musandam’s downfall, not least being taxed four points in the protest room in Dun Laoghaire from a relatively innocuous Lisbon start line incident with Spindrift. Josse’s final satisfaction – leading a team stacked with offshore talent and less multihull experience– was to cap their overall victory with an offshore triumph.

'It was a real motivation to finish with no excuses, to win the overall and the last leg.' Said Josse, ' It was a pressure to win the offshore leg. It was frustrating for us because we are offshore sailors. When you see the CV’s there are 15 Figaros, Orange Round the World with Florent Chastel, the Trophy Jules Verne, the Volvo Ocean Race but we never won an offshore leg, until now. We won the inshores and so something felt a bit wrong. So now we are pleased to have won one offshore leg.

Gavignet concluded: 'It is not just down to this last race, it is down to many points that we missed out or lost through the race, here and there. That part of the story of this race has been painful since the start of the race and it is still painful.'


Final standings Route des Princes

MULTI50

1-Arkema-Région Aquitaine, Lalou Ruycorel, 140,5 pts
2-FenêtréA-Cardinal, Erwan Le Roux, 138 pts
3-Actual, Yves le Blevec, 138 pts
4- Rennes Métropole – Saint-Malo Agglomération, 105 pts

ULTIME
1-Prince de Bretagne, Lionel Limonchel, 166,5 pts

MOD70
1-Edmond de Rothschild, Sébastian Josse 167.5 pts
2-Oman Air – Musandam, Sidney Gavignet, 159pts
3-Spindrift, Yann Guichard, 147pts
4-Virbac-Paprec, Jean-Pierre Dick, 128 pts

Lalou Roucayrol, FRA, Arkéma - Région Aquitaine: 'We had a great run under gennaker between Eddystone and Minquier and really it was fun making 17-18 knots in the fog. It was the best sailing by feel, it felt like we were flying and we really were flying. And that let us get up with everybody again after we got stuck a bit of the start line. We got into the race and got passed them one by one. We passed the Minquier buoy in the lead to get the 1.5pts and then got ourselves into light winds and a bit of sea and it was tough then, but we stalled as little then and Erwan Le Roux got through us into the lead. In fact there was no significant chance to get back at them after that. We decided to stay close to the coast but were fighting the current, tacking with the Code Zero at ten metres off the rocks. It was difficult.

But it is the first event for the boat and the first big win. In total it a great reward for the 17 months of building and 22,000 hours of work. We are absolutely delighted to win, we are on cloud nine really. At the start we felt like we were just going on a training race to learn the boat and so on and here we are winning it. We were not expecting this. This is the result of a lot of hard work by many people. It is really incredible.'

Erwan Le Roux (FenêtréA-Cardinal): 'On this fourth offshore leg I think we had something close to the perfect race. We had to go for it and that’s really what we did. We did well out of Plymouth and attacked on the downwind to Minquiers with a lot of confidence, a little bit ahead of the other guys. But late at night we saw Lalou (Roucayrol) coming up on us, going like a rocket. I think the boat is made for going downwind and we could not do much against them. He did not miss much and managed to steal that infernal bonus points which would have allowed us the chance to win overall. But we did get back at him to win the leg, even if we could not win the Route des Princes overall. We did want to win the leg and pushed it close to the rocks to get out of the current. We did everything that we could. It was nice. I think we showed a good approach and I am very proud of my team. Anyway I am happy for Lalou. His is the new boat in the class and it has been good for him and his sponsors for sure. We kind of feel for Yves Le Blévec who has finished up third, but we will console him together.'

Sébastien Josse, FRA, Edmond de Rothschild: 'It is a good feeling to have won. I said before the start we had something to prove on this leg and we did it. So we were all very happy when crossed the finish line. There was a lot of satisfaction to have won offshore. We made a poor start. After that we stayed really calm on board and just concentrated on working hard. We had four people on the deck all night with no rest. And we just worked to close the gap with Oman and then took the lead. We just got past them when we are in contact with them this morning and pushed them a little bit more and we got to build a gap again. After that it is team work.

I am happy. I probably don’t realise how happy at the moment, it will sink in. It is cool to win the Routes des Princes because I know we have a good crew. We missed out on some result last year. Last year we had the potential but my crew were not multihull sailors. They are younger guys with no big CV in multihull sailing, but the deal was to make the team and grow up together over two years. Last year we did some good things right like the Krys Ocean Race Transat and not so well on the Tour de Europe. This year we know the boat, we have confidence in each other, we have confidence in the shore team. It is a really good. I am really proud because I know that when I made this team it was a good team. But it takes time to grow up together.

It was a real motivation to finish with no excuses, to win the overall and the last leg. On the water there are a lot of things can happen, you can lose the feeling, we lost that less than others and we won the leg.

It was a pressure to win the offshore leg. It was frustrating for us because we are offshore sailors. When you see the CV’s there are 15 Figaros, Orange Round the World with Florent Chastel, the Trophy Jules Verne, the Volvo Ocean Race but we never won and offshore leg, until now. We won the inshores and so something felt a bit wrong. So now we are pleased to have won one offshore leg.


Sidney Gavignet, FRA (Oman Air-Musandam): 'I am feeling a little better than ten minutes ago, better already but I am very disappointed to have come so close to winning but to finish second. It is not just down to this last race, it is down to many points that we missed out or lost through the race, here and there. That part of the story of this race has been painful since the start of the race and it is still painful.

We could have made some better navigation. It was pretty good, but sometimes you have a plan and you don’t execute. We could have done that better on this leg, that is down to confidence as well. You have to be confident to execute your plans.

