Please select your home edition
Edition
North Sails 2017 Sales Staff

Hold the phone Russell ... America’s finally listening

by Mark Rothfield on 4 Feb 2013
There’s a theory – yet to be proved – that wind is caused by trees waving their branches, and in the case of my dopey golden retriever its tails really can wag the dog whenever it’s walkies.

Now, a US boat manufacturer is actually listening to its Australian importer when designing a new model.

Gone are the days when America sneezed and the world caught a cold. Now it’s us holding the hanky and a glass of hot lemon …

‘Australia is a significant market for Crownline,’ said Australian distributor David Fraser.

‘As a direct consequence of our long standing relationship with the factory, our input was keenly sought during the development of the new Crownline 19 XS. I was pleased to be involved in the design, testing of the prototype, and final development of the production boat.’

Such a comment was unthinkable in the pre-GFC days when precious few Americans knew Australia existed let alone took us seriously. We were a bunch of croc wrestlers who threw shrimps on barbies and phones at recalcitrant hotel staff.

But, hey, money talks. We’re buoyed by a resources boom and obscenely wealthy, er healthy, banking system.

It’s all part of the seismic global shift that will make life increasingly difficult for domestic boat builders who previously argued that their boats, alone, were designed for Australia’s harsh conditions. They’re fast losing their point of difference and don’t have the luxury of an export market in return.

Crownline rewarded Fraser’s contribution to the new 19 XS by using the 2013 Melbourne Summer Boat Show (Feb 1-3) as the bowrider’s international launch pad. Being beautifully styled and affordably priced, it’s likely to prove very popular.

A full cockpit length windscreen complements the flowing hull lines, while the seating arrangement features a spacious bow section and huge wrap-around rear lounge. A portable/removable icebox fits under the centre of the rear lounge, which has all the hallmarks of an Aussie innovation.

Our true-blue loyalty to outboards is recognised as well, with the 19 XS rated to carry motors up to 175hp on its transom. A four-stroke Mercury 150, by way of example, will give a top speed of almost 40 knots with a 19-inch pitch prop.

The boat/motor/trailer package will sell for around $54,990, including bimini, covers and safety equipment and the Mercury 150. It’s powerful value for such a well-appointed and built vessel … and that, too, is something you’d have never said before our dollar became worth more than theirs. Booyah!
Jeanneau Sunfast 660x82X-Yachts AUS X4 - 660 - 1Harken AUS HL Snatch Block 660x82

Related Articles

The return to Coffs!
The word is out that the new race to Coffs Harbour is on. The phoenix would run once again in the Christmas timeslot The word is out that the new race to Coffs Harbour is on. The phoenix would run once again in the traditional Christmas timeslot, and also be the much easier to digest 200 or so miles. The ‘new’ race would also be geared towards club racers, so they, and their non-pro crews could be out and back, and almost more importantly, returned to work before anyone missed them. Bring it on...
Posted on 22 May
Breadth and depth
Been fortunate to see all manner of craft over the last week or so. Metre boats, One Design, production cruisers, maxis Been fortunate to see all manner of craft over the last week or so. Metre boats, One Design, production cruisers, maxis, racers new, like Ker40s to old, such as Adams 10, and then a smattering of off the beach classes as well. It is cool in South and wet in Sydney, so maybe it was the notion of the commencement soon enough of the boat watching season that had me thinking shorts and big hats.
Posted on 15 May
Bad Haircuts
We’ve all had at least one. One that we’d admit to, at any rate, which simply means there could be plenty more. We’ve all had at least one. One that we’d admit to, at any rate, which simply means there could be plenty more. Still, there were others who adopted the one really poor look and then clung to it, much like the skipper with the helm in his hands as the band played on to ensure the ambience was just right, and other more officious ones kept rearranging those deckchairs…
Posted on 8 May
Riff!
Unashamedly, the whole thing began with a story this week from the Australian Sailing Team Unashamedly, the whole thing began with a story this week from the Australian Sailing Team. Actually, they’ve all been good. Fresh, exciting, and it is no doubt as a result of the AST sailors opening up more. Also lovely to see some top results at the regatta in Hyeres too, even if others are more like a scatter graph at present.
Posted on 1 May
You can almost see it
The windward/leeward is great fun and a real test of your skills. True, it might be hard for the uninitiated to follow The windward/leeward is great fun and a real test of your skills. True, it might be hard for the uninitiated to follow, but then sailing is not the world’s largest spectator sport by any means. Badminton does rate higher, after all. Still, when you’re doing it, you not really worried about little racquets and small, caged up, feathered thingamabobs.
Posted on 24 Apr
Almost got sad…
Then realised that in fact racing was not over. It was just a change in focus, that’s all. Then realised that in fact racing was not over. It was just a change in focus, that’s all. Black Jack stormed away to grab Line Honours in the Brisbane to Gladstone, and thanks also to Nigel Statham for providing us with more info. Of course it could be the 70’ rocketship’s last outing under that name, with the 40 and now 100 to be Peter Harburg’s nautical passions.
Posted on 18 Apr
Rotten…
Spoiled rotten. Indulged. Blessed. Having a ball. Anointed from on high. These might have been some of the terms... Spoiled rotten. Indulged. Blessed. Having a ball. Anointed from on high. These might have been some of the terms used to describe the 10th Sail Port Stephens. However, it was probably more in the smiles, the buzz on the quay in the morning, and the audible volume back at Broughton’s each night after sailing. Indeed, on the only non-sailing day, Thursday, it was not a ghost a town...
Posted on 10 Apr
And that’s a lot!
142. Impressive. It’s a lot. In landlubber terms, 142 knots is 263 kilometres per hour. Now that is ginormous 142. Impressive. It’s a lot. In landlubber terms, 142 knots is 263 kilometres per hour. Now that is ginormous, for you would need a well decent car to do that on the highway, as well as a lot of track because you swallow up tarmac at a voracious rate. Your closure rate on upcoming vehicles is also well over the legal limit and something like the old ton, 100mp/h, should you be old enough for that
Posted on 5 Apr
Barge
So if we had 'Plumb' not that long ago, then this has to be about the barge bow. So if we had 'Plumb' not that long ago, then this has to be about the barge bow. It’s not the pram, and we will not pause there any longer than to say I have no idea why we put kids out in those in this modern era, other than it has to be political.
Posted on 27 Mar
It’s all moving on…
The starting point was seeing that Phaedo3 had taken Line Honours in the Newport Harbour YC Cabo Race. The starting point was seeing that Phaedo3 had taken Line Honours in the Newport Harbour YC Cabo Race. I am still thinking about Miles Seddon’s great material about what is like on board from So What’s It Really like? True, he was not there for this run down the West coast of the North American landmass, but it is a little akin to his ‘spray back vortex’, the vacuum caused by the incredible feats
Posted on 20 Mar