Please select your home edition
Edition
T Clewring AC72

Raja Muda 2013 – Penang Inshores. The boomerang that didn't come back

by Guy Nowell, Sail-World Asia on 21 Nov 2013
Raja Muda Selangor International Regatta 2013. Penang. © Guy Nowell / RMSIR
The Penang inshore races in the Raja Muda series are best known for hot sunshine, flat water and a very long wait for a sea breeze to arrive. Today was rather different – 10 knots or so from the northeast, and persistent chilly rain. Tropical rain we understand: warm, heavy, and strictly short time. This was English rain. Booked in for the whole day.

Running Classes 1, 3, 4 and 7 on Course Red and 2, 5 and 6 on Course Yellow spread the personnel resources a bit, but a windward-leeward course was laid for the racing classes at 050 degrees and 1.6nm, with a vicious tide running perpendicular to the racecourse. It was a clear start, and HiFi quickly stretched her legs to round the top mark in pole position and run down to the bottom, still leading the pack. Utarid followed through in second, and then it became complicated.

Lero arrived on starboard with Windsikher overlapped on the inside, just as EFG Bank Mandrake came into the frame behind them. Windsikher had the inside berth, but the cross tide forced her to point up for the mark – just as Lero was being swept down to it, which meant that Windsikher was caught between a Russian (Lero) and a squishy place (the mark), choosing to kiss the mark in preference to a collision with Lero. So far, so good.

However, Windsikher hooked the mark in the process and started to carry it away. At the same time, EFG Bank Mandrake crossed behind the first pair only to meet Fujin coming to the pin on port – Fujin gybed to clear the area, but connected with Mandrake in the process (and was subsequently DSQ’d by the Jury).



Hang on, it gets better. Next, the incoming Class 3 fleet was obliged to round Windsikher who was still in control of the mark, before a RIB flying an ‘M’ flag took up position. But wait, the story continues! Class 4 safely rounded the ‘M’ flag, but the leading multihull in Class 7, Mojo, performed exactly the same manoeuvre as Windsikher – approaching on starboard for an uptide port rounding… and hooked the mark boat (which, lastly, was replaced by the original mark having been retrieved from Windseeker). Phew!



After that level of excitement, everything else was an anticlimax. The trailing boat in the Multihull class, Boomerang, took off on a spectator cruise after her leeward rounding and failed to respond to radio calls. That’s right, Jerry Rollin’s boomerang wouldn’t come back (thanks, Cozzie).

Race 2 took off sharpish on the same course, but the breeze started to swing left left and more left as the boats went round the top mark for the first time – from 050? all the way to 330?, making for a no-gybes spinnaker reach to the ‘leeward’ mark. Flag ‘C’ and course change to 330?, almost straight uptide, and forcing a 270? mark rounding. But wait – the wind then swung back to 050?and beyond to 020? making for another soldier’s course to the finish, but this time on port. It could have been a day for hair-tearing and petulant foot-stamping, but all was calm aboard the Committee Boat. Well, almost.

Boats With Doors were racing over on Yellow Course (Classes 2, 5, 6). Regatta Director Malcolm Elliott’s amazing grid-reverse-grid waypoint system for setting courses was working fine until Antipodes found that the windward mark had disappeared. Purloined for a greater cause – the subsidisation of the Penang fishing industry, maybe? The Radio Raja Muda chat show hosted by the RO had everyone voting for rounding a navigation mark, but Antipodes had already steamed past that and the prospect of calculating redress was going to be way too hard, so the race was abandoned.





Almost everyone was only too happy to wave goodbye at the end of a substantially cool and damp day on the water. T-shirts and shorts are meant to be ‘de rigeur’ for the Raja Muda, and rain is meant to be warm here in the tropics. So it was noticeable that many of the sailors were not sporting foulies of any sort. Brrrrr…

Back on shore, and fun time this evening was the prizegiving party at the Straits Quay Atrium. Great Penang street food, fast flowing beer, and a lion dance from the troupe that for my money (I have none, but I have seen an awful lot of lion dances during 30 years in Asia) put on the best show of them all. Bravo.

Quotes from the boats. Simon Piff, Rainbow Dream: 'We forgot the GPS and the SIs this morning, so figured we’d just follow everyone else. It was a surprise and a bit of a problem when we arrived at the top mark first and hadn’t got a clue where to go next…'

After today’s short course racing, tomorrow is back to the long haul stuff. Penang to Langkawi, and the moment when people start to ask 1. What day is it? 2. Are we there yet? and 3. How many more days? (The answer is three days’ racing and five races). Some will fall by the wayside. Watch this space.



