Please select your home edition
Edition
Festival of Sails 2017

Delta Lloyd North Sea Regatta - An exciting fight at the top

by Diana Bogaards on 20 May 2013
Heemskerk/Tentij scoring bullets in the F18 class Sander van der Borch © http://www.sandervanderborch.com
The third day of the Delta Lloyd North Sea Regatta showed in some classes an exciting fight at the top, resulting in new leaders. Front-runners in other classes consolidated their first position. It was a good sailing day with sunshine an a little more wind than predicted. This morning, the breeze came from the Northeast with some ten knots. In the course of the day and according to the weather forecast, it turned to the North and picked up.

Rescue boats had a busy day on the catamaran and One Design courses. A few Javelins and Contenders capsized and one cat sailor fell overboard. He was quickly rescued and brought back to his boat. The chilly easterly winds in combination with the cold water made the tiring conditions for competitors. At the end of the day, however, the sailors returned tired but satisfied to the harbour. Tomorrow is the last racing day. The IRC and ORC classes will sail a long course, that counts for the overall results. Fleet races are scheduled for the other classes.


The Soulmate of Leon Westhoeve took over the lead from the Skarp in the ORC1, but things did not go smoothly today. 'It was a stressful day', says Westhoeve. 'Just before the first gun, our mainsail ripped from the front to the back. Normally we have our car with all spare sails parked on the quay, but because my wife is heavily pregnant, she has the car at home. We therefore acted very quickly. I called and asked her to bring the mainsail and in the meantime we rushed to the harbour. Possible speeding tickets did not matter me. Dressed in our sailing gear we ran to the entrance of the regatta village, got her in and threw the sail on board. Off we went. It looked like a Le Mansstart. We were just in time for the second race. Because we had missed the first one, we had no discard anymore, so it was make or break for the rest of the day. Luckily we sailed two bullets again. We have a high boat speed and good handling. There are some technical sailors on board, who can trim the most out of the boat. But even though we score wins, we learn every match again. We took no risks in today's last race. We were leading and simply hoisted the storm spinnaker, because we did not want to make mistakes.'

The Schaap Shipcare of Dirk Jan Verdoorn shows in the ORC3-4 class a constant series of bullets, but sailed today also a twentieth place. The reason was a new windward mark, which was laid during the race due to a big wind shift of some thirty degrees. 'We couldn't find it', says Verdoorn laughing. 'It was a black buoy and that one isn't easy to find on the water. Finally we had to bear away a lot to round it. The whole top of the ranking finished almost last in that race. The boats behind us could see the mark better due to our new course and were suddenly in the lead. Luckily it is our discard and are we still first overall. We have a team, which sails together for some years now. Everybody takes it very seriously; we train a lot and can tune the boat very well. For instance we can gibe as many times as we like without loosing speed, that is different from a lot of boats. It doesn't matter if we have light or heavy weather. The boat planes in strong conditions, which is nice for a keel boat.'


In the F18 class Mischa Heemskerk and Bastiaan Tentij are doing good business. After nine races they are in the lead with three bullets and as a worst result a ninth place, which can serve as a discard. 'We have a new set of sails on the boat', says Tentij, 'and that is one of the best sets we ever had. The spinnaker is like a rocket, downwind we are not to be stopped. Last year we had a bad season and some problems, which we solved this winter. From now on we can be competitive again. The conditions were fantastic today, but it also was a difficult day with a lot of waves. In the last race we had to deal with many wind holes and therefore it was difficult to sail the boat in a straight line and to keep up the speed continuously. Tomorrow we have three more races. I hope it will be the same as today. We are all round, so we can also sail well with light wind, but it just is fun to have a big breeze.'

