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Product of the Week- A radar reflector for your grab bag

by Lee Mylchreest on 25 Jul 2012
Echomax 230I - suitable for dinghies or liferafts .. .
What about a radar reflector for your grab bag? We all go to sea preparing a grab bag in the hope the we will never have to use it, but if the worst ever happens you might be glad that a radar reflector will locate your position to passing vessels, especially at night or in bad weather. This tiny but effective radar reflector is amazingly light because it is inflatable.

The Echomax 230I consists of a DuPont metallized, lacquered and spunbonded fabric array with PVC case. It folds down neatly to pocket size and is an ideal addition to the grab bag for emergency use.

The testing facilities of QinetiQ, a world leader in research and testing, recorded an astonishing 17m² peak exceeding the RORC requirements by nearly two fold.

It can be mounted from halyard or there is an optional three piece glass fibre rod kit for dinghy or liferaft use. It is also available with fluorescent green cover.

In storm conditions the unit can be deployed in the apex of the liferaft, or deflated.

Dimensions:
Length: 750mm
Weight: 413 gms (14 ounces)
Overall Diameter: 300mm
3 piece mounting kit: 247gms

NB: The glass fibre rod fixing kit is an optional extra and is not supplied with the inflatable. A price for this set can be obtained from the dealer.

If your local marine store cannot supply the Echomax 230I you can find out where to purchase it by http://www.echomax.co.uk/Echomax_Dealers.htm!clicking_here.
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