Please select your home edition
Edition
Sailing Raceboats 2016/17 RS Feva 728x90

'New Era' as Indonesia welcomes yachts up to three years

by Sail-World Cruising round-up on 13 Dec 2011
Sailing beautiful Indonesia - now easier .. .
Could it become as popular as Thailand? A meeting between a superyacht organisation and an Indonesian Head of Customs confirms the willingness of Indonesia authorities to welcome cruising yachts to their country, which has long been infamous for expense and bureaucratic difficulty to obtain permission to cruise the extraordinary coastline.

In the meeting, which took place on 8 December 2011 in Bali, between Asia Pacific Superyachts (APS) Indonesia and Ms Nyoman Rini, Head of Customs for Benoa Harbour, Ms Rini gave her full support to the new Indonesia PIB regulations (Temporary Import Documentation), welcoming in a new era for yachts visiting Indonesia.

Under the old laws, a boat could be made to pay a ‘Bond’ to Customs to ensure no commercial ventures were undertaken while they visited Indonesia. The terms of this – notably the return of said bond on departure - were unclear and many captains and owners were put off by the ‘Bond’ and conditions. But as of the 3 December, the Bond is no longer necessary and the role of Customs in dealing with inbound vessels has been minimized.

APS has always maintained a close working relationship with the Customs departments around Indonesia to find amicable solutions for the many yachts they service in Indonesia each year. In moving forward to talk about the new regulations with the new face of Benoa Customs, APS GM Richard Lofthouse met with Ms Rini to discuss her understanding of the new attitude towards visiting yachts and how it would affect APS clients in 2012.

The GM reports Ms Rini exudes Balinese charm and has a positive outlook and attitude. He noted she is friendly and well versed in the rules and regulations and was quick to acknowledge the role APS plays in bringing many foreign yachts into Indonesia, including, in 2011 the two biggest motor yachts and the biggest sailing yacht to visit the country. Ms Rini made it clear that her role as Head of Customs was to help grow the number of visiting yachts by minimizing Customs interference with inbound vessels.

Ms Rini stressed that the main role of Customs was to ensure that visiting yachts were not operating commercially, nor bringing goods (contraband or otherwise) into the country for commercial gain. However, unlike in the past only a letter of guarantee from a representative of the vessel is required and talk of a bond is consigned to the dustbin of history.

Also encouraging was her reinforcement of the new rule which allows the boat to make PIB (temporary import) in first port of call and subsequently make PEB (export) at last port of call. Formerly, this could all only happen at the port of entry, making it highly restrictive to a vessel’s movements. By allowing the import and export to happen anywhere in Indonesia, this change alone truly opens up this amazingly diverse cruising ground for yachts to explore at will.

Following the meeting, Richard Lofthouse, commented, 'It was an enlightening and enjoyable to meet with Ms Rini', adding, 'She welcomed us and talked openly and frankly, showing a first rate understanding of the new rules and regulations as well as expressing a constructive attitude towards helping to grow the numbers of superyachts coming to Indonesia.

The GM reported that by extending a more supportive and helpful Customs welcome than in the past, this in turn allows Asia Pacific Superyachts to move forward with much greater confidence into a new era for Indonesia as a welcoming superyacht (and, presumably 'normal' cruising yachts) destination. The APS GM concluded, 'This appears to be a major sign that Indonesia is coming of age and recognizing the true potential of Marine Tourism in her waters. We are very excited and looking forward to a great 2012.'

The PIB Bond was in fact only one of four options available to visiting yachts. However, it was the only one which involved a cash transaction and so became the preferred option of certain Customs officials. It quickly became infamous in yachting circles.

This is clearly outstanding news for those who wish to base longer term in Indonesia (up to three years!) exploring this diverse archipelago.

What it means in practice:
Following 5 years of lobbying by the private sector to get the unpopular PIB Customs Bond changed, the Indonesian President signed the new Maritime Tourism law on October 31st, 2011.

The new regulations, which came into effect from the 3rd December 2011, mean that PIB (Temporary Import Documentation) must still be completed at the first port of call, however, without the requirement for any monetary bond, only a guarantee letter from any of the following is required:-

- a. Government Officials of the Central Government of the level Echelon I or equivalent.
- b. Government Officials of a Local Government Office of the level Echelon II or equivalent which act as an organizer of the a foreign visit tour boat (yacht) in their region.
- c. Organizers tourist ship visits (yacht) foreign.
- d. General agent.

It is therefore our understanding of these new regulations, that any visiting yacht must ask an Approved Indonesian Body (as listed (a)-(d) above) to provide the Jaminan Tertulis (Written Guarantee) and arrange the PIB documentation. There are already many countries in the world whose customs authorities require the use of an agent to facilitate customs, so Indonesia will, presumably, now be no different.

After the PIB has been processed, the vessel is cleared to cruise any destinations within Indonesia as listed on their CAIT and will be fully covered by this initial paperwork process. The PIB is extendable, along with the CAIT in multiples of 3 months up to a total of 3 years unbroken. It is also proposed that in the future there will be changes to the CAIT application procedure to make it easier and faster.

At the final port of call, the boat must be 'exported' (PEB) which has again been simplified into a relatively easy piece of paperwork.