On the last night of the festivities the sailors could still enjoy the North Sea Kitchen and live music of Captain Midnight Live Band. Tomorrow will be the last day of the Delta Lloyd North Sea Results here Delta Lloyd North Sea Regatta

Barz Optics - FloatersJeanneau Sunfast 660x82Henri Lloyd 50 Years

Related Articles

Vendee Globe - Le Cleac'h flying home
Vendee Globe race leader Armel Le Cleac's is on the final tack for the finish of the 2016/17 Vendee Globe Race. Vendee Globe race leader Armel Le Cleac's is on the final tack for the finish of the 2016/17 Vendee Globe Race. At the 0400UTC position report he had 145nm to sail to the finish at Les Sables D'Olonne and was expected to be greeted by a crowd of hundreds of thousands of French sailing fans on Thursday afternoon or early evening local time.
Posted today at 7:14 am
Le Cléac'h closes in on Vendée Globe finish line
French sailor Armel Le Cléac'h has one hand on the Vendée Globe trophy this morning as he bears down on the finish line French sailor Armel Le Cléac'h has one hand on the Vendée Globe trophy this morning as he bears down on the finish line in Les Sables d'Olonne, France. At the latest position update Le Cléac'h, skipper of Banque Populaire VIII, was 146 nautical miles from finishing the solo round the world race with a lead of 87nm over second-placed Alex Thomson.
Posted today at 6:05 am
Jules Verne Trophy - The charm of the tropics
IDEC Sport is less than 1000 miles from entering the Northern Hemisphere. IDEC Sport is less than 1000 miles from entering the Northern Hemisphere. At 17°S this morning, the big red and grey trimaran is climbing back up the Atlantic pushed along by the Brazilian trade winds, which are allowing Francis Joyon and his men to keep up an average of 25 knots as they continue in their attempt to grab the Jules Verne Trophy.
Posted today at 5:13 am
Vendee Globe Race - View the finish live
The arrival of the Vendée Globe will be broadcast LIVE on January 19 between 5.30 p.m and 8.00 p.m (GMT) French skipper Armel Le Cléac'h and British skipper Alex Thomson will finish their non-stop solo round the world race on Thursday afternoon or evening local time. The arrival of the Vendée Globe will be broadcast LIVE on January 19 between 5.30 p.m and 8.00 p.m (GMT) on the event's channel
Posted today at 5:10 am
Vendee Globe - Both leaders tack setting up an intense finish battle
According to the official tracker, Vendee Globe Race leader, Armel Le Cleac'h has tacked in what could be the final move According to the official tracker, Vendee Globe Race leader, Armel Le Cleac'h has tacked in what could be the final move of the Vendee Globe race for 2016/17. Rival Alex Thomson has responded. At the latest report, the French sailor was attempting to cross ahead of his rival, Alex Thomson - who still had the option to tack underneath and then take his chances on the final 24 hours.
Posted on 18 Jan
Day 74 – Vendée Globe victory 24 hours from Le Cléac'h's grasp
British sailor Alex Thomson conceded that his chances of overhauling leader Armel LeCléac'h on the home strait were slim Alex Thomson today conceded that his chances of overhauling leader Armel Le Cléac'h on the home strait were slim, despite narrowing the gap to just 35 miles. In the last 24 hours Thomson, 42, has halved Le Cléach's lead of 70 miles but as the pair prepared to enter the final 300 miles of the solo round the world race this afternoon he said the advantage was now firmly with his French rival.
Posted on 18 Jan
Former Clipper Race skipper chasing Vendèe Globe glory
Alex, 42 from Gosport, made up 30nm on his French rival Armel le Clèac’h overnight to cut the deficit to around 40nm After more than 70 days, the Vendee Globe is set for an epic finish, with the youngest skipper to win the Clipper Race, Alex Thomson, closing in on the lead as the race enters into the final 24 hours. Alex, 42 from Gosport, made up 30 nautical miles on his French rival Armel le Clèac’h overnight to cut the deficit to around 40nm by Wednesday morning.
Posted on 18 Jan
Australian Finn Championships images by Dinghy Fever Photography
With so many British flags the casual observer could be forgiven for thinking there was a colonial uprising taking place With so many sails sporting British or Australian flags the casual observer could be forgiven for thinking there was some kind of colonial uprising taking place on the water.
Posted on 18 Jan
Vendée2020Vision sailors inspired by Alex Thomson’s performance
The aim of Vendée2020Vision is to help progress these sailors up to the next rung of the ladder. To help them with their fund raising, Vendée2020Vision sailors last year had the opportunity to take part in 12 bespoke training modules.
Posted on 18 Jan
Inaugural GC32 Championship coming up next month
A joint gathering of the international fleets of GC32 one design foiling catamarans is to take place in Muscat This will be the first occasion ever that the GC32 Racing Tour and the Extreme Sailing Series™ fleets have combined to lock horns on the race course.
Posted on 18 Jan