Please select your home edition
Edition
Hall Boom

Raja Muda 2013 – Penang Inshores. The boomerang that didn't come back

by Guy Nowell, Sail-World Asia on 21 Nov 2013
Raja Muda Selangor International Regatta 2013. Penang. © Guy Nowell / RMSIR
The Penang inshore races in the Raja Muda series are best known for hot sunshine, flat water and a very long wait for a sea breeze to arrive. Today was rather different – 10 knots or so from the northeast, and persistent chilly rain. Tropical rain we understand: warm, heavy, and strictly short time. This was English rain. Booked in for the whole day.

Running Classes 1, 3, 4 and 7 on Course Red and 2, 5 and 6 on Course Yellow spread the personnel resources a bit, but a windward-leeward course was laid for the racing classes at 050 degrees and 1.6nm, with a vicious tide running perpendicular to the racecourse. It was a clear start, and HiFi quickly stretched her legs to round the top mark in pole position and run down to the bottom, still leading the pack. Utarid followed through in second, and then it became complicated.

Lero arrived on starboard with Windsikher overlapped on the inside, just as EFG Bank Mandrake came into the frame behind them. Windsikher had the inside berth, but the cross tide forced her to point up for the mark – just as Lero was being swept down to it, which meant that Windsikher was caught between a Russian (Lero) and a squishy place (the mark), choosing to kiss the mark in preference to a collision with Lero. So far, so good.

However, Windsikher hooked the mark in the process and started to carry it away. At the same time, EFG Bank Mandrake crossed behind the first pair only to meet Fujin coming to the pin on port – Fujin gybed to clear the area, but connected with Mandrake in the process (and was subsequently DSQ’d by the Jury).



Hang on, it gets better. Next, the incoming Class 3 fleet was obliged to round Windsikher who was still in control of the mark, before a RIB flying an ‘M’ flag took up position. But wait, the story continues! Class 4 safely rounded the ‘M’ flag, but the leading multihull in Class 7, Mojo, performed exactly the same manoeuvre as Windsikher – approaching on starboard for an uptide port rounding… and hooked the mark boat (which, lastly, was replaced by the original mark having been retrieved from Windseeker). Phew!



After that level of excitement, everything else was an anticlimax. The trailing boat in the Multihull class, Boomerang, took off on a spectator cruise after her leeward rounding and failed to respond to radio calls. That’s right, Jerry Rollin’s boomerang wouldn’t come back (thanks, Cozzie).

Race 2 took off sharpish on the same course, but the breeze started to swing left left and more left as the boats went round the top mark for the first time – from 050? all the way to 330?, making for a no-gybes spinnaker reach to the ‘leeward’ mark. Flag ‘C’ and course change to 330?, almost straight uptide, and forcing a 270? mark rounding. But wait – the wind then swung back to 050?and beyond to 020? making for another soldier’s course to the finish, but this time on port. It could have been a day for hair-tearing and petulant foot-stamping, but all was calm aboard the Committee Boat. Well, almost.

Boats With Doors were racing over on Yellow Course (Classes 2, 5, 6). Regatta Director Malcolm Elliott’s amazing grid-reverse-grid waypoint system for setting courses was working fine until Antipodes found that the windward mark had disappeared. Purloined for a greater cause – the subsidisation of the Penang fishing industry, maybe? The Radio Raja Muda chat show hosted by the RO had everyone voting for rounding a navigation mark, but Antipodes had already steamed past that and the prospect of calculating redress was going to be way too hard, so the race was abandoned.





Almost everyone was only too happy to wave goodbye at the end of a substantially cool and damp day on the water. T-shirts and shorts are meant to be ‘de rigeur’ for the Raja Muda, and rain is meant to be warm here in the tropics. So it was noticeable that many of the sailors were not sporting foulies of any sort. Brrrrr…

Back on shore, and fun time this evening was the prizegiving party at the Straits Quay Atrium. Great Penang street food, fast flowing beer, and a lion dance from the troupe that for my money (I have none, but I have seen an awful lot of lion dances during 30 years in Asia) put on the best show of them all. Bravo.

Quotes from the boats. Simon Piff, Rainbow Dream: 'We forgot the GPS and the SIs this morning, so figured we’d just follow everyone else. It was a surprise and a bit of a problem when we arrived at the top mark first and hadn’t got a clue where to go next…'

After today’s short course racing, tomorrow is back to the long haul stuff. Penang to Langkawi, and the moment when people start to ask 1. What day is it? 2. Are we there yet? and 3. How many more days? (The answer is three days’ racing and five races). Some will fall by the wayside. Watch this space.