It has been conjectured that there would be a period of uncertainty as these new regulations are implemented across a vast archipelago country and the full systems are not yet in place; as all local authorities must be informed of how to correctly apply the new regulations. To many familiar with Indonesia’s stunning cruising grounds, the news of the total removal of the monetary Bond and the more relaxed regulations is very welcome news, and the confirmation by Ms Rini seems to confirm that the information is being promulgated around the country.



Did you like this article? If you are not a Sail-World subscriber already, did you know that you can keep up with all the news from the world of the cruising sailor with a weekly news hit? It's totally free, as all our income is from the advertisers.

Once you subscribe, all the non-racing news comes to you in one easy to read news magazine, right to your inbox. AND it's up to date, so you don't have to wait for the end of the month to find out what's going on. You can even subscribe a friend. http://www.sail-world.com/Cruising/international/newsletter_subscribe.cfm!Click_here_now!

Henri Lloyd 50 YearsMusto 2016 660x82 3Pantaenius - Fixed Value

Related Articles

Fifth Blog from on board Perie Banou II
Jon Sanders is closing in on Reunion and Mauritius The west coast of Australia is now a long way behind. Then it was 3 reefs in the mainsail. Windy. A wind one gets in the region - history shows it has been the same over the past 400 years - Southerlies. Soon the wind bends. And we get the South East trades proper. For the first 1,000 Nautical Miles the Trades were what I expected. Very strong southerlies leaving the Australian shore (Shark Bay).
Posted on 2 Dec
Predictwind release improved racing and cruising routing function
PredictWind has released a major upgrade to its Routing function, taking a much more graphic and interactive approach PredictWind has released a major upgrade to its Routing function, taking a much more graphic and interactive approach to what has been a black art of weather routing, used to chose the fastest route for racers or most comfortable route for cruisers.
Posted on 28 Nov
Only room for one at the top
The results of RMIT's (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology) independent testing are in. The results of RMIT's (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology) independent testing are in. Zhik® is the market leader in waterproof durability with a new standard that replicates the real world sailing environment and conditions. It is an astounding four times more so than the previous leader.
Posted on 28 Nov
Beneteau Cup – A statement in family and time
Every other deity with a nautical interest seemed to sense the importance of the occasion and delivered in spades Flagstaff Marine delivered a terrific regatta to mark the 25th Beneteau Cup on Sydney Harbour. It seemed fitting that Beneteau had two factory representatives there as well, headed up by Director, Beneteau Group Asia Pacific, Thibaut de Montvalon and also Asia Sales Manager, Beneteau Group Asia, Vianney Guezenec.
Posted on 28 Nov
Parlier reigns supreme in Hydrofoil Worlds
The south westerly breeze kicks over the land mass over north facing beach, making for flat water despite strong wind. Whatever the shortcomings of the Fremantle Doctor on the first day of competition, were made up for in spades on day two, when the wind kicked in early at 15 knots and quickly built to 18 with gusts as high as 26. The Rockingham course is perfectly suited to such conditions. The south westerly breeze kicks over the land mass over the north facing beach, making for flat water despite strong wind.
Posted on 27 Nov
25th Beneteau Cup - Great weather. Great times. Great brand.
The 25th Beneteau Cup on Sydney Harbour was filled with a genuine sense of joy. The 25th Beneteau Cup on Sydney Harbour was filled with a genuine sense of joy. Flagstaff Marine, together with regatta partners Sydney City Marine, Mark Anderson’s Boat Transport and d’Albora Marinas, can be very proud of the achievement, but it is the owners and crews who make it all possible. Here then are some of the pics of their day! Full report to follow…
Posted on 26 Nov
Ensign want to sell your boat!
Ensign have had such a successful sales year that they are now looking for more pre-used stock to sell. Ensign, one of Australia’s largest yacht brokers, have had such a successful sales year that they are now looking for more pre-used stock to sell. At their head office location at Main Beach, Queensland, they can offer amazing rates on berthing while the boat is on sale at their Marinas Cove Marina and that means great exposure.
Posted on 24 Nov
Fourth Blog from on board Perie Banou II
Oh no - not the coffee cup Oh no - not the coffee cup - Jon keeps us all entertained as he approaches Reunion Island. The B&G chartplotter tells me since leaving the pleasant mid Western Australian town of Carnarvon (by world standards, an isolated town), that I have sailed some 2559 NM and have 751nm to go to Le Port Reunion Island. French. Reunion is a Suburb (department) of Paris. Population 844,000.
Posted on 23 Nov
Third Blog from onboard Perie Banou II
Wind over the last week has been quiet and mild - Trade Winds from South East and South South East. It is 0830am here. 1030 in Western Australia. Windy. Rather Windy. Wind over the last week has been quiet and mild - Trade Winds from South East and South South East. Barometer 1018 to 1020 whatever they are. Last night I tapped the barometer and it sorta went oops. 1015hPa. Blimey.
Posted on 18 Nov
Beneteau Cup - the 25th is the 25th
Beneteau Cup - the 25th is the 25th Flagstaff Marine will present the 25th Beneteau Cup on Friday, November 25. It is always a great day, both on and off the water, with loads of door prizes, great music and fantastic times assured. Of course, to be a part of it you do have to book in! You can enter this historic event right https://www.topyacht.com.au/db/aus/series_select.php?EventID=681!HERE!new and now - so hop to it...
Posted on 15 Nov