Please select your home edition
Edition
Sail Exchange 728x90 1

Lord Nelson arrives in Adelaide

by Heather Ewing on 30 Aug 2013
Tall ship Lord Nelson - now in Adelaide SW
Lord Nelson, which has already won a following in Fremantle and Albany, WA, arrived in Adelaide this afternoon. The 55-metre square rigger is owned by UK charity, Jubilee Sailing Trust, and was designed and built to enable disabled and able-bodied crew members to sail together.

During Lord Nelson’s short visit to Adelaide this weekend she will appear at the Festival of Maritime Trades at the South Australia Maritime Museum. The museum is hosting the biggest gathering of tall ships in South Australia for quarter of a century in Port Adelaide Inner Harbour.

Lord Nelson will be open to the public on Saturday 31 August and South Australians will be able to get on board to explore the ship and see some of the features that make her accessible to disabled and able bodied people, including braille signage, hearing l oops, speaking compass, wheelchair lifts between decks and a bowsprit that is wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair.

Adelaide resident Craig Gordon, 48, whose participation has been sponsored by Norton Rose Fulbright and Rotary International, has been a crew member on board Lord Nelson since she set sail from Singapore on 10 June and will sail into his home city.

The father of five, who runs a scrap metal recycling business, has been blind since the age of eight and also wears hearing aids in both ears due to hearing impairment.

Approaching his home port, Craig said, 'I’m getting excited because any homecoming is a sweet feeling. It’s the main reason I chose to sail on this voyage.

'I can’t pick out a highlight; the whole voyage has been the highlight for me. I came with the view of being as sailor and experiencing as much as I could. I will always remember the ship and the feeling of ‘mateship’ on board.'

Craig’s family and friends, including his wife and children were on the dock to meet Lord Nelson as she sailed into Port Adelaide this afternoon.

Lord Nelson is making her first ever visit to Australia having been invited to take part in the RAN International Fleet Review in Sydney in October.

The invitation from the Royal Australian Navy was the catalyst for Lord Nelson’s departure on the first ever circumnavigation of the globe by an accessible tall ship. The two -year, 50,000-mile Norton Rose Fulbright Sail the World Challenge will see the ship call in to more than 30 ports on six continents and round three Great Capes; she has already sailed around the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa and Cape Leeuwin in Australia. Early next year she will round the infamous Cape Horn at the very tip of South America.

The voyage will carry the message of equality and inclusion to every port of call. Norton Rose Fulbright, which has five offices in Australia, is supporting this unique global voyage under their banner of 'All abilities. All aboard.' The global legal practice supports the Jubilee Sailing Trust’s values of diversity, inclusion and integration.

Crew are paired up in a buddy system and work together to support each other during a voyage. The minimum age is 16 and there is no upper age limit. Everyone works to his or her ability and the ship’s ethos is to focus on what people can do, rather than what they can’t.

A limited number of berths are still available for disabled and abled bodied people from across Australia to join Lord Nelson on the voyage from Sydney to Auckland and wider availability during her forthcoming visit to New Zealand. For more information, including voyage dates and availability, visit www.jst.org.uk, email info@jst.org.uk or call 03 9981 3312 in Australia.

As well as Lord Nelson, the Jubilee Sailing Trust operates a second accessible tall ship, Tenacious, and more than 37,000 people have sailed with the organisation since it was founded in 1978, 14,000 of whom are physically disabled, including 5,000 wheelchair users.

Lord Nelson embarked on her 23-month voyage from Southampton in the UK in October last year, riding the wave of success enjoyed by the London 2012 Paralympic Games, and arrived in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 9 December, before setting sail again for a second transatlantic crossing, this time to Cape Town, and a first-ever visit to South Africa. During her inaugural visit to Australia Lord Nelson will also visit Melbourne and Hobart before arriving in Sydney to take part in the RAN International Fleet Review.