Our plan was to move to the east of the others on the leg from Wolf Rock and Edmond de Rothschild did that well. We were very close during the night, at two boat lengths, but we could not execute to get to their east. They did. There was more wind there. This positioning, only half a mile, and little by little they got away.

On the inshores we could have been better, for sure. Though all my racing life I have been a poor starter and I feel we are better there. I think we made some good starts which is a result of hard work, but then we did not sail well. On the inshores the other teams are better for having big guys and tacticians for example and for us we don’t improve. We sail better with six than with eight. That is life, I am not complaining.'

Jean-Pierre Dick (Virbac-Paprec 70): 'We got close to Wolf Rock last night and it was a bit stormy and unpleasant and we had a few little suprises. From there we took a bit of a tack which was not so good and cost us. But we came back at Oman Air-Musandam on the downwind and were only seconds behind them at the Roche Gautier mark. But overall it is disappointing to finish third, but we have been close with some of the best names in the game and sailed in contact with them. But then Paris was not built in a day. It will take some time. We have learned a lot. In the transitions we still lack some fluidity and lost a little ground here and there, but hey that is small details. We are a bit disappointed to finish third, but we will move on Route des Princes website

Doyle Sails NZ - Never Look BackT Clewring J-classBarz Optics - Kids range

Related Articles

America's Cup - Arbitration Panel Hearing over Kiwi Qualifier for July
ACEA CEO, Russell Coutts has confirmed that the Arbitration Panel will hold its first Hearing in July. In a yet to be published interview in Sail-World, America’s Cup Events Authority CEO, Russell Coutts has confirmed that the Arbitration Panel will hold its first Hearing in July. This is the first official indication that the three person Arbitration Panel had even been formed, however Sail-World’s sources indicated that it had been empanelled since last January, possibly earlier.
Posted on 27 May
Rio 2016 - The Qualification Games - Part 2
Yachting NZ's refusal to nominate in three classes won in the first round of 2016 Olympic Qualification is unprecedented Yachting New Zealand's refusal to nominate in three classes won in the first round of 2016 Olympic Qualification is without precedent. Subject to Appeal, the Kiwis have signaled that they will reject 30% of the positions gained in the ISAF World Sailing Championships in Santander in 2014.
Posted on 22 May
Gladwell's Line - World Sailing changes tack after IOC windshift
Over the past year, we've given the International Sailing Federation (now re-badged as World Sailing) a bit of stick Over the past year, we've given the International Sailing Federation (now re-badged as World Sailing) a bit of stick. Every blow well earned over issues such as the pollution at Rio, the Israeli exclusion abomination plus a few more. But now World Sailing is getting it right.
Posted on 21 May
Rio 2016 - The Qualification Games - Part 1
Antipodean selection shenanigans aside, the Qualification system for the Rio Olympics appears to be achieving its goals Antipodean selection shenanigans aside, the Qualification system for the Rio Olympics appears to be achieving goals set in the Olympic Commission report of 2010. Around 64 countries are expected to be represented in Rio de Janeiro in August. That is a slight increase on Qingdao and Weymouth, but more importantly a full regional qualification system is now in place
Posted on 19 May
Taming the beast-a conversation with Stuart Meurer of Parker Hannifin
While AC72 cats were fast, they difficult to control, so Oracle partnered with Parker Hannifin to innovate a better way. If you watched videos of the AC72s racing in the 34th America’s Cup (2013), you’re familiar with the mind-boggling speeds that are possible when wingsail-powered catamarans switch from displacement sailing to foiling mode. While foiling is fast, there’s no disguising the platform’s inherent instability. Now, Oracle Team USA has teamed up with Parker Hannifin to innovate a better way.
Posted on 18 May
From foiling Moths to Olympic starting lines-a Q&A with Bora Gulari
Bora Gulari’s is representing the USA at the Rio 2016 Olympics in the Nacra 17 class, along with teammate Louisa Chafee. Bora Gulari (USA) has made a strong name for himself within high-performance sailing circles, with wins at the 2009 and 2013 Moth Worlds. In between, he broke the 30-knort barrier and was the 2009 US SAILING Rolex Yachtsman of the Year. His latest challenge is representing the USA at the Rio 2016 Olympics in the Nacra 17 class as skipper, along with his teammate Louisa Chafee.
Posted on 12 May
Concern for Zika at Rio Olympics is now deadly serious
Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, or the Rio Olympics. Many others have, and they were apt, but things have changed. So here now we have a situation where one man, Associate Professor Amir Attaran, who does have a more than decent string of letters after his name, is bringing nearly as many facts to bear as references at the article's end
Posted on 12 May
The importance of being Alive
Since buying the stunningly pretty Reichel-Pugh canting keel 66-footer, and re-naming her Alive, Since buying the stunningly pretty Reichel-Pugh canting keel 66-footer, and re-naming her Alive, the team have lined up for a lot of things, won plenty and nabbed a record, as well. She’s presently in a yard in the Philippines having a minor refit in readiness for the Australian season. It will commence with the upcoming Brisbane to Keppel and then head sharply into this year’s Hobart.
Posted on 10 May
Hoisted on their own petard
Now it was not that long ago that we wondered if there were some genuinely Shakespearean elements beginning to appear... Now it was not that long ago that we wondered if there were some genuinely Shakespearean elements beginning to appear in World Sailing’s premier event, the Sailing World Cup. In that time, a flurry of material has espoused all manner of joyous points including travel grants and prize money. That’s terrific and the hope is that somehow this will overcome the tyranny of distance for Melbourne
Posted on 9 May
Zhik - The brand born of a notion, not its history
here is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline is officially marketed as Made For Water There is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline has been officially marketed as Made For Water, and this is precisely what the company has done for the last eight years before the succinct and apt strapline came from out of R&D and into mainstream visibility.
Posted on 8 May