Short results
(full results at http://www.rmsir.com/1_RESULTS.html)

Class 1
1. Foxy Lady 2, 2, 1, 2, (7)
2. HiFi 4, 1, 3, 3 (11)
3. Windsikher (1, 4, 6, 1 (12)
Class 2
1. Antipodes 1, 1 (2)
2. Australian Maid 3, 2 (5)
3. 3. Shahtoosh 2, 4 (6)
Class 3
1. Fujin 1, 1, 3, 1 (6)
2. Steel de Breeze 2, 2, 2, 2 (8)
3. Sea Bass 3, 3, 1, 3 (10)
Class 4
1. Mat Salleh 1, 1, 1, 1 (4)
2. NiJinski 2, 2, 3, 2 (9)
3. Skybird 3, 6, 2, 3 (14)

PredictWind.com 2014Bakewell-White Yacht DesignAncasta Ker 33 660x82

Related Articles

Day 72 – Photo-finish predicted in Vendée Globe thriller
The race is going down to the wire with the leading pair of Armel Le Cléac'h and Alex Thomson split by just 78 miles Thomson has been playing catch-up since Le Cléac'h took the lead on December 2 but as the race enters its final few days he has transformed from the chaser into the hunter, ruthlessly stalking his French rival in the hope of being able to deliver the killer blow before the race is up.
Posted today at 10:41 am
Vendee Globe - Thomson marks time with 60hrs sailing time left in race
British solo sailor Alex Thomson has improved only 10nm in 24 hours, and remains 75nm behind the race leader With around 60hrs sailing left in the 2016/17 Vendee Globe Race, British solo sailor Alex Thomson has improved only 10nm in 24 hours, and remains 75nm behind the race leader Armel Le Cleac'h in Banque Populaire V. According to the latest positions (as of 0500FR or 0400UTC) the two competitors were almost on the latitude of the finish at Les Sables d'Olonne
Posted today at 5:10 am
North Technology acquires North Sails Australia
Renowned Sydney loft joins North Sails worldwide network of owned lofts On January 3rd 2017, the North Sails Australia licensed operation was purchased by North Technology Group. North Sails Australia is the country's leading sailmaker with a diverse market ranging from dinghy, One Design, 18' Skiffs, cruising, racing, Grand Prix and Maxis, dating back to when Australia defended the America's Cup in Fremantle in 1987.
Posted on 16 Jan
A Q&A with Dick Neville, Quantum Key West Race Week’s RC chairman
I caught up with Dick Neville, Race Committee chair for the Quantum Key West Race Week, to learn more about the event. For the past 30 years, international sailors have gathered in Key West, Florida, each January for Key West Race Week, a regatta that has achieved legendary status due to its calendar dates, its location, and the impressive level of competition and racecourse management that this storied event offers. I caught up with Dick Neville, Race Committee chair for this year’s Quantum KWRW, to learn more.
Posted on 16 Jan
Vendee Globe - Alex Thomson beats 24 hour world distance record
British sailor Alex Thomson has beaten the world sailing record for the second time in the Vendee Globe British sailor Alex Thomson has beaten the world sailing record for the second time in the Vendee Globe, travelling 536.81 nautical miles in 24 hours. The previous distance record of 534.48 nautical miles was set by Francois Gabart in the 2012 Vendee Globe, Thomson has sailed an additional 2.33 nautical miles.
Posted on 16 Jan
EFG Sailing Arabia – Team Averda focus on food in bid to nail victory
Herrera has come up with a secret weapon that he believes might prove the difference between winning and coming second. Herrera has put together a formidable team of amateur sailors who are talented enough to earn crew spots on some of the fastest boats on the planet.
Posted on 16 Jan
Vendee Globe – Thomson smashes 24-hour distance record
Thomson was among a fleet of 29 mostly French solo sailors that set off from Les Sables d'Olonne. During the 24-hour period running up to the 0800 UTC position report he sailed his racing boat Hugo Boss at an average speed of 22.4 knots, or 25.7mph.
Posted on 16 Jan
Vendee Globe - Amedeo leads quartet round Cape Horn
French skipper Fabrice Amedeo achieved one of his life goals early this morning by passing Cape Horn for the first time. French skipper Fabrice Amedeo achieved one of his life goals early this morning by passing Cape Horn for the first time. The 38-year-old Parisian journalist-turned-solo sailor rounded Cape Horn on the southernmost tip of South America on his IMOCA 60 Newrest Matmut at 0140 UTC to become the 11th Vendée Globe skipper in the Atlantic.
Posted on 16 Jan
Clipper Race - Excitement builds at Crew Brief Day
There was plenty of excitement as hundreds of Clipper 2017-18 Race crew members came together for the first time There was plenty of excitement as hundreds of Clipper 2017-18 Race crew members came together for the first time at the Crew Briefing.
Posted on 16 Jan
Vendee Globe - Not the end for Enda
Enda O'Coineen vowed to complete Vendée Globe by his yacht Team Ireland - Kilcullen Voyager back to Les Sables d'Olonne Irish skipper Enda O'Coineen has vowed to 'complete' the Vendée Globe by sailing his yacht Team Ireland - Kilcullen Voyager back to Les Sables d'Olonne.
Posted on 16 Jan