STS Lord Nelson Facts and Figures

Length: 55 metres
Beam: 9 metres
Deck to fore masthead: 31 metres
Sail area: 1,024m2
Number of sails: 18
Fresh water capacity: 22 tonnes
Launched: 15 October 1985
Max speed under sail: 10 knots
Crew: 50 comprising: 8 permanent crew
2 bosun’s mates
1 cook’s assistant
1 cadet
38 voyage (paying) crew; 17 may be physically disabled and 4 may be wheelchair users
Cooper Teamwear 660x82 1Dubarry AUS 2017 660x82 4Jeanneau Sunfast 660x82

Related Articles

AMSA marine notice – Importance of using official nautical charts
This notice draws attention to the importance of using official nautical charts to comply with flag State requirements. Official charts are those issued by or on the authority of a government, authorised hydrographic office or other relevant government institution.
Posted on 24 May
Line 7 Marine presents Squadron II jacket in time for SCIBS
The Squadron II Jacket is now on shelves and has been designed to keep the wearer on the water for longer. The Squadron II Jacket is now on shelves and has been designed specifically to keep the wearer on the water for longer. It’s crafted from 100% waterproof fabric, with a high level of breathability for extra comfort and pulls together a host of extra features.
Posted on 23 May
Old4New Van notches up 100,000km and 20,000 lifejackets
Minister for Roads Maritime and Freight Melinda Pavey today announced the Old4New life jacket programme Minister for Roads Maritime and Freight Melinda Pavey today announced the Old4New life jacket programme had exchanged more than 20,000 old lifejackets for new ones, spreading the ‘wear a lifejacket’ message.
Posted on 23 May
Nineteenth blog from on board Perie Banou II - Panama Canal Transit
Still at Shelter Bay Marina Colon. Atlantic end of the Panama Canal. But not for long. Still at Shelter Bay Marina Colon. Atlantic end of the Panama Canal. But not for long. Shelter Bay is the natural meeting place of lots cruising yachts. Their tall masts and rows and rows of furling headsails. Most American and European. Friendly bunch.
Posted on 17 May
Zip up, step out – Top technical jackets
Zip up, step out – Top technical jackets Zip up, step out – Top technical jackets
Posted on 11 May
Eighteenth blog from on board Perie Banou II - Colon, Panama
Perie Banou is tied to the relatively new Shelter Bay Marina. Colon. Good Marina. With services, some modest. Colon remains, as with previous years, a dangerous city. But it is much cleaner and getting better. Perie Banou II is tied to the relatively new Shelter Bay Marina. Colon. Good Marina. With services, some modest. Balboa is the port for Panama City on the Pacific Ocean. The other end of the Canal. If one looked at a map or chart of all of the Americas and one wanted to cross from the Atlantic to th
Posted on 10 May
Seventeenth blog from on board Perie Banou II - Panama
I am back on the high seas. Left Nanny Cay Marina using engine, motored to Norman Bight, Norman Island, BVI. I am back on the high seas. Left Nanny Cay Marina using engine, motored to Norman Bight, Norman Island, British Virgin Islands. In quiet weather, sailing, motor sailing, or motor boating I can clip the tiller on (quick easy). Then clip the Simrad electronic tiller pilot. Then I steer electronically.
Posted on 4 May
Servicing winches for a longer, more efficient life
A question we get asked often is all about winch servicing and how often should this be done and how hard is it. A question we get asked often is all about winch servicing and how often should this be done and how hard is it. We thought we might try and answer the most common questions and put people’s minds at ease as to how it's done. How often should you service your winches?
Posted on 3 May
ANMM welcomes first European artefact to appear on Australian soil
ANMM is excited to welcome the first European artefact to appear on Australian soil, the Dirk Hartog Plate Just over four hundred years ago Dutch mariner Dirk Hartog (1580–1621) sailed into history when, on 25 October 1616, he made the first documented European landing on the west coast of Australia. And this week the Australian National Maritime Museum is excited to welcome the first European artefact to appear on Australian soil, the Dirk Hartog Plate, to Sydney on special loan
Posted on 3 May
Debbie says the 8thP with Insurance is Patience (Pt.III)
We’re back to keep exploring the nature of TC Debbie and how she came to tell us about the eighth P of insurance We’re back to keep exploring the nature of TC Debbie and how she came to tell us about the eighth P of insurance. We’ve looked at what it was like to come into a disaster zone, seen the evidence of those that did the right thing, and how the area is already on the road to recovery. Now we’ll see why patience is the key in the aftermath of her fury.
Posted on 30 Apr