As a boater you need to read this about this complete Rubbish

Marine-Debris-Timeline
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Jarrod Day, our FishingBoating-World.com Editor makes a point relevant for all marine users

'In today’s era I still can’t believe that so many of our beaches and waterways continually become littered by those too lazy to take their rubbish home.

This is not a problem with the mainstream public but includes recreational marine users who should know much better.


On a recent stroll along a known fishing beach in Australia I was appalled to find discarded bait packets and fishing rod wrappers.

Why is this so? Why can't people take there rubbish home? I would think that with so much focus on looking after our environment, recreational anglers, off the beach sailors, kiteboards, windsurfers would at least have the decency to take their rubbish home with them, it is not that hard.

This applies to on water too. Boat anglers , sailors, powerboaters throwing glass bottles and empty cans over the side. While their excuse may be that 'they may break down over time', this isn’t a reason to toss it overboard; this is still littering.

And the Marine Debris timeline table here sure will make you think. A bottle could last 700 years!!

We as boaters need to combat this recurring problem and should you see someone dropping rubbish into the waterways or even on the ground for that matter should stand up and say something or call the local authorities.

The more people that can remind those that don’t care, the more people may listen and do the right thing.

Tossing rubbish into our waterways not only harms the environment but also kills and injures fish and wildlife.

Facts show that our beaches and waterways are becoming increasing littered.

A survey some years ago of 26 remote Australian Great Barrier Reef islands found 5656 items of rubbish. Among the plastic, glass and metal debris were 725 glass bottles, 1066 plastic fragments, 247 aluminum cans and plastic cups, 919 thongs and one bar fridge.

We know this is not on!

But we as dedicated recreational marine users need to take a lead, set the example and NOT be part of the problem.
http://www.sail-world.com/98614