Sail-World.com  Sunday 21 December 2014

Home Graphical | News Text | Powerboat-World | Cruising Oz | Cruising USA | Cruising Canada | BoatsPlus | MarineBusiness | Newsletters | Cruising Int | SW Aus | Newsletter Subscription Here | Search Sail-World


sail-world.com -- America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ - getting from side to side

America's Cup: Emirates Team NZ - getting from side to side    
Fri, 9 Nov 2012


Here’s the second part of the interview Sailing World editor Dave Reed had with Emirates Team New Zealand technical director Nick Holroyd. The interview was first published in the October issue of sailing World magazine.

There’s a lot of boat to cross for the manoeuvres; how does everyone get up on that hull quickly?

One guy leaves the weather side early to load up a sheet winch and set up the boards. Then the majority of the crew crosses the boat as it’s going head to wind. You leave a couple guys behind to get the board down and then bring them across. We’re looking more to have weight on the high side out of the tack—you need that full power to sheet on the wing and get the acceleration going because your boat speed deltas between the bottom of the tack and getting going again are vast. Getting the guys up to the high side early to have stability is very important.

How about the helmsman getting from wheel to wheel?

There’s a triple act between Ray [Davies], Dean [Barker], and Glen [Ashby]. Someone’s taking the wheel off Dean, and he’s set up to take the wheel out of the tack. The boats are actually pretty efficient through the tack, unlike most multihulls, because the wing drag is low compared to soft-sail cats.

It appears your rig is farther aft than that of Oracle’s. What’s the tradeoff?

Again, it comes down to structure, and in this case, how much forestay tension you can achieve within the structure. A lot of forestay tension means a lot of stretch in the forestays, backstays, and under-rigging, which means a lot of work in terms of grinder input. The boards are highly loaded, and going through those manoeuvres is about keeping wing controls relatively simple. If you have too many controls to get the wing shape to where you want it to be, you’re likely never going to get there.

For the rest of this interview 2012/11/ac72-design-getting-from-side-to-side

by ETNZBlog



Our advertisers are committed to our sport, please support them! (Graphics)
Contact us , ph: +61 2 8006 1873, , fax: +61 2 8076 0459 or complete our feedback form. View our Privacy Policy. Photographs are copyright by law, if you wish to use a photograph from www.sail-world.com, please Contact us. [Go Home(Graphics)]
Make sail-world.com Australia my default page.    Make sail-world.com Cruising International my default page.  Make sail-world.com Cruising Australia my default page.  Make sail-world.com Asia my default page.   Make sail-world.com New Zealand my default page.   Make sail-world.com UK my default page.   Make sail-world.com USA my default page.  


Visit another region : Sail-World Australia    Sail-World Cruising International   Sail-World Cruising Australia   Sail-World Asia   Sail-World New Zealand   Sail-World UK   Sail-World USA  

Guy Nowell Photography
Location shoots, studio photography, 4x5" large format, 6x6cm medium format, 35mm film, 11mp digital...
[More info]
http://www.guynowell.com/flash.cfm