Short results
(full results at http://www.rmsir.com/1_RESULTS.html)

Class 1
1. Foxy Lady 2, 2, 1, 2, (7)
2. HiFi 4, 1, 3, 3 (11)
3. Windsikher (1, 4, 6, 1 (12)
Class 2
1. Antipodes 1, 1 (2)
2. Australian Maid 3, 2 (5)
3. 3. Shahtoosh 2, 4 (6)
Class 3
1. Fujin 1, 1, 3, 1 (6)
2. Steel de Breeze 2, 2, 2, 2 (8)
3. Sea Bass 3, 3, 1, 3 (10)
Class 4
1. Mat Salleh 1, 1, 1, 1 (4)
2. NiJinski 2, 2, 3, 2 (9)
3. Skybird 3, 6, 2, 3 (14)

Phuket Raceweek 2016 660x82Barz Optics - San Juan Worlds Best EyewearBakewell-White Yacht Design

Related Articles

Rio 2016 - The Qualification Games - Part 2
Yachting NZ's refusal to nominate in three classes won in the first round of 2016 Olympic Qualification is unprecedented Yachting New Zealand's refusal to nominate in three classes won in the first round of 2016 Olympic Qualification is without precedent. Subject to Appeal, the Kiwis have signaled that they will reject 30% of the positions gained in the ISAF World Sailing Championships in Santander in 2014.
Posted on 22 May
Gladwell's Line - World Sailing changes tack after IOC windshift
Over the past year, we've given the International Sailing Federation (now re-badged as World Sailing) a bit of stick Over the past year, we've given the International Sailing Federation (now re-badged as World Sailing) a bit of stick. Every blow well earned over issues such as the pollution at Rio, the Israeli exclusion abomination plus a few more. But now World Sailing is getting it right.
Posted on 21 May
Rio 2016 - The Qualification Games - Part 1
Antipodean selection shenanigans aside, the Qualification system for the Rio Olympics appears to be achieving its goals Antipodean selection shenanigans aside, the Qualification system for the Rio Olympics appears to be achieving goals set in the Olympic Commission report of 2010. Around 64 countries are expected to be represented in Rio de Janeiro in August. That is a slight increase on Qingdao and Weymouth, but more importantly a full regional qualification system is now in place
Posted on 19 May
Taming the beast-a conversation with Stuart Meurer of Parker Hannifin
While AC72 cats were fast, they difficult to control, so Oracle partnered with Parker Hannifin to innovate a better way. If you watched videos of the AC72s racing in the 34th America’s Cup (2013), you’re familiar with the mind-boggling speeds that are possible when wingsail-powered catamarans switch from displacement sailing to foiling mode. While foiling is fast, there’s no disguising the platform’s inherent instability. Now, Oracle Team USA has teamed up with Parker Hannifin to innovate a better way.
Posted on 18 May
From foiling Moths to Olympic starting lines-a Q&A with Bora Gulari
Bora Gulari’s is representing the USA at the Rio 2016 Olympics in the Nacra 17 class, along with teammate Louisa Chafee. Bora Gulari (USA) has made a strong name for himself within high-performance sailing circles, with wins at the 2009 and 2013 Moth Worlds. In between, he broke the 30-knort barrier and was the 2009 US SAILING Rolex Yachtsman of the Year. His latest challenge is representing the USA at the Rio 2016 Olympics in the Nacra 17 class as skipper, along with his teammate Louisa Chafee.
Posted on 12 May
Concern for Zika at Rio Olympics is now deadly serious
Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, or the Rio Olympics. Many others have, and they were apt, but things have changed. So here now we have a situation where one man, Associate Professor Amir Attaran, who does have a more than decent string of letters after his name, is bringing nearly as many facts to bear as references at the article's end
Posted on 12 May
The importance of being Alive
Since buying the stunningly pretty Reichel-Pugh canting keel 66-footer, and re-naming her Alive, Since buying the stunningly pretty Reichel-Pugh canting keel 66-footer, and re-naming her Alive, the team have lined up for a lot of things, won plenty and nabbed a record, as well. She’s presently in a yard in the Philippines having a minor refit in readiness for the Australian season. It will commence with the upcoming Brisbane to Keppel and then head sharply into this year’s Hobart.
Posted on 10 May
Zhik - The brand born of a notion, not its history
here is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline is officially marketed as Made For Water There is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline has been officially marketed as Made For Water, and this is precisely what the company has done for the last eight years before the succinct and apt strapline came from out of R&D and into mainstream visibility.
Posted on 8 May
Shape of next Volvo Ocean Race revealed at Southern Spars - Part 1
Southern Spars has been confirmed as the supplier of spars for the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race. In mid-April, Race Director, Jack Lloyd and Stopover Manager Richard Mason outlined the changes expected for the 40,000nm Race during a tour of Southern Spars 10,000sq metre specialist spar construction facility. A total of up to seven boats is expected to enter, but time is running out for the construction of any new boats.
Posted on 3 May
Sailing in the Olympics beyond 2016 - A double Olympic medalist's view
Bruce Kendall takes a look at what he believes Sailing needs to do to survive beyond the 2016 Olympics. Gold and Bronze medalist and multiple world boardsailing/windsurfer champion, Bruce Kendall takes a look at what he believes Sailing needs to do to survive beyond the 2016 Olympics. A key driver is the signalled intention by the International Olympic Committee to select a basket of events that will be contested.
Posted on 29 